Cote de Nuits


Showing 1–12 of 33 results

  • AMI Cote de Nuits-Villages 2020

    £44.95

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Antoine Petitprez Maison Uliz Hautes Cotes de Nuits Champs Perdrix 2019

    £43.95

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Antoine Petitprez Maison Uliz Hautes Cotes de Nuits Les Vaucrains 2018

    £49.95

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Chantal Remy Chambertin Grand Cru 2020

    £300.00

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Chantal Remy Clos de la Roche Grand Cru 2020

    £200.00

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Chantal Remy Latricieres-Chambertin Grand Cru 2020

    £205.00

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Chantal Remy Morey-Saint-Denis Clos des Rosiers 2020

    £105.00

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Chateau de la Tour Clos-Vougeot Vieilles Vignes Grand Cru 2016

    £204.99

    “(13.2% alcohol; 18 hectoliters per hectare produced; from vines harvested on September 23): Bright, moderately saturated medium red. Explosive, fruit-dominated aromas of dark berries, cherry, spices, mint, menthol, flowers and minerals. Conveys compelling sappy energy in a silky, medium-bodied package, with its black fruit and herb flavors complicated by a touch of saline minerality. Boasts glorious density of fruit–and near-perfect balance in spite of the very low yield. The very long, rising, perfumed finish offers a serious tannic spine for aging but no rough edges. This penetrating, urgent, classic Clos Vougeot, a standout for the vintage, boasts real pinosity. François Labet told me that, beginning with his 2015s, he did not use enzymes and did not add any sulfur until the middle of the élevage, well after the malolactic fermentations finished. He bottled this 2016 with just 20 parts per million free sulfur and 35 total. Drinking window: 2026-2044. 96 points”

    Stephen Tanzer, Vinous (06/19)

    In Stock

  • Francois Legros Chambolle-Musigny Premier Cru Les Noirots 2018

    £84.95

    “Another name that’s new to my report is Domaine François Legros, in Nuits Saint-Georges. Legros, who took over the domaine in 1988, is one of those “dirt under the fingernails” winemakers, a man who is happiest out working in the vines. “My ancestors worked at Château de la Tour and my parents still live in Vougeot,” he told me. “They lived in the chateau.” He has expanded the holdings to around eight hectares that, unusually, span both white and red in the Côte de Beaune and Côte de Nuits, this diaspora due partly to working parcels previously owned by his father-in-law. He is now assisted by his daughter Charlotte, who trained at the University of Beaune. Legros has converted all his vineyards to lutte raisonée, works some parcels by horse, and hand-picks and sorts his fruit in the vineyard and then on a vibrating table. For the reds, around 90% is de-stemmed, with manual pigeage. He keeps the wines on the lees with no racking, employing around 30% new oak for his Premier Crus. He told me that the whites were bottled the previous week and came in with 13.6–13.8% alcohol. Tasting through his 2020s, I preferred his reds to his whites, which displayed traits of sur-maturité. By contrast, the reds were fresher and more terroir-driven and therefore come recommended. I look forward to returning to this address in the future.”

    Neal Martin, Vinous (12/21)

    In Stock

  • Francois Legros Chambolle-Musigny Premier Cru Les Noirots 2019

    £87.95

    “Another success, the 2019 Chambolle-Musigny 1er Cru Les Noirots is a lovely wine that evokes notions of raspberries, sweet spices, orange rind and rose petals. Medium to full-bodied, velvety and concentrated, with melting tannins and lively acids, it concludes with a long, precise finish. This under-the-radar cuvée is well worth seeking out. Drinking window: 2021-2039. 92+ points

