Alsace


Showing all 11 results

  • Albert Mann Gewurztraminer 2022

    £28.95

    “In 1984, Albert Mann was a small winegrower with just 2.5 hectares/6 acres of vines when his daughter Marie-Claire married Maurice Barthelmé. The domaine had bottled its own wines since 1947, and Maurice Barthelmé set the course for expansion. His brother Jacky Barthelmé joined the company in 1989. The brothers were determined to make quality wine and wanted the best sites. They started applying biodynamic farming methods in 1997 but did not become certified until 2017. Today, the estate owns 25 hectares/62 acres with holdings in seven grand crus and exports to 45 countries. Maurice Barthelmé and Marie-Claire Mann are now retired, and Jacky Barthelmé’s son Antoine has joined the domaine to work in the vineyards and cellar. Pauline Barthelmé, Maurice’s daughter, joined the estate in 2022 on the commercial side. Antoine Barthelmé studied in Beaune and followed this with stints at Alphonse Mellot in Sancerre, Rippon in Central Otago, Stéphane Derenoncourt’s consultancy in Bordeaux and Georges Noëllat in Vosne-Romanée. Domaine Albert Mann planted Pinot Noir in the grand cru sites of Hengst and Pfersigberg as early as 1963; the house is a beacon for that variety today. Albert Mann is another top estate at the vanguard of Alsace. Jacky Barthelmé’s attention to detail is almost obsessive, as is his desire to express his sites. An extraordinary amount of passion informs the ethos of the estate that can be felt in the exceptional and supremely expressive wines – especially in the gorgeous Pinot Noirs.”

    Anne Krebiehl, Vinous (04/23)

    In Stock

  • Albert Mann Gewurztraminer Furstentum Grand Cru Vieilles Vignes 2019

    £41.95

    “The 2019 Gewurztraminer Grand Cru Furstentum Vieilles Vignes offers a clear, intense and refined bouquet of bright fruits intertwined with lemony and smoky notes. Rich and round on the palate, this is a smooth and elegant, well balanced and quiet-flowing Gewurztraminer with fine salinity and delicate bitters on the finish. Not very expansive but elegant and linear. 14% stated alcohol with 31 grams per liter of residual sugar. Natural cork. Tasted at the domaine in May 2022. Drink: 2027-2040. 92+ points”

    Stephan Reinhardt, Wine Advocate (03/23)

    In Stock

  • Albert Mann Pinot Blanc/Auxerrois 2022

    £24.49

    “In 1984, Albert Mann was a small winegrower with just 2.5 hectares/6 acres of vines when his daughter Marie-Claire married Maurice Barthelmé. The domaine had bottled its own wines since 1947, and Maurice Barthelmé set the course for expansion. His brother Jacky Barthelmé joined the company in 1989. The brothers were determined to make quality wine and wanted the best sites. They started applying biodynamic farming methods in 1997 but did not become certified until 2017. Today, the estate owns 25 hectares/62 acres with holdings in seven grand crus and exports to 45 countries. Maurice Barthelmé and Marie-Claire Mann are now retired, and Jacky Barthelmé’s son Antoine has joined the domaine to work in the vineyards and cellar. Pauline Barthelmé, Maurice’s daughter, joined the estate in 2022 on the commercial side. Antoine Barthelmé studied in Beaune and followed this with stints at Alphonse Mellot in Sancerre, Rippon in Central Otago, Stéphane Derenoncourt’s consultancy in Bordeaux and Georges Noëllat in Vosne-Romanée. Domaine Albert Mann planted Pinot Noir in the grand cru sites of Hengst and Pfersigberg as early as 1963; the house is a beacon for that variety today. Albert Mann is another top estate at the vanguard of Alsace. Jacky Barthelmé’s attention to detail is almost obsessive, as is his desire to express his sites. An extraordinary amount of passion informs the ethos of the estate that can be felt in the exceptional and supremely expressive wines – especially in the gorgeous Pinot Noirs.”

