Veneto


Showing 1–12 of 16 results

  • Allegrini Amarone della Valpolicella Classico 2019

    £65.49

    “One of the things I have always enjoyed about the Allegrini portfolio is how focused the family is on the importance of place. Last year, the La Grola hill provided terrific insights into the importance of terroir. La Grola is the source of Allegrini’s namesake wine and the varietal Corvina Veronese, La Poja. This year, the high-elevation (411 meters), Fieramonte vineyard really shined with the release of the 2015 Riserva. While the Amarone Classico remains a benchmark of the region, the Fieramonte takes things to a deeper and more savory place. Its aromatics alone are enough to keep the taster fascinated for quite some time. The 2015 is one of the best wines I’ve ever tasted from this estate. My hat is off to Marilisa Allegrini.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (03/23)

    In Stock

  • Bertani Amarone della Valpolicella Classico 2012

    £109.95

    “The 2012 Amarone della Valpolicella Classico takes its time opening in the glass, slowly evolving with a rich blend of crushed black cherries complemented by dusty violet florals and exotic spice. This coasts across the palate, silky-smooth yet with cooling minerality and brisk acids that add an energetic feel as a saturation of red fruits and fine tannins collect toward the close. The 2012 finishes lightly structured with a resonance of balsamic spice and bitter hints of cocoa that linger on and on—a fantastic and genuinely harmonious rendition of Bertani’s Amarone Classico. Drinking window: 2024-2040. 93 points”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (03/23)

    In Stock

  • Casa Coste Piane Valdobbiadene Prosecco N.V.

    £21.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Dal Forno Romano Amarone della Valpolicella Monte Lodoletta 2013

    £279.95

    “The 2014 is a unique rendition of Dal Forno’s Valpolicella Superiore Monte Lodoletta. It’s a remarkably pretty wine, displaying crushed ripe strawberries and plums with cinnamon, clove, vanilla bean and a cooling hint of mint. The textures are velvety, coating all that they touch in glycerol fruit concentration, yet somehow coming across as zesty and spry, contrasting weight with saturating notes of tart blackberry and savory spice. There’s a bit at a lull in the midpalate, yet it hardly takes away from the experience. At times, the Monte Lodoletta can seem almost salty, especially through its long, mouthwatering finish, where hints of cherry pits and herbs linger. This atypical yet truly enjoyable expression is the result of the extremely difficult 2014 vintage, when hail damaged and reduced the crop in the lower-elevation vineyards, followed by rain from August through September. As a result, Dal Forno decided not to produce their Amarone, and to instead focus all of their attention on the Valpolicella. The result is a wine that no Dal Forno fan should miss, but be aware that production was down 30% from an average year. Drinking window: 2024-2040. 97 points

    The Val d’Illasi is the furthest valley east of Verona that is permitted to produce Valpolicella and Amarone. It is not part of