Umbria


Showing all 8 results

  • Paolo Bea Montefalco Riserva Pipparello 2015

    £79.95

    “Leave it to Bea to create a perfectly poised, structured and classic wine in such a warm vintage. The 2015 Pipparello Montefalco Rosso Riserva takes time to blossom in the glass, showing little more than dusty roses, hints of white smoke and cranberry at first. However, with coaxing, it grows in richness and volume, displaying crushed black cherry giving way to clove, lavender, sage, mint leaf and air-dried meats. All the while, there’s a fresh and feminine character, following through to the silky, almost creamy textures, which never feel weighty or cloying. Ripe red fruits and inner florals cascade across a core of spice and minerals as a layer of fine tannin begins to penetrate deeply, drying the senses and creating a sour twang. The palate aches under the Pipparello’s massive structure, and notes of tart citrus and concentrated wild berry fruit linger long. It’s going to take some time for the 2015 to mature into a more pleasurable expression, but it will be worth the wait. This is composed of 60% Sangiovese, 25% Montepulciano and 15% Sagrantino, all matured in large neutral barrels and released significantly later than most other producers’ wines. Drinking window: 2024-2034. 94 points

    Giampiero and Giuseppe Bea continue to work their five hectares of vineyards by hand, choosing to use only one-third of their 15-hectare property for grape production even though they could easily continue planting to expand. Their vineyards occupy the higher elevations of Montefalco terroir, reaching up to 500 meters above sea level. The Beas don’t label themselves organic or biodynamic; they simply farm the way their family did long before herbicides and pesticides were developed, depending on biodiversity and Mother Nature’s fertilizers to deliver a transparent representation of each vintage. In the winery, gentle macerations and slow fermentations can last from three weeks to as many as seven before the wine is placed into steel tanks for a year to rest. For the bigger reds, this is followed by refinement in large Slavonian oak for up to three years. At this point, the wines are bottled without filtration and little, if any, added sulfur, and then left to rest for another year or more. Giampiero Bea will tell you that he sells his wines when they are “ready,” but when dealing with a grape as naturally high in tannin as Sagrantino, you have to take that with a grain of salt. The most recent releases include the long-awaited 2015 Riserva Pipparello, a wine that is typically released before the Sagrantino Pagliaro (which came out in early 2020) but was held back until now. This blend of Sangiovese, Montepulciano and Sagrantino has become a perennial favorite of mine. It’s typically a wine of power yet also grace, with the potential to mature for well over a decade, and the 2015 is no different. Another recent release is the 2012 Sagrantino Cerrete, which hails from poor mineral-rich soils in the highest elevation-vineyard planted to Sagrantino in Montefalco, at up to 500 meters. This is a wine that trades power for grace yet will last for ages. It will also take many years to come fully into form. But that’s okay, because you can always occupy yourself with the more lightly structured, young-vines Sagrantinos, the 2015 Rosso de Veo or the 2015 San Valentino, which is a sexy blend of Sangiovese, Montepulciano and Sagrantino intended for early consumption. Keep in mind with the wines of Paolo Bea that there is the risk of bottle variation and volatile acidity, which I’ve encountered on more than one occasion. For me, each great experience with these wines outweighs the letdowns.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (08/21)

    In Stock

  • Paolo Bea Rosso de Veo 2011

    £74.99

    Four bottles available

    “How is Paolo Bea one of the few iconic producers in Italy to remain under the radar? It’s a combination of low quantity, releasing late, lack of desire to market themselves, and an unwillingness to submit wines for review to the press. Luckily, I’ve been collecting them for many years and was happy to pull well-stored vintages from my cellar for review.

    The history of the Bea family is closely tied to Montefalco, going back as far as the 16th century. There is no winemaking wizardry and no chemicals in the vineyard or winery. Instead, it’s complete respect for what each vintage brings to the table, and the Bea family’s desire to bottle that expression, capturing the essence of terroir, without taking anything away. The current generation, represented by Giampiero and Giuseppe, continues to work their five hectares of vineyards by hand, choosing to use only one-third of their 15-hectare property for the production of grapes, even though they could easily continue planting to expand. Their vineyards occupy the higher elevations of Montefalco terroir, reaching up to 1,500 feet above sea level, and taking advantage of a diverse mix of soils. It’s here that they have begun to vineyard-designate their lineup of Sagrantino. In the winery, gentle macerations and slow fermentations can last from three weeks to as many as seven before the wine is placed into steel tanks for a year to rest, and then large neutral wood for up to two years. At this point, the wines are bottled without filtration and extremely low, if any, added sulfur, and left to rest for another year. This process is a long, painstaking effort that is extremely costly to the producer, but the Bea family insists on releasing wines that they deem ready to drink.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (06/20)

