Gevrey-Chambertin


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  • Chantal Remy Chambertin Grand Cru 2020

    £300.00

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Chantal Remy Latricieres-Chambertin Grand Cru 2020

    £205.00

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Louis Jadot Chambertin-Clos de Beze Grand Cru 2021

    £410.00

    “Offering up aromas of rich cherries, berries and plums mingled with spices and orange zest, and framed by toasty new oak, the 2021 Chambertin Clos de Bèze Grand Cru (Domaine Louis Jadot) is full-bodied, layered and multidimensional, with a seamless, enveloping profile and melting structuring tannins. 93-95 points

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (01/23)

    In Stock

  • Louis Jadot Gevrey-Chambertin 2017

    £54.95

    “Revisited from bottle, Jadot’s 2017 Gevrey-Chambertin Village (Maison Louis Jadot) is showing beautifully, wafting from the glass with scents of raspberries and cassis mingled with hints of candied peel, smoked meats and loamy soil. Medium to full-bodied, supple and enveloping, its succulent core of fruit is underpinned by powdery tannins and lively acids. As readers will remember, this cuvée is largely produced from purchased fruit, but it’s vinified in house by Barnier and his team. Drink: 2021-2042. 89 points

    Jadot’s Frédéric Barnier is pleased with his 2017 portfolio. It’s a good white vintage, he says, neither over nor underripe, and in some instances—as is the norm at this address—malolactic fermentation was blocked to retain additional freshness. The reds, he says, have gained immensely with élevage, taking on depth and dimension that they initially seemed to lack after their comparatively precocious malolactic fermentations concluded. Winemaking here is something of a constant: destemmed grapes, wooden fermentation vessels with minimal temperature control and punching down, long cuvaisons and maturation in oak barrels—of which one-third are new, one-third are once-used and one-third are twice-used. Whites are direct pressed, fermented and matured in barrels. The result is a long-lived, muscular style that ages very well indeed, and there is no doubt that this is one of the finest négociant houses—not just in terms of quality, but also in terms of consistency. My notes parse the portfolio, identifying particular high points, but even taken as a whole Barnier and his team have every right to be pleased with a very good 2017 collection in both red and white.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (02/20)

    In Stock

  • Maume Gevrey-Chambertin En Pallud 2019

    £79.95

    “The 2019 Gevrey-Chambertin En Pallud is the largest cru of the domaine, from 0.64 hectares of vine located just below Mazis-Chambertin. It is raised in used barrels apart from one (I tasted from new Francois Freres and used). The precise bouquet presents red cherries, raspberry, crushed stone and wilted rose petals, beautifully focused. The palate is very finessed with silky tannins and pure red fruit. As Pinoté as Pinot Noir can be. I absolutely love this. Drinking window: 2022-2038. 92-94 points

    Back in the day, Maume was the bastion of “traditional Burgundy”. When perceived wisdom was towards lacquering new oak on sensitive Pinot Noir and producers dogmatically adopted Henri Jayer’s principles of complete de-stemming, Maume was one of a handful that stuck to their principles of using whole bunches. The wines were inconsistent as testified by a memorable vertical of Mazis-Chambertin in London a few years ago, but for every wine that they got wrong and tasted vegetal, when they got it right and given requisite bottle age, the wines could be profound. In many ways Maume was ahead of their time, as nowadays numerous producers now proselytize the same tenets. The original holdings were almost entirely bought out by Canadian entrepreneur Murray Tawse to create Domaine Tawse, whose wines can be found in this report.

