Tuscany


Showing 49–60 of 83 results

  • Montenidoli Vernaccia di San Gimignano Fiore 2020

    £23.25

    “The 2020 Vernaccia di San Gimignano Fiore is a soft, open-knit white to drink now and over the next 6-12 months. Orchard fruit, dried flowers, spice and mint are nicely woven together in a quiet, understated Vermentino that is showing so well today. Drinking window: 2022-2023. 90 points”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (07/22)

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    Montevertine 2017

    £64.75

    “The 2017 Montevertine is rich, creamy and beautifully resonant on the palate. Over the last year it seems to have gained an extra bit of freshness, which is of course such a plus in this very hot, dry vintage. Montevertine is often austere, but the 2017 is unusually open today, not to mention incredibly delicious. There is plenty of tannin beneath all of that vintage 2017 fruit. Even so, opening a bottle young is not a crime by any stretch of the imagination. Black cherry, leather, sweet pipe tobacco, licorice and earthy notes develop with aeration, showing just a glimpse of what is in store for those who can wait. The 2017 is a striking wine in every sense. Floral notes reappear on the finish, adding further dimensions that will continue to unfold over the coming years. Drinking window: 2022-2042. 96 points

    These new releases from Montevertine are off the charts. The 2018 Pian del Ciampolo is a terrific start for readers who want to explore the personality and style of the year. It’s a gorgeous wine. Tasted a year later, Montevertine and Le Pergole Torte are dazzling. The wines are rich and expansive, but also retain their distinctive personalities. Montevertine is located in the hills outside Radda, a cool, late-ripening subzone in Chianti Classico where warm, dry conditions are less of an issue than they are elsewhere. I was deeply impressed by what I tasted.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (09/20)

    The first significant date in the history of this estate is 1967, when Martino’s father Sergio (a Milanese whose family had made money in steel) bought the Montevertine estate as a holiday home. At that time, estate was perhaps something of a misnomer, since Signor Manetti’s purchase basically consisted of a ramshackle farmhouse and sixty acres or so of neglected farmland. However, there was one other hidden asset in the form of Bruno Bini, who lived on the estate and who became, in those early days, the owner’s right hand man and cellarmaster. In 1968, about an acre with north/northeastern exposure was planted to Sangiovese. In 1971, the first vintage from this estate was shown at Vinitaly to much acclaim and the first vintage of Le Pergole Torte followed in 1977.

    In those distant days, Le Pergole Torte was not 100% Sangiovese – in fact, it did not become so until the 1990 vintage. However, Signor Manetti was a devoted protagonist of Sangiovese and its unique power to express the qualities of its native terroir. This was not, of course, the prevailing wisdom: in fact, regulations forbade the making of 100% Sangiovese wines. Instead, they had to be blended with white grape varieties such as Trebbiano. These strictures led directly to the development of the so-called Supertuscans but Le Pergole Torte is a Super-Sangiovese rather than a Supertuscan. The trajectory of this estate had always been towards making an ever better and purer Sangiovese and one which would best express the individual attributes of Radda, which, at 425 metres above sea level, is one of the highest altitude spots in the Chianti Classico appellation.

    Sergio’s philosophy of pure Sangiovese always put at him at odds with the regulatory authorities. In 1981, he stopped producing Chianti Classico and left the DOC. Even when the regulations changed in 1995 and the use of white grape varieties in Chianti was finally banned, he and his wines remained steadfastly outside the DOC. In the early days, Sergio was also helped by Giulio Gambelli, who became his consultant from 1971. Signor Gambelli was one of the main exponents of Sangiovese as a mono-varietal at a time when the rules required blending with white grape varieties. He was also a master taster rather than an oenologist, known in his lifetime as “il grande maestro di Sangiovese” or, more affectionately, as “Il Bicchierino” (Little Glass). Signor Gambelli passed away in January 2012, so the 2011 vintage was his last. Today, the total estate comprises roughly fifty acres, divided into nine parcels. There are three wines: Pian dell Ciampolo, Montevertine and Le Pergole Torte.

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  • Montevertine Pian del Ciampolo 2020

    £45.95

    “The 2020 Pian del Ciampolo is racy, supple and textured, with lovely up front and plenty of charm. In this vintage, the Pian del Ciampolo is quite generous and forward. It’s a wine of substance that captures the intensity of the year. As a reminder, Pian del Ciampolo is essentially equal parts press wine Montevertine and Pergole Torte and fruit that does not make it into the top two wines. It’s a stellar Pian del Ciampolo. Drinking window: 2024-2035. 92 points

    Martino Manetti’s 2019s and 2020s are magnificent. The Montevertine, which has long lived in the shadows of Le Pergole Torte, is quite impressive in both vintages. Because Montevertine is aged exclusively in cask (while Pergole Torte sees a year of barrel and a year in cask), it exudes a feeling of classicism that is especially distinctive. In 2020, Montevertine includes a new parcel on the other side of Radda that seems to add greater richness and weight. Manetti describes 2019 as a year with a regular summer and no excesses. Harvest started on October 5 and lasted 15 days, while picking began about a week earlier in 2020. In tasting, the 2020s show more density and opulence than the 2019s, but both vintages are strong across the board.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (07/22)