    In Stock

  • Paolo Bea Rosso de Veo 2015

    £84.95

    “The 2015 Rosso de Veo is monstrously intense yet wonderfully balanced, showing masses of crushed black cherry, balsamic spice, stone dust and wild, exotic florals on the nose. Velvety textures give way to ripe red and blue berries with a spicy-citrus twang, backed by stimulating acids, as saline-minerality saturates under a coating of liquid violets. This finishes long, staining the palate with fruit concentrate and grippy tannins, yet considering how structured this is, there’s a balance here that provides plenty of pleasure already. This is simply gorgeous and has a very bright future ahead of it. Drinking window: 2022-2032. 93 points

    Giampiero and Giuseppe Bea continue to work their five hectares of vineyards by hand, choosing to use only one-third of their 15-hectare property for grape production even though they could easily continue planting to expand. Their vineyards occupy the higher elevations of Montefalco terroir, reaching up to 500 meters above sea level. The Beas don’t label themselves organic or biodynamic; they simply farm the way their family did long before herbicides and pesticides were developed, depending on biodiversity and Mother Nature’s fertilizers to deliver a transparent representation of each vintage. In the winery, gentle macerations and slow fermentations can last from three weeks to as many as seven before the wine is placed into steel tanks for a year to rest. For the bigger reds, this is followed by refinement in large Slavonian oak for up to three years. At this point, the wines are bottled without filtration and little, if any, added sulfur, and then left to rest for another year or more. Giampiero Bea will tell you that he sells his wines when they are “ready,” but when dealing with a grape as naturally high in tannin as Sagrantino, you have to take that with a grain of salt. The most recent releases include the long-awaited 2015 Riserva Pipparello, a wine that is typically released before the Sagrantino Pagliaro (which came out in early 2020) but was held back until now. This blend of Sangiovese, Montepulciano and Sagrantino has become a perennial favorite of mine. It’s typically a wine of power yet also grace, with the potential to mature for well over a decade, and the 2015 is no different. Another recent release is the 2012 Sagrantino Cerrete, which hails from poor mineral-rich soils in the highest elevation-vineyard planted to Sagrantino in Montefalco, at up to 500 meters. This is a wine that trades power for grace yet will last for ages. It will also take many years to come fully into form. But that’s okay, because you can always occupy yourself with the more lightly structured, young-vines Sagrantinos, the 2015 Rosso de Veo or the 2015 San Valentino, which is a sexy blend of Sangiovese, Montepulciano and Sagrantino intended for early consumption. Keep in mind with the wines of Paolo Bea that there is the risk of bottle variation and volatile acidity, which I’ve encountered on more than one occasion. For me, each great experience with these wines outweighs the letdowns.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (08/21)

    In Stock

  • Paolo Bea Sagrantino di Montefalco Pagliaro 2015

    £109.95

    “How is Paolo Bea one of the few iconic producers in Italy to remain under the radar? It’s a combination of low quantity, releasing late, lack of desire to market themselves, and an unwillingness to submit wines for review to the press. Luckily, I’ve been collecting them for many years and was happy to pull well-stored vintages from my cellar for review.

    The history of the Bea family is closely tied to Montefalco, going back as far as the 16th century. There is no winemaking wizardry and no chemicals in the vineyard or winery. Instead, it’s complete respect for what each vintage brings to the table, and the Bea family’s desire to bottle that expression, capturing the essence of terroir, without taking anything away. The current generation, represented by Giampiero and Giuseppe, continues to work their five hectares of vineyards by hand, choosing to use only one-third of their 15-hectare property for the production of grapes, even though they could easily continue planting to expand. Their vineyards occupy the higher elevations of Montefalco terroir, reaching up to 1,500 feet above sea level, and taking advantage of a diverse mix of soils. It’s here that they have begun to vineyard-designate their lineup of Sagrantino. In the winery, gentle macerations and slow fermentations can last from three weeks to as many as seven before the wine is placed into steel tanks for a year to rest, and then large neutral wood for up to two years. At this point, the wines are bottled without filtration and extremely low, if any, added sulfur, and left to rest for another year. This process is a long, painstaking effort that is extremely costly to the producer, but the Bea family insists on releasing wines that they deem ready to drink.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (06/20)

    In Stock

  • Tabarrini Montefalco Sagrantino Campo alla Cerqua 2013

    £51.95

    “One of three single-vineyard wines, the 2013 Montefalco Sagrantino Campo Alla Cerqua sees fruit sourced from a plot with rocky soils and southeastern exposures. The bouquet is more developed and focused as a result, with clear mineral imprinting behind plump red fruit and exotic spice. This wine is also aged in large oak casks like the others, but it offers a very precise and clean collection of fruit aromas. Drink: 2017-2028. 92 points

    This is an inspired set of new releases from Giampaolo Tabarrini. The winery is undergoing an ambitious enlargement plan that should increase bottle production up from the 70,000 units currently produced each year.”