    Contractually, Maume retained a few morsels of vine and to be honest, since then I have not paid them much attention. However, I did return on this trip, back to their rather dishevelled winery on the RN74. Bertrand’s Maume’s father, Bernard, answered the door. Don’t be deceived by his advancing years. Maume Senior is as sharp as a pin. He spoke eloquently about the terroir of Gevrey and had lost none of his faculties that served him during an illustrious career as a professor at the University of Dijon. Bertrand has had more than his fair share of demons. Despite life’s battle scars when we met, I could not help recall some of the amazing bottles he helped create, as well as observing the bond between father and son. Tasting their 2019s that were picked from 14 September from barrel, it was patently clear that Maume never lost the knack of producing what you might call “fermented wonderment”. I tasted few Village Crus as spellbinding as their 2019 Gevrey-Chambertin En Pallud or a generic red as fine as their 2019 Bourgogne Rouge from the lieu-dit of Les Vignes Blanches, grown on white limestone soils as its name implies. Maume retained a cult following, especially here in the UK, evidenced by the pallets ready to be picked by their transporter. Tasting these 2018s and 2019s I can understand why they continue to have a loyal following.”

    Neal Martin, Vinous (12/20)

    In Stock

  • Maume Gevrey-Chambertin En Pallud 2020

    £84.95

    “The 2020 Gevrey-Chambertin En Pallud is outshone by the regular Gevrey Village at this early stage. That should not detract from a fine wine with its beautiful nose of cranberry and Morello cherries, a touch of cassis and violet. There is a slight grittiness to the tannins and modest depth with impressive backbone towards the finish that just needs a little more precision. Drinking window: 2023-2033. 90 points

    Though I could not visit the Domaine this year, I was able to taste some of Maume’s bottled 2020s during the week of the Grands Jours. These wines are well worth seeking out. Readers should be aware winemaking duties are being handed over to Bertrand Maume’s wife, Patricia Siblas, who has ostensibly been making the wines in recent years, and therefore, I expect the high quality to continue. She will be joined by her brother, Richard and Thomas. From the 2021 releases, the wines will be under Domaine Maume-Siblas. You will find few better Gevrey-Chambertin Village 2020s this year.”

    Neal Martin, Vinous (05/22)

    In Stock

  • Maume Gevrey-Chambertin Premier Cru Cherbaudes 2019

    £104.95

    “The 2019 Gevrey-Chambertin Gerbaudes 1er Cru comes from a single oevrée and has a ripe raspberry coulis and wild strawberry bouquet, well defined with seamlessly integrated oak. The palate is sweet, almost candied on the entry, though it expresses the essence of Pinoté. The sensual, pure finish is a little spicier than the En Pallud. Exquisite – but just one barrel bottled. Drinking window: 2022-2040. 92-94 points

    Back in the day, Maume was the bastion of “traditional Burgundy”. When perceived wisdom was towards lacquering new oak on sensitive Pinot Noir and producers dogmatically adopted Henri Jayer’s principles of complete de-stemming, Maume was one of a handful that stuck to their principles of using whole bunches. The wines were inconsistent as testified by a memorable vertical of Mazis-Chambertin in London a few years ago, but for every wine that they got wrong and tasted vegetal, when they got it right and given requisite bottle age, the wines could be profound. In many ways Maume was ahead of their time, as nowadays numerous producers now proselytize the same tenets. The original holdings were almost entirely bought out by Canadian entrepreneur Murray Tawse to create Domaine Tawse, whose wines can be found in this report.

    Contractually, Maume retained a few morsels of vine and to be honest, since then I have not paid them much attention. However, I did return on this trip, back to their rather dishevelled winery on the RN74. Bertrand’s Maume’s father, Bernard, answered the door. Don’t be deceived by his advancing years. Maume Senior is as sharp as a pin. He spoke eloquently about the terroir of Gevrey and had lost none of his faculties that served him during an illustrious career as a professor at the University of Dijon. Bertrand has had more than his fair share of demons. Despite life’s battle scars when we met, I could not help recall some of the amazing bottles he helped create, as well as observing the bond between father and son. Tasting their 2019s that were picked from 14 September from barrel, it was patently clear that Maume never lost the knack of producing what you might call “fermented wonderment”. I tasted few Village Crus as spellbinding as their 2019 Gevrey-Chambertin En Pallud or a generic red as fine as their 2019 Bourgogne Rouge from the lieu-dit of Les Vignes Blanches, grown on white limestone soils as its name implies. Maume retained a cult following, especially here in the UK, evidenced by the pallets ready to be picked by their transporter. Tasting these 2018s and 2019s I can understand why they continue to have a loyal following.”

