Toscana


Showing 13–24 of 31 results

  • Isole e Olena Chianti Classico Gran Selezione 2013

    £204.95

    “The 2013 Chianti Classico Gran Selezione is breathtaking. Beautifully ripe, deep and expressive, the 2013 has it all: deep fruit, stunning aromatic presence and tremendous structure. Black cherry, pomegranate, rose petal, mint and lavender all meld together in this super-expressive, resonant Chianti Classico. An absolutely killer wine, the Gran Selezione is a fabulous, contemporary expression of Chianti Classico at its very finest. Drops of Cabernet Sauvignon and Syrah round out the blend. Paolo De Marchi gave the 2013 a year in barrique and second year in cask. Drinking window: 2021-2038. 98+ points

    Always outspoken, Paolo De Marchi is not shy when it comes to expressing his views. For that reason, he is not really part of the ‘in crowd’ of owners in Chianti Classico’s highly political ecosystem. But he doesn’t need to be, the wines speak for themselves. These wines are simply extraordinary. The only wines that fall a bit short are the 2015s, but rain during harvest is not exactly easy to work around. De Marchi’s Chianti Classico Gran Selezione is one of just a few wines that truly express what the top of the qualitative hierarchy is, while his wines from international varieties, now out of favor, remain compelling. The flagship remains the 100% Sangiovese Cepparello, which in its best vintages, is capable of developing beautifully in bottle for 25+ years.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (02/19)

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  • Isole e Olena Syrah 2019

    £61.95

    “The 2019 Syrah Collezione Privata is quite delicate and silky in this vintage, with a distinctly red-fruited profile that is unusual. Spice, orange peel, dried flowers and white pepper lend brightness to a Syrah that is both deep and light on its feet. I especially admire the vibrancy here. Drinking window: 2024-2034. 95 points

    Paolo De Marchi’s decision to sell Isole e Olena was on every producer’s mind when I visited Chianti Classico recently. Never one to hold back his opinions, De Marchi quickly established himself as a leader in the appellation with a series of stunning wines and a relentless drive to build the reputation of his estate. I can still remember the first time I tasted the flagship Cepparello. I was probably in my mid-twenties, and yet the wine was so distinctive I have never forgotten it. While focus has always been on Sangiovese, De Marchi is one of the few producers in Tuscany who has also excelled with Chardonnay, Syrah and Cabernet Sauvignon, as I have personally seen in tasting many older vintages here over the years. To say that Paolo De Marchi will be missed is a massive understatement, but words aren’t really adequate to express all he has achieved and contribute in a long, storied career that goes back to the mid-1970s.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (07/22)

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  • Le Pergole Torte and Montevertine Mixed Six

    £875.00

    This selection contains the following:

    Two bottles of Montevertine Le Pergole Torte 2018

    “The 2018 Le Pergole Torte is dense, creamy and nuanced from the very first taste. Red/purplish berry fruit, spice, rose petal and a touch of new French oak all build as the Pergole Torte opens with aeration. As always, Pergole shows that extra touch of richness from the selection of fruit used here, with that added texture from French oak. As appealing as the 2018 is today, it is of course a very young wine that will need years to be at its very finest. Drinking window: 2028-2048. 96 points

    Martino Manetti describes 2018 as a year that was not overly hot. Harvest took place from October 5-19. The key event in 2018 was a whopping 100mm of rain that fell in August, which shaped wines that are on the understated side, even by the house’s historical standards. Manetti adds that 2019 was warmer than 2018 at Montevertine, showing how general trends with these two vintages don’t always apply. As always, the wines are made in a pretty straightforward style. Primary and secondary fermentation are done in cement. Montevertine spends two years in cask, while Le Pergole Torte sees a year in French oak followed by a year in cask. These remain some of the most singular wines readers will come across in Chianti Classico, or anywhere, for that matter.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (09/21)

    Two bottles of Montevertine 2018

    “The 2018 Montevertine is fabulous. Bright and translucent in the glass, the 2018 is elegant and light on its feet like few, if any, vintages I can remember. Rose petal, mint, lavender and bright red/purplish berry fruit linger. The 2018 is one of the most refined, understated Montevertines ever. Silky, elegant and gracious, the 2018 is an absolute winner. Drinking window: 2026-2043. 95 points”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (09/21)

