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Glaetzer Anaperenna Six

Glaetzer Anaperenna Six

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This selection contains three bottles of each of these wines:

Glaetzer Anaperenna 2016

"Even bigger, richer and darker than the 2015, the 2016 Anaperenna Shiraz-Cabernet Sauvignon is 84% Shiraz and 16% Cabernet. These are not wines for fans of shy, delicate wines, but neither are they clumsy fruit bombs. This is pleasantly multifaceted, with complex notes ranging from charred beef, black olive and asphalt to blackberries and cassis, all underscored by loam, vanilla and cedar. Full-bodied (15.5% alcohol), it's hugely ripe but balanced, with supple tannins and enough acidity on the long, velvety finish to balance the ledger. Drink: 2018-2035. 95 points

I was only able to taste a couple of wines with Ben Glaetzer during my May trip to Barossa, so of course he pulled out the best. The 2004 Amon Ra continues to impress, but what Glaetzer has been beaming about the last two years is the debut of his new Shiraz bottling, The Eye of Ra. If you're a Shiraz lover and don't try to track some of this down, you'll be missing out. The rest of the wines were tasted Stateside."

Joe Czerwinski, Wine Advocate (238)

Glaetzer Anaperenna 2017

"I love what Glaetzer's inclusion of Cabernet brings to the 2017 Anaperenna Shiraz-Cabernet Sauvignon, giving it additional fragrance and length. Lifted aromas of mint, raspberries and dark chocolate mark the nose, while the full-bodied palate is rich and velvety but never heavy, framed by supple tannins that turn silky on the long, long finish. Showing great focus, energy and intensity, expect it to still be going strong in a decade. Drink: 2020-2035. 97 points

There's not much new to report from owner-winemaker Ben Glaetzer, other than that he continues to make some stunning wines from Barossa Valley fruit, sourced mainly from the Ebenezer district in the north of the GI. Talking about the 2017s, Glaetzer says he fears they may be a bit overlooked between the 2016s and the 2018s, but says, "I really like the savory tannin structure. The wines just need time." He compares the wines to those from 2005 (drinking well at the moment) and 2015 vintages. Frost lowered the yields in many Barossa vineyards, which led to fast-ripening fruit, but there weren't any major heat spikes. Don't forget to keep an eye out for his new 2016 Eye of Ra Shiraz (reviewed last year), which will be released later in 2019."

Joe Czerwinski, Wine Advocate (06/19)