    Monica Larner, Wine Advocate (234)

    In Stock

  • Tabarrini Montefalco Sagrantino Colle alle Macchie 2016

    £54.95

    “Rich plum and cherry sauce mixes with hints of ginger, sweet spice and dusty rose as the 2016 Montetalco Sagrantino Colle alle Macchie blossoms in the glass. There’s an energy here that captures the attention; this is silky in feel yet also surprisingly juicy and spry, with tart cherries giving way to complementary notes of clove and cinnamon. Of course, this is a young Sagrantino, and as such, its grippy tannins take control through the finale, but there’s plenty of residual acids and zesty citrus to keep the expression quite interesting. That said, the best is truly yet to come. The Colle alle Macchie is produced from vines growing in clay rich soils and refined for 36 months in French oak, hence the balance of sweet spice, power and structure. Drinking window: 2025-2036. 94 points

    Giampaolo Tabarrini took the reins of the Tabarrini family holdings in the late 1990s. The winery is located just outside of Montefalco and includes 11 hectares of vines, primarily Sagrantino, Sangiovese and Trebbiano Spoletino. What really sets this estate apart is the importance that Giampaolo Tabarrini places on terroir, focusing on distinct parcels within their holdings that create unique expressions. Their estate Sagrantino blends fruit from throughout their vineyards, yet it’s in their cru bottlings Grimaldesco (southeast-facing, silty-limestone-clay soils at 350 meters), Campo alla Cerqua (south-facing, looser clay, mineral soil full of river stones at 365 meters) and Colle alle Macchie (south-facing, deep, thick clay and limestone soils at 380 meters) that you see just how sensitive to site the variety really is. These are big, strapping wines, but their balance is remarkable, making them a sure bet for extended cellaring. Also of serious note is the Adarmando, a varietal Trebbiano Spoletino that matches intense fruit and power without sacrificing elegance. Tasting the new 2019 against the mature 2010 made me a believer in this cuvée’s ability to mature.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (08/21)

    In Stock

  • Tabarrini Montefalco Sagrantino Colle Grimaldesco 2016

    £46.95

    “Wild herbs, hints of animal musk and crushed ashen stone give way to a core of citrus-tinged blackberry as the 2016 Montefalco Sagrantino Colle Grimaldesco slowly comes to life in the glass. The textures are elegant and silky, yet quickly firm up as notes of tart cherry, black tea and savory herbs join with brisk acidity, forming tension toward the close. Fine tannins dominate through the long, chiseled finale, complicated by sour wild berries and a hint of spicy citrus. While a bit painful today, all the 2016 needs is time to soften and unwind, at which point it will be a stunner. Drinking window: 2025-2036. 93 points

    Giampaolo Tabarrini took the reins of the Tabarrini family holdings in the late 1990s. The winery is located just outside of Montefalco and includes 11 hectares of vines, primarily Sagrantino, Sangiovese and Trebbiano Spoletino. What really sets this estate apart is the importance that Giampaolo Tabarrini places on terroir, focusing on distinct parcels within their holdings that create unique expressions. Their estate Sagrantino blends fruit from throughout their vineyards, yet it’s in their cru bottlings Grimaldesco (southeast-facing, silty-limestone-clay soils at 350 meters), Campo alla Cerqua (south-facing, looser clay, mineral soil full of river stones at 365 meters) and Colle alle Macchie (south-facing, deep, thick clay and limestone soils at 380 meters) that you see just how sensitive to site the variety really is. These are big, strapping wines, but their balance is remarkable, making them a sure bet for extended cellaring. Also of serious note is the Adarmando, a varietal Trebbiano Spoletino that matches intense fruit and power without sacrificing elegance. Tasting the new 2019 against the mature 2010 made me a believer in this cuvée’s ability to mature.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (08/21)

    In Stock

  • Castello della Sala Cervaro della Sala 2019

    £61.95

    Review to follow

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