    Anne Krebiehl, Vinous (04/23)

    In Stock

  • Albert Mann Pinot Gris 2022

    £24.95

    “In 1984, Albert Mann was a small winegrower with just 2.5 hectares/6 acres of vines when his daughter Marie-Claire married Maurice Barthelmé. The domaine had bottled its own wines since 1947, and Maurice Barthelmé set the course for expansion. His brother Jacky Barthelmé joined the company in 1989. The brothers were determined to make quality wine and wanted the best sites. They started applying biodynamic farming methods in 1997 but did not become certified until 2017. Today, the estate owns 25 hectares/62 acres with holdings in seven grand crus and exports to 45 countries. Maurice Barthelmé and Marie-Claire Mann are now retired, and Jacky Barthelmé’s son Antoine has joined the domaine to work in the vineyards and cellar. Pauline Barthelmé, Maurice’s daughter, joined the estate in 2022 on the commercial side. Antoine Barthelmé studied in Beaune and followed this with stints at Alphonse Mellot in Sancerre, Rippon in Central Otago, Stéphane Derenoncourt’s consultancy in Bordeaux and Georges Noëllat in Vosne-Romanée. Domaine Albert Mann planted Pinot Noir in the grand cru sites of Hengst and Pfersigberg as early as 1963; the house is a beacon for that variety today. Albert Mann is another top estate at the vanguard of Alsace. Jacky Barthelmé’s attention to detail is almost obsessive, as is his desire to express his sites. An extraordinary amount of passion informs the ethos of the estate that can be felt in the exceptional and supremely expressive wines – especially in the gorgeous Pinot Noirs.”

    Anne Krebiehl, Vinous (04/23)

    In Stock

  • Albert Mann Pinot Gris Cuvee Albert 2019

    £31.49

    “The 2019 Pinot Gris Cuvée Albert is from old vines cultivated in the limestone terroirs Rosenberg and Altenbourg. The wine shows a deep and intense yet also pure and expressive bouquet with serious, saline and stony terroir notes intertwined with ripe fruit aromas. Dense and textured on the palate, this is a pure, intense, lush and substantial as well as elegant Pinot Gris with fine tannins, lingering salinity and mineral structure. This is a superb dry Pinot Gris that was bottled in May 2020. Drink: 2022-2040. 92 points”

    Stephan Reinhardt, Wine Advocate (03/23)

    In Stock

  • Albert Mann Riesling 2022

    £25.95

    “In 1984, Albert Mann was a small winegrower with just 2.5 hectares/6 acres of vines when his daughter Marie-Claire married Maurice Barthelmé. The domaine had bottled its own wines since 1947, and Maurice Barthelmé set the course for expansion. His brother Jacky Barthelmé joined the company in 1989. The brothers were determined to make quality wine and wanted the best sites. They started applying biodynamic farming methods in 1997 but did not become certified until 2017. Today, the estate owns 25 hectares/62 acres with holdings in seven grand crus and exports to 45 countries. Maurice Barthelmé and Marie-Claire Mann are now retired, and Jacky Barthelmé’s son Antoine has joined the domaine to work in the vineyards and cellar. Pauline Barthelmé, Maurice’s daughter, joined the estate in 2022 on the commercial side. Antoine Barthelmé studied in Beaune and followed this with stints at Alphonse Mellot in Sancerre, Rippon in Central Otago, Stéphane Derenoncourt’s consultancy in Bordeaux and Georges Noëllat in Vosne-Romanée. Domaine Albert Mann planted Pinot Noir in the grand cru sites of Hengst and Pfersigberg as early as 1963; the house is a beacon for that variety today. Albert Mann is another top estate at the vanguard of Alsace. Jacky Barthelmé’s attention to detail is almost obsessive, as is his desire to express his sites. An extraordinary amount of passion informs the ethos of the estate that can be felt in the exceptional and supremely expressive wines – especially in the gorgeous Pinot Noirs.”

    Anne Krebiehl, Vinous (04/23)

    In Stock

  • Albert Mann Riesling Schlossberg Grand Cru 2020

    £79.95

    “The 2020 Riesling is made from four plots with an average vine age of 35 years, running along the mid-slope of the granitic Schlossberg Grand Cru. The nose is full of ripe, expressive orange peel. The palate is dense, concentrated, yet utterly linear with a stony, lemony acidity that cuts through everything. The finish is salty like wet stone, mouth-watering, crystalline and utterly appetizing. (Bone-dry). Drinking window: 2025-2060. 95 points