    Domaine François Legros comprises fully 57 parcels, up to 50 kilometers apart—a considerable logistical challenge! Yet Legros has cultivated the soils for the last 15 years and works along largely organic lines, excepting only some synthetic anti-mildew treatments in years with elevated disease pressure. Much of the domaine’s Pinot Noir is pruned in cordon, and yields are controlled. Winemaking is simple: a brief cold soak, when punch-downs are employed, followed by three to four weeks’ maceration, with tanks heated to 31 degrees centigrade at the end. After pressing, the young wines are drawn off into barrels from Chassis, Cavin and François Frères, each barrel seeing four liters of lees. The most serious reds see two winters in barrel, with bottling in March. The style here is very classical and charming: no smoke or mirrors, just classic, well-made Burgundy. The insider’s choice is the lovely Vougeot 1er Cru Les Cras, a cuvée well worth seeking out, but everything here comes recommended.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (09/21)

    In Stock

  • Francois Legros Chambolle-Musigny Vieilles Vignes 2020

    £67.95

    “The 2020 Chambolle-Musigny Vieilles Vignes comes from four parcels of vines over 70 years old that is matured in around 30% new oak. Elegant and refined on the nose it develops a lovely violet scent with aeration. The palate is well balanced with a gentle grip, fine tannins and acidity with a pure, quite mineral-driven finish. This is worth checking out. Drinking window: 2024-2034. 90-92 points

    Another name that’s new to my report is Domaine François Legros, in Nuits Saint-Georges. Legros, who took over the domaine in 1988, is one of those “dirt under the fingernails” winemakers, a man who is happiest out working in the vines. “My ancestors worked at Château de la Tour and my parents still live in Vougeot,” he told me. “They lived in the chateau.” He has expanded the holdings to around eight hectares that, unusually, span both white and red in the Côte de Beaune and Côte de Nuits, this diaspora due partly to working parcels previously owned by his father-in-law. He is now assisted by his daughter Charlotte, who trained at the University of Beaune. Legros has converted all his vineyards to lutte raisonée, works some parcels by horse, and hand-picks and sorts his fruit in the vineyard and then on a vibrating table. For the reds, around 90% is de-stemmed, with manual pigeage. He keeps the wines on the lees with no racking, employing around 30% new oak for his Premier Crus. He told me that the whites were bottled the previous week and came in with 13.6–13.8% alcohol. Tasting through his 2020s, I preferred his reds to his whites, which displayed traits of sur-maturité. By contrast, the reds were fresher and more terroir-driven and therefore come recommended. I look forward to returning to this address in the future.”

    Neal Martin, Vinous (12/21)

    In Stock

  • Francois Legros Morey-Saint-Denis Premier Cru Clos Sorbe 2019

    £67.95

    “The 2019 Morey-Saint-Denis Clos Sorbé 1er Cru, from just under Clos des Lambrays, has an attractive blackberry, quite marine-influenced bouquet. The palate is medium-bodied with black fruit laced with black pepper, touches of liquorice furnishing the finish. There is satisfying length here – excellent. Drinking window: 2023-2036. 91 points

    Another name that’s new to my report is Domaine François Legros, in Nuits Saint-Georges. Legros, who took over the domaine in 1988, is one of those “dirt under the fingernails” winemakers, a man who is happiest out working in the vines. “My ancestors worked at Château de la Tour and my parents still live in Vougeot,” he told me. “They lived in the chateau.” He has expanded the holdings to around eight hectares that, unusually, span both white and red in the Côte de Beaune and Côte de Nuits, this diaspora due partly to working parcels previously owned by his father-in-law. He is now assisted by his daughter Charlotte, who trained at the University of Beaune. Legros has converted all his vineyards to lutte raisonée, works some parcels by horse, and hand-picks and sorts his fruit in the vineyard and then on a vibrating table. For the reds, around 90% is de-stemmed, with manual pigeage. He keeps the wines on the lees with no racking, employing around 30% new oak for his Premier Crus. He told me that the whites were bottled the previous week and came in with 13.6–13.8% alcohol. Tasting through his 2020s, I preferred his reds to his whites, which displayed traits of sur-maturité. By contrast, the reds were fresher and more terroir-driven and therefore come recommended. I look forward to returning to this address in the future.”

    Neal Martin, Vinous (12/21)

    In Stock