    The first significant date in the history of this estate is 1967, when Martino’s father Sergio (a Milanese whose family had made money in steel) bought the Montevertine estate as a holiday home. At that time, estate was perhaps something of a misnomer, since Signor Manetti’s purchase basically consisted of a ramshackle farmhouse and sixty acres or so of neglected farmland. However, there was one other hidden asset in the form of Bruno Bini, who lived on the estate and who became, in those early days, the owner’s right hand man and cellarmaster. In 1968, about an acre with north/northeastern exposure was planted to Sangiovese. In 1971, the first vintage from this estate was shown at Vinitaly to much acclaim and the first vintage of Le Pergole Torte followed in 1977.

    In those distant days, Le Pergole Torte was not 100% Sangiovese – in fact, it did not become so until the 1990 vintage. However, Signor Manetti was a devoted protagonist of Sangiovese and its unique power to express the qualities of its native terroir. This was not, of course, the prevailing wisdom: in fact, regulations forbade the making of 100% Sangiovese wines. Instead, they had to be blended with white grape varieties such as Trebbiano. These strictures led directly to the development of the so-called Supertuscans but Le Pergole Torte is a Super-Sangiovese rather than a Supertuscan. The trajectory of this estate had always been towards making an ever better and purer Sangiovese and one which would best express the individual attributes of Radda, which, at 425 metres above sea level, is one of the highest altitude spots in the Chianti Classico appellation.

    Sergio’s philosophy of pure Sangiovese always put at him at odds with the regulatory authorities. In 1981, he stopped producing Chianti Classico and left the DOC. Even when the regulations changed in 1995 and the use of white grape varieties in Chianti was finally banned, he and his wines remained steadfastly outside the DOC. In the early days, Sergio was also helped by Giulio Gambelli, who became his consultant from 1971. Signor Gambelli was one of the main exponents of Sangiovese as a mono-varietal at a time when the rules required blending with white grape varieties. He was also a master taster rather than an oenologist, known in his lifetime as “il grande maestro di Sangiovese” or, more affectionately, as “Il Bicchierino” (Little Glass). Signor Gambelli passed away in January 2012, so the 2011 vintage was his last. Today, the total estate comprises roughly fifty acres, divided into nine parcels. There are three wines: Pian del Ciampolo, Montevertine and Le Pergole Torte.

    In Stock

  • Pian dell’Orino Brunello di Montalcino Vigneti del Versante 2016

    £99.95

    “Crushed stone, wild herbs and tart black cherries lift up from the 2016 Brunello di Montalcino Vigneti del Versante, but that’s only the beginning. With time, this blossoms further, gaining a sweeter fruit profile and autumnal spices with hints of shaved cedar. Its textures are remarkably refined and silky in feel, with an intense concentration of tart red fruits, yet energy is maintained through brilliant acidity, as grippy tannins build steadily toward the close. The Vigneti del Versante tapers off with amazing length, youthful poise and a balanced structure, promising many, many years of positive evolution. This is really something to behold. I tasted the 2016 from a freshly opened bottle and from one that had been opened for two days prior that showed no signs of decline; in fact, it blossomed further. Simply stunning. Drinking window: 2026-2040. 98 points

    While some in Montalcino don’t agree with the mix of love, passion, science, nature’s rhythm and a bit of jazz that inspires Caroline Pobitzer and Jan Erbach to create the wines that they do, you’d be hard-pressed to find someone that doesn’t respect them for it. During my recent visit to Pian dell’Orino, located on the southern hill of Montalcino and practically a stone’s throw from Biondi-Santi, I found myself digging through biodynamic preparations, insect repellent plants, witnessing vine training inspired by ancient Roman texts and tiptoeing through their silent cellar. What this couple is accomplishing in Montalcino seems more evolutionary instead of revolutionary to me. However, such practices come at a cost. For one thing, to remain as loyal to Mother Nature as they do, it means constant work in the vineyards to counteract the various vine diseases, insects and vintage conditions. But trust me, they’re up to it. All you need to do is watch Jan Erbach, with the endurance of a long-distance runner, move his way through the vineyards, quickly stopping to nurse an Esca-infected vine or work a canopy to properly catch the morning light. Once in the winery, you find yourself in a space that resembles more of a meditative chamber than a barrel aging room, as Jan Erbach begs you to “please do not touch the barrels”. It might seem odd at face value, but this couple believes just as much in the natural rhythms and vibrations of the cellar as they do in the scrutinous definition of Montalcino’s terroir–a project that they have worked hard to publicize, yet have had much opposition in doing so. As for the wines, and due to the later-release schedule, this visit gave me my first opportunity to taste the 2016 Vigneti del Versante and 2015 Bassolino di Sopra. These two single-vineyard expressions of terroir take all of the best qualities of their respective vintages and marry them perfectly to the Pian dell’Orino style of grace, elegance and radiance. I was able to taste from both freshly-opened bottles and those that had been open for over a day, which is always such an insightful study. There was also a cask sample of the 2017 Bassolino di Sopra, which, out of respect for their wishes, I chose not to publish; but I can say that it is a perfect follow-up to the 2017 Rosso tasted earlier this year. Pian dell’Orino continues to be one of the most progressive and experimental wineries in all of Montalcino, yet also one of its best.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (10/21)