    In 1984, Albert Mann was a small winegrower with just 2.5 hectares/6 acres of vines when his daughter Marie-Claire married Maurice Barthelmé. The domaine had bottled its own wines since 1947, and Maurice Barthelmé set the course for expansion. His brother Jacky Barthelmé joined the company in 1989. The brothers were determined to make quality wine and wanted the best sites. They started applying biodynamic farming methods in 1997 but did not become certified until 2017. Today, the estate owns 25 hectares/62 acres with holdings in seven grand crus and exports to 45 countries. Maurice Barthelmé and Marie-Claire Mann are now retired, and Jacky Barthelmé’s son Antoine has joined the domaine to work in the vineyards and cellar. Pauline Barthelmé, Maurice’s daughter, joined the estate in 2022 on the commercial side. Antoine Barthelmé studied in Beaune and followed this with stints at Alphonse Mellot in Sancerre, Rippon in Central Otago, Stéphane Derenoncourt’s consultancy in Bordeaux and Georges Noëllat in Vosne-Romanée. Domaine Albert Mann planted Pinot Noir in the grand cru sites of Hengst and Pfersigberg as early as 1963; the house is a beacon for that variety today. Albert Mann is another top estate at the vanguard of Alsace. Jacky Barthelmé’s attention to detail is almost obsessive, as is his desire to express his sites. An extraordinary amount of passion informs the ethos of the estate that can be felt in the exceptional and supremely expressive wines – especially in the gorgeous Pinot Noirs.”

    Anne Krebiehl, Vinous (04/23)

    In Stock

  • Pierre Frick Pinot Noir Fischback 2021

    £34.25

    “Jean-Pierre Frick – for much more on whose methodology and its recent evolution, consult my reports in issues 194 and 188 – was the first avowedly biodynamic grower I ever met. This was in the mid-’80s and at a time when he had been served with a warning from the officially biodynamic watchdogs who misread references to the Steinert Vineyard as illegitimate uses of the Master’s name! I am pretty sure that Frick is scarcely less amazed than I am at the recent tide of biodynamic viticulture, or by the fact that his long-standing and successful experiments with sulfur-free wine – like those of Pierry Overnoy in the Jura – now count as cutting edge and trendy. Those wines, incidentally, will from 2012 be labeled “vin nature,” not because the expression is fashionable but because Frick has taken umbrage at what he considers the laxity regarding permissible additives with which the term “vin biologique” has been officially re-defined.”

    David Schildknecht, Wine Advocate (08/14)

    In Stock

  • Rolly Gassmann Gewurztraminer Kappelweg de Rorschwihr 2021

    £37.95

    “The 2021 Gewurztraminer Kappelweg de Rorschwihr opens with a lovely scent of flint wrapped in honeysuckle, white pepper and downy, rosy peach skin. The palate has a lovely bitterness, as of grapefruit peel. It’s intense and fresh, swallowing up that sweetness. The 2021 is super straight and a racy number (what a word to describe Gewurztraminer), full of aromatic allure and that addictive grapefruit zestiness. 37 g/L of residual sweetness. (Medium) Drinking window: 2024-2060. 96 points

    The Rolly Gassmann estate was founded in 1967 when the Gassmann estate, first documented in 1611, and the Rolly estate, first documented in 1676, were united by marriage. The 54 hectares of the domaine are in the limestone, marl and clay soils of Rorschwihr and Bergheim and in the granite soils of Rodern. Gewurztraminer is the most important grape, with 28% of plantings, followed by equal parts of Pinot Gris, Riesling and Auxerrois, with smaller portions of Muscat, Sylvaner and Pinot Noir. Pierre Gassmann has been in charge of the estate since 1997, after studying in Rouffach and Beaune and working internships with Huet in the Loire and Bründlmayer in Austria, amongst others. As of 1997, vines have been farmed according to biodynamic principles, but the estate is not certified. Fruit ferments spontaneously and stays on lees until the following year, being bottled between March and July. His panoramic, huge tasting room is full of giant tables laden with stones, rocks and fossils from his vineyards, and it is color-coordinated, like a museum of soils. During my visit, I tasted a selection of current releases spanning vintages from 1996 to 2021. Pierre Gassmann operates on a different plane. What he practices borders on alchemy and defies most conventional teaching about wine. His favorite word is “balance,” and late, non-selective harvest is key to his wines. “We want top maturity. We do not do green harvests. We get the balance in the vineyard from high planting densities. We are the last to harvest. Harvesting when leaves are green is no good for us because, at that point, neither malic nor tartaric acids are stable,” he says in a staccato delivery of his tenets. “We make wine in the same way the monks did [referring to the various abbeys who held vineyards in Rorschwihr]. We work to achieve the development of botrytis, and we love botrytis and passerillage.” To him, botrytis or passerillage is the “completion” of the grape’s growing cycle and, crucially, the “stabilization” of acidity. The wines are thus either off-dry or sweet. Pierre Gassmann notes that the last time the domaine made a dry white wine was in 1980. Today, the only dry wines he makes are Pinot Noirs – which also run counter to everything that is taught about winemaking. Despite all this, the wines achieve their balance. While the Pinot Noirs are not for everyone with their powerful, meaty smokiness, the white wines beguile, confound and astonish with their expressive aromatics, age-ability and length. Their extraordinary concentration seems to ward off evolution. The mature wines tasted still have a way to go. It is telling that I typed “this estate messes with your mind” in the margin of one of my tasting notes. The 2003 Muscat Moenchreben de Rorschwihr Vendanges Tardives is one of the most aromatically evocative wines I ever tasted.”