    One bottle of Montevertine Le Pergole Torte 2019

    “The 2019 Le Pergole Torte is all class and refinement. At the same time, the 2019 is quite reticent at this stage. In this tasting, the Pergole Torte comes across as more refined and aromatically expressive than the Montevertine, with lovely brightness driving the red berry fruit. Elegant and sophisticated, the 2019 is a wine to treasure for the next several decades. Time in the glass brings out the floral upper register and red Sangiovese fruit of Pergole Torte. Drinking window: 2029-2049. 97 points

    “Martino Manetti’s 2019s and 2020s are magnificent. The Montevertine, which has long lived in the shadows of Le Pergole Torte, is quite impressive in both vintages. Because Montevertine is aged exclusively in cask (while Pergole Torte sees a year of barrel and a year in cask), it exudes a feeling of classicism that is especially distinctive. In 2020, Montevertine includes a new parcel on the other side of Radda that seems to add greater richness and weight. Manetti describes 2019 as a year with a regular summer and no excesses. Harvest started on October 5 and lasted 15 days, while picking began about a week earlier in 2020. In tasting, the 2020s show more density and opulence than the 2019s, but both vintages are strong across the board.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (07/22)

    One bottle of Montevertine 2019

    “The 2019 Montevertine is absolutely gorgeous. Plush and silky, with terrific depth, the 2019 impresses with its exceptional balance. In most years, the tannins can be a bit fierce, but in 2019 they are surprisingly soft and caressing in relative terms. Once again, I am quite struck by the sheer richness in the 2019. Black cherry, plum, lavender, spice, tobacco and incense build in this decidedly potent Montevertine. This is an especially fine edition and a very serious wine. Impressive. In 2019, Montevertine will give Pergole Torte a run for its money. Drinking window: 2027-2044. 96 points”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (07/22)

    In Stock

  • Montenidoli Canaiuolo Rosato 2022

    £21.95

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Montevertine Pian del Ciampolo 2021

    £48.95

    “The 2021 Pian del Ciampolo is silky, elegant and gracious, all of which make it a fine choice for drinking now and over the next 10-15 years. Despite the warm vintage, the 2021 captures the finesse and elegance of Radda in spades. Time in the glass brings out the wine’s natural richness. The 2021 will be very appealing to drink early, but it has the stuffing to age. Drinking window: 2026-2036. 92 points

    Martino Manetti excelled in both 2020 and 2021. The 2020s are shaping up to be modern-day classics. They offer a stunning mix of precision and power, tempered by a more moderate growing season. The 2021s are a bit richer but also show tremendous harmony. I tasted all the 2021s from cask after a first blending of all the lots.

    As has been the case for a number of years, I continue to be impressed by the Montevertine, a wine that sometimes gets less attention than the flagship Pergole Torte. This is the first year that benefits from the inclusion of a new vineyard at the other end of town that was previously leased by Istine. Not much has changed here in terms of winemaking. Alcoholic fermentation takes place in cement, using indigenous yeasts. Malolactic fermentation follows, also in cement. The wines are racked off their lees and racked into oak in the early part of the following year. Montevertine spends two years in cask, whereas Pergole Torte sees a year in French oak barrique followed by a year in cask.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (08/23)

    The first significant date in the history of this estate is 1967, when Martino’s father Sergio (a Milanese whose family had made money in steel) bought the Montevertine estate as a holiday home. At that time, estate was perhaps something of a misnomer, since Signor Manetti’s purchase basically consisted of a ramshackle farmhouse and sixty acres or so of neglected farmland. However, there was one other hidden asset in the form of Bruno Bini, who lived on the estate and who became, in those early days, the owner’s right hand man and cellarmaster. In 1968, about an acre with north/northeastern exposure was planted to Sangiovese. In 1971, the first vintage from this estate was shown at Vinitaly to much acclaim and the first vintage of Le Pergole Torte followed in 1977.