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  • Pian dell’Orino Rosso di Montalcino 2018

    £45.49

    “Luminous red color. Perfumed red rose, violet, sour red cherry and minerals on the absolutely captivating nose. Then fresh juicy and very precise, with laser-like delivery of red cherry and raspberry flavors that linger long on the vibrant finish. Steel fermented only, differently from the 2017 Rosso (a year in which yields were so low that they were able to place all the wine in barrel and carry out fermentation there). Drinking window: 2021-2027. 93 points”

    Ian D’Agata, Vinous (04/20)

    In Stock

  • Podere Le Boncie Le Trame 2019

    £42.95

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Poggio al Tesoro Dedicato a Walter 2016

    £139.99

    “Poggio al Tesoro’s 2016 Dedicato a Walter, 100% Cabernet Franc, exudes richness and power in all of its dimensions. Blackberry jam, chocolate, lavender, licorice and menthol all flesh out in an ample, potent wine that shows all the potential of Franc in Tuscany’s Maremma. I would give the 2016 another year or so in bottle, as the tannins are a bit imposing at this stage. Drinking window: 2022-2031. 95+ points

    This is another strong set of wines from Poggio al Tesoro, an estate that has really turned a corner in the last few years. Sondraia and the pure Cabernet Franc Dedicato a Walter are the flagship wines, but I find the entry-level offerings every bit as compelling.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (01/21)

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  • Poggio al Tesoro Pagus Camilla Vermentino 2017

    £49.99

    “The 2017 Vermentino Solosole Pagus Camilla, is a dense, powerful white – qualities that are accentuated by the warm, dry year. Rich and creamy in the glass, the Pagus Camilla shows the more extroverted side of Vermentino off to great effect. It is a terrific effort for a year that was not easy for whites. Drinking window: 2020-2025. 91 points

    These are the most impressive wines I have tasted from Poggio al Tesoro in some time. To be sure, the estate went through a rough patch a few years ago. If these new releases are any indication, that’s all in the past. Proprietor Marilisa Allegrini and consulting winemaker Luca D’Attoma make a formidable team here. These wines are archetypes for what Bolgheri is all about.”

    Monica Larner, Wine Advocate (03/20)

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  • Poggio al Tesoro Sondraia 2018

    £59.95

    “Made with 65% Cabernet Sauvignon, 25% Merlot and 10% Cabernet Franc, this wine sees a combination of steel and wood. The vintage after this ferments and ages in wood only. The 2018 Bolgheri Superiore Sondraia is already quite toasty with vanilla and dark spice behind black cherry and plum. There is a lot of revved up energy in this vintage, and its tannic structure is important. So is the alcohol content that clocks in at 15%. Fruit comes from a 15-hectare site located just above sea level at about 25 meters in elevation. The soils are deep and well-draining with clay and loose sand. Annual production is 45,000 bottles. Drink: 2023-2037. 94 points

    Poggio al Tesoro has various vineyards spread over four main sites. This gives the estate flexibility when it comes to making final blending choices. Daylight hours are long and luminous and Bolgheri sees soft offshore winds that blow steadily throughout most of the year. These conditions keep the vines healthy.”

    Monica Larner, Wine Advocate (07/22)

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  • Salcheto Nobile di Montepulciano 2019

    £24.25

    “Salcheto is one of the first and most fervent organic farmers in this beautiful part of Tuscany. These wines are the product of a totally sustainable winery operation, down to the columns of natural light that penetrate deep underground, foregoing the need for lightbulbs in the fermentation and barrel rooms. If you come for a visit (and there are charming rooms to rent), you will not be disappointed. The Salcheto property enjoys beautiful views of the Montepulciano skyline.”

    Monica Larner, Wine Advocate (12/20)

    In Stock

  • Salcheto Nobile di Montepulciano Salco 2016

    £39.99

    “The Salcheto 2016 Vino Nobile di Montepulciano Vecchie Viti del Salco (made from organic fruit) occupies that special place between primary and tertiary intensity. The bouquet reveals plum and dried cherry aromas, but it also shows oxidative aromas of tar, spice and a touch of dried fruit or apple skin. This open-knit wine is drinking nicely right now, and I wouldn’t recommend that you wait much longer. Made from old vines, this is an accessible wine of personality. Drink: 2020-2025. 93 points

    Salcheto is one of the first and most fervent organic farmers in this beautiful part of Tuscany. These wines are the product of a totally sustainable winery operation, down to the columns of natural light that penetrate deep underground, foregoing the need for lightbulbs in the fermentation and barrel rooms. If you come for a visit (and there are charming rooms to rent), you will not be disappointed. The Salcheto property enjoys beautiful views of the Montepulciano skyline.”

    Monica Larner, Wine Advocate (12/20)

    In Stock

  • Sancaba Pinot Nero 2017

    £54.75

    Review to follow

    In Stock