    Anne Krebiehl, Vinous (04/24)

    In Stock

  • Rolly Gassmann Riesling Kappelweg de Rorschwihr 2019

    £38.95

    “From marly soils, the 2019 Riesling Kappelweg de Rorschwihr shows a rich, darker-toned and flinty bouquet with botrytis notes as well as aromas of white flowers, candied grapefruits and stewed lemons. Creamy-textured, lush and intense on the palate, this is a more opulent, rather mellow but also still edgy Riesling with well-hidden acidity and a long, saline and piquant finish. This is Rolly Gassmann’s most successful Riesling. 12.5% stated alcohol plus 46 grams per liter of residual sugar. Natural cork. Tasted at the domaine in May 2022. Drinking window: 2035-2070. 94+ points

    If the winemaker has to fetch his wine from storage with a forklift, then you’re with Pierre Gassmann in his giant “UFO,” from which you can spit down on the church. There have certainly been more popular neighbors in Rorschwihr but hardly ever a better winemaker. The first two hours of the tasting, which, by the way, took place in the exhibition hall next to the exhibits of stones, bones, real mammoth teeth and plastic dinosaurs, were spent on explanations, as Gassmann told the history of the earth and finally also of his vineyards (and in more detail than any geologist or galaxy researcher). Then I spied legions of ready wines, but I managed only some of them. As always, they are of outstanding quality, not just the obligatory rich but exceedingly mineral white crus (that officially are not), which may have been part of the reason Gassmann had a six-story UFO with a gluttonous interior built instead of a winery, for compensation purposes, so to speak. Even if no single wine is allowed to bear the grand cru designation, the wines are nothing less than that. However, to unravel the whole story, it will take several days of questioning and lectures. Until then, you should try the Pinot Noir of Rolly-Gassmann. They are wines like from another time, but they are damn great and unique anyway—even with 15% or even 16% alcohol. There you go! We have to learn to let all the spatial and gustatory dimensions that open up here on the palate sink in before we can begin to try to grasp them without being distracted from tasting and palpating by naked numbers. Once Pierre Gassmann has noticed that you get involved with his wines, he soon sits on the forklift and disappears into the belly of the UFO, only to explore the dimensions of time minutes later with another lattice box. No, it’s not winetasting at Gassmann’s. It’s rather a kind of exploration of the world through fermented grape juices that are so much more than just wine.”

    Stephan Reinhardt, Wine Advocate (03/23)

    In Stock

  • Trimbach Riesling Cuvee Frederic Emile 2017

    £48.95

    “Bright straw. Clean, vibrantly mineral and racy aromas and flavors of green apple, pear and lime. Ripe yet brightly acidic, this exhibits a penetrating quality on the long, juicy, ginger- and mineral-accented finish. Very compact, dense and still youthful Riesling. Outstanding. Drinking window: 2026-2039. 95+ points

    The venerable Trimbach firm, located in Ribeauvillé, owns 60 hectares and is now among the five biggest private vineyard land owners in Alsace. Long staunch opponents of the Grand Cru system (which, when it was first unveiled, they felt, not unreasonably, to be flawed), the family is now bottling numerous wines from different grand crus, such as the Mandelberg and the Geisberg, and will likely release their first-ever Riesling Brand in 2018 (they bought vineyards there in 2016). They have also bought 0.1 hectares of roughly 50-year-old Sylvaner vines in the Trottacker lieu-dit and are very happy with the fruit it supplies. Incidentally, the new releases of the estate’s two most famous wines, the Riesling Cuvée Fréderic Emile and the Clos Saint Hune, are absolutely superb.”

    Ian D’Agata, Vinous (01/19)

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