    In those distant days, Le Pergole Torte was not 100% Sangiovese – in fact, it did not become so until the 1990 vintage. However, Signor Manetti was a devoted protagonist of Sangiovese and its unique power to express the qualities of its native terroir. This was not, of course, the prevailing wisdom: in fact, regulations forbade the making of 100% Sangiovese wines. Instead, they had to be blended with white grape varieties such as Trebbiano. These strictures led directly to the development of the so-called Supertuscans but Le Pergole Torte is a Super-Sangiovese rather than a Supertuscan. The trajectory of this estate had always been towards making an ever better and purer Sangiovese and one which would best express the individual attributes of Radda, which, at 425 metres above sea level, is one of the highest altitude spots in the Chianti Classico appellation.

    Sergio’s philosophy of pure Sangiovese always put at him at odds with the regulatory authorities. In 1981, he stopped producing Chianti Classico and left the DOC. Even when the regulations changed in 1995 and the use of white grape varieties in Chianti was finally banned, he and his wines remained steadfastly outside the DOC. In the early days, Sergio was also helped by Giulio Gambelli, who became his consultant from 1971. Signor Gambelli was one of the main exponents of Sangiovese as a mono-varietal at a time when the rules required blending with white grape varieties. He was also a master taster rather than an oenologist, known in his lifetime as “il grande maestro di Sangiovese” or, more affectionately, as “Il Bicchierino” (Little Glass). Signor Gambelli passed away in January 2012, so the 2011 vintage was his last. Today, the total estate comprises roughly fifty acres, divided into nine parcels. There are three wines: Pian del Ciampolo, Montevertine and Le Pergole Torte.

    In Stock

  • Poggio Scalette Capogatto 2020

    £49.95

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Poggio Scalette Il Carbonaione 2020

    £49.95

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Poggio Scalette Piantonaia 2020

    £99.95

    The 2020 Piantonaia, 100% Merlot, is a wild, exotic wine. Super-ripe red cherry fruit, hard candy, mocha and sweet floral notes add to an impression of flamboyance that is impossible to miss. Time in bottle might help the elements come together a bit more fully. I imagine the Piantonaia will remain a pretty extroverted, flashy wine. Drinking window: 2024-2032. 89 points”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (08/23)

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  • Rocca di Montegrossi Geremia 2018

    £44.95

    “The 2018 Geremia is stellar. A wine of energy and delineation, Geremia is all about persistence more than volume in 2018. Blueberry, blackberry, lavender, licorice and scorched earth abound. In 2018, Geremia is a wine at tension and reserve. It’s best days are far off in the future. I wouldn’t dream of touching a bottle anytime soon. Drinking window: 2026-2038. 96 points

    Marco Ricasoli-Firidolfi turned out another spectacular set of wines. His 2020 Chianti Classico shows how promising the vintage is, while the 2017 Chianti Classico Gran Selezione Vigneto San Marcellino and 2018 Geremia are terrific editions of both wines. As always, the house style deftly marries Gaiole fruit intensity with structure. The wines are so appealing on release (partly because the top selections see a few years in bottle first), but they really blossom with cellaring.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (07/22)

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  • Sancaba Pinot Nero 2017

    £53.49

    Review to follow

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  • Tenuta di Biserno Il Pino di Biserno 2019

    £46.75

    “The 2019 ll Pino di Biserno is gracious and elegant. The style is much fresher and understated than before. Silky tannins wrap around a core of dark fruit, mocha, spice, licorice and incense. Dark and vibrant in the glass, the 2019 is another winner from Lodovico Antinori. Drinking window: 2022-2031. 92 points

    Lodovico Antinori’s new releases are terrific. They show a move towards a slightly more understated style than in the past, as is common at many properties in Maremma. The wines are still quite opulent and generous, but without the heaviness that marked some previous releases. I find the wines compelling and delicious.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (07/22)

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  • Tenuta di Biserno Il Pino di Biserno 2021

    £48.25

    “The Tenuta di Biserno 2021 Il Pino di Biserno is a blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Petit Verdot and Cabernet Franc. The Cabernet-adjacent aromas come through nicely with dark fruit, blackberry and exotic spice. The wine is full-bodied in texture and structure, although it manages slightly more contained richness on the mid-palate. That gives Il Pino a more accessible disposition. It closes with a bright note of sweet cherry.Drink: 2022-2031. 94 points”

    Monica Larner, Wine Advocate (05/23)

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