    Neal Martin, Vinous (12/20)

    In Stock

  • Maume Gevrey-Chambertin Premier Cru Cherbaudes 2020

    £109.95

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Maume-Siblas Gevrey-Chambertin En Pallud 2021

    £89.95

    “The 2021 Gevrey-Chambertin En Pallud comes from a 0.66-ha parcel albeit with a number of missing vines that are gradually being replaced. It is often one of my picks from the Domaine and indeed the appellation and this is another to add to the canon of over-performing vintages. It has a wonderful, very engaging nose with brambly red fruit, undergrowth and touches of orange blossom – so seductive. The palate is medium-bodied with supple tannins, pixelated like I found the 2020 twelve months ago with a finish that is detailed and surfeit with tension. This year, the En Pallud is a significant step up from the Village. Crystalline. Drinking window: 2024-2036. 91-93 points

    It is a brief visit to Domaine Maume, but definitely worth it, just to taste their consistently over-performing Gevrey-Chambertin En Pallud. These wines were made by Bertrand Maume, though duties have been transferred to his wife, Patricia Siblas, who has overseen the production since 2017, as well as her own label, a couple of examples included in this report. As I mentioned before, she will be aided by her two sons henceforth. She tells me that all the cuvées are whole bunches, not that you can tell.”

    Neal Martin, Vinous (01/23)

    In Stock

  • Maume-Siblas Gevrey-Chambertin Premier Cru Cherbaudes 2021

    £129.95

    “The 2021 Gevrey-Chambertin Cherbaudes 1er Cru, sadly reduced to a single barrel, new from the Rousseau cooperage, though you can barely detect the oak. It has an attractive nose with brambly red fruit, sous-bois, hints of tobacco and wilted roses, quite a bit of reduction but that will go by the time of racking. The palate is medium-bodied with supple tannins, just about perfectly-pitched acidity, harmonious with a refined but persistent finish that is quintessential Pinoté. Tres. Bon. Vin. lci. Drinking window: 2025-2040. 92-94 points

    It is a brief visit to Domaine Maume, but definitely worth it, just to taste their consistently over-performing Gevrey-Chambertin En Pallud. These wines were made by Bertrand Maume, though duties have been transferred to his wife, Patricia Siblas, who has overseen the production since 2017, as well as her own label, a couple of examples included in this report. As I mentioned before, she will be aided by her two sons henceforth. She tells me that all the cuvées are whole bunches, not that you can tell.”

    Neal Martin, Vinous (01/23)

    In Stock

  • Tawse Gevrey-Chambertin 2019

    £62.49

    “The 2019 Gevrey-Chambertin Village contains 20% whole bunch and 30% new oak. It has a lovely, lilting brambly red berry nose infused with orange blossom and sous-bois aromas; very charming. The palate is silky-smooth on the entry with a fine bead of acidity, hints of dark chocolate infusing the red fruit and a persistent finish. Excellent. Drinking window: 2022-2032. 90-92 points

