Puligny-Montrachet


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  • Francois Legros Puligny-Montrachet Noyer Bret 2021

    £69.95

    “The 2021 Puligny-Montrachet Noyer Bret comes from 70-year-old vines that underwent a clonal selection. It is quite concentrated on the nose with slightly honeyed tones complementing the blood orange and green apple scents. The palate is very concentrated for a Village Cru, a silver bead of acidity, quite tangy with orange rind and tangerine notes towards the lingering finish. Excellent. Drinking window: 2024-2038. 92 points

    This is my second visit in a year to this Domaine based on the outskirts of Nuits Saint-George. Newbuild homes are surrounding François Legros’s winery, thankfully not impeding on any sacred vineyards. “The whites are vinified in stainless steel but transferred into barrel halfway through the alcohol fermentation,” Legros tells me. “They are matured in 30% new oak, and the rest one and two years old. I started the picking on 21 or 22 September.” The standout in 2021 is a wonderful Chambolle-Musigny Les Noirots and Morey-Saint-Denis Millandes. The already bottled whites are generally fresh and approachable, particularly strong in Saint-Aubin.”

    Neal Martin, Vinous (01/23)

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  • Terres de Velle Puligny-Montrachet 2018

    £74.95

    Review to follow

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  • Terres de Velle Puligny-Montrachet Premier Cru Les Referts 2018

    £94.75

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Bernard & Thierry Glantenay Puligny-Montrachet Premier Cru Les Folatieres 2017

    £79.99

    “Pretty and expressive, the 2017 Puligny-Montrachet 1er Cru Les Folatières offers up notes of crisp pear, ripe lemon and a touch of struck matchstick from its recent bottling, followed by a medium to full-bodied, satiny palate with tangy acids, nice chewy extract and a chalky finish. It’s one of the finest white wines I’ve tasted from Glantenay. Drink: 2019-2029. 93 points

    The disarmingly modest Thierry Glantenay is emerging as one of the Côte de Beaune’s most exciting producers of red wine. From his hillside winery overlooking the Marquis d’Angerville’s Clos des Ducs, Glantenay is producing a lovely range of elegant, pure and intense Volnays and Pommards that are increasingly consistent and stylistically assured. In the cuverie, he tells me, he is more and more content to let temperature and alcohol do the work of extraction for him, keeping pigéage and rémontage to a minimum; pressing is gentle; and élevage, without racking until the mise en bouteille, takes place in at most 30% new barrels. In the cellar, no matter which barrel you choose, the wines taste reliably wonderful: indeed, after my first tasting with Glantenay, some years ago, I was compelled to return a week later to verify that I hadn’t been imagining things, and that so serious a producer could really be so little known. That his wines sometimes take longer to bounce back after bottling than those of his peers, therefore, surprises me. Glantenay neither fines nor filters, but might the mobile bottling line he uses for the mise perhaps do a gentler job? In any case, the quality is not in doubt, and after the superb vintages of 2015 and 2016, 2017 is a worthy successor, in a lighter, more supple register, certainly, but with plenty of flavor and personality, and at last, available in normal quantities.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (01/19)

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  • Etienne Sauzet Puligny-Montrachet 2021

    £95.95

    “The 2021 Puligny-Montrachet Village has a taut and strict nose, well defined, green apple mixed with subtle petrichor/wet pavement scents. The palate is well balanced with lemon zest, lime and a dab of ginger, gently building towards a nicely composed and delineated finish. This should give 8-10 years’ drinking pleasure. Drinking window: 2024-2034. 89-91 points

    “We had frost in April, and for me, it was the snow that did the real damage,” winemaker Benoît Riffaut explains in the tasting room. “Without this, I think the Premier Crus would have been less impacted, maybe 20%? But in the end, we are 80% down in terms of production, whilst Village and Regional Crus are only 50% down. Afterwards, it was not easy due to the mildew, as the vines were less strong. We had to be careful. We began picking around 22 September, 13 months after 2020. The grapes were healthy with correct ripeness, around 12% to 13.2% potential, and slightly more malic than 2020. During élevage, after August racking, I thought the wines were surprisingly good – I liked the energy, the electricity. That’s purely because of the terroir. The wines have been racked in stainless steel tank and will be bottled next January to March.”

    Riffaut has been on a roll in recent vintages, and I find many of Sauzet’s 2021s exemplary. Best in show? No, not the Montrachet or the Bienvenue-Bâtard-Montrachet. Not the Chevalier-Montrachet that sadly is no more following the frost and, subsequently, the acquisition of Bouchard Père denying them their source (though Riffaut seems to have a replacement lined up). No, it’s the startling Bâtard-Montrachet that is the thrill, surfeit with tension and poise, a livewire with bags of energy. Also, try to grab his Puligny-Montrachet Les Combettes, Les Referts or the Folatières En La Richards, though they are in minuscule quantities. Chapeau Benoît!”

    Neal Martin, Vinous (01/23)

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