    Nowadays I reserve an entire morning to taste through the complete range of Domaine Tawse and their wide range of négociant wines under Marchand-Tawse. That is not only because of the sheer number of wines, but also because discussing the vintage with winemakers Pascal Marchand and Mark Fincham is always an illuminating exercise. “In 2019 we started late, which was different to 2018 and 2020,” Fincham told me. “It was especially late in terms of flowering. It was a cold spring and then we had a hot summer, though not as warm as 2018 or 2003. The growing season developed differently because of the lateness. It was very dry and in summer, some places where people regularly go fishing, had completely dried up and this reduced yields further and enhanced concentration. Fortunately we had small showers just at the right point. What we learned from 2018 was that we had to be very reactive in the vineyard, even though a couple of cuvées like the Longecourt reached 15.0°. But, most of the cuvées reached 13.5° to 14.0°. In 2018 people had more problems with stuck fermentation but in 2019, despite the higher alcohol, the fermentations were smoother. In 2018 the proportion of skin to juice was much higher. In 2019 there was two-thirds juice to one-third solid matter, which is a bigger proportion than normal and this lead to more concentration. In 2018 it was around one-quarter solid to three-quarters juice. We started the picking on 12 September in Beaune and finished with the Musigny on 26 September. In 2018 and 2020 you had to jump around between vineyards whereas in 2019 it was a classic order of picking. We couldn’t give the pickers a break. Since 2018 we have a world full of surprises. We used to be able to read the vintage more easily. Things are less predictable these days, though the surprises are on the good side.”

    In recent years I have been consistently impressed with the wines on both the Domaine and négociant side of this ever-expanding enterprise. As is customary, the inward investment of a wealthy entrepreneur, in this case Murray Tawse, upset the Burgundy purists that believe a Burgundy proprietor should been toiling out in their vines from dawn to dusk making sure their hands are as calloused as possible. But in vino veritas – these wines prove themselves time and again where it counts – in the wine glass. Their miniscule holdings in Musigny managed to produce a sublime 2019, whilst both their Clos Saint-Denis and Clos de la Roche are outstanding, the former just edging it at the moment. Also the Charmes-Chambertin is one of the best you will find. Away from the Grand Crus there is plenty to savour, especially in the Gevrey appellation, evidenced by wonderful showing of Lavaux Saint-Jacques and Les Champeaux. I also appreciated strong performances in the Beaune appellation, not least a superb Teurons with lip-smacking salinity.”

    Neal Martin, Vinous (10/20)

    In Stock

  • Claude Dugat Gevrey-Chambertin 2017

    £109.95

    “The 2017 Gevrey-Chambertin Village, which matures in 40% new oak, has a lovely red cherry and wild strawberry bouquet that feels delicate and pure. The palate is very well balanced with a fine acidity, lightly spiced with a dash of white pepper towards the finish. It has a directness that is pleasing, a no-frills but quite delicious Village Cru in the making. Excellent. Drinking window: 2012-2026. 89-91 points

    Domaine Claude Dugat is one of the most picturesque wineries, located in the outskirts of Gevrey in an erstwhile tithe barn. Claude Dugat has handed over the reins to his son Bertrand, who works in the cellar, and his daughter Lataetia, out in the vines where organic and now biodynamic tenets are employed – the fifth generation since Maurice Dugat bought the holdings in 1955. This was the first time I tasted with both son and daughter together. There is certainly a revised approach at the domaine, with more emphasis on early picking and modest use of new oak. Bertrand told me that after the dry summer, the vines were thirsty and so the shower just before harvest was much needed. This year he commenced picking on September 3, compared to September 19 in 2016, and was surprised by the good yields. Although Bertrand was only too pleased with a good crop, make no mistake that quantities are tiny even by Burgundy’s standard, with just one-and-a-quarter barrels of the Griotte-Chambertin (the Grand Crus are all matured entirely in new wood.) I have found much to admire in recent vintages. Bertrand Dugat came across tentative in his first couple of vintages, which is better than being over-confident. The purity of fruit and intensity are extremely impressive and whilst not quite as riveting as their splendid 2016s, I admire the expression of each respective terroir, the wines conveying a sense of honesty and transparency. It is no surprise that the Griotte-Chambertin and Chapelle-Chambertin lead the pack, despite the former being shrouded in reduction. Perhaps this year the growing season shaved some length off the Gevrey-Chambertin 1er Cru, though the Lavaux Saint-Jacques reveals wonderful linearity and persistence.”

    Neal Martin, Vinous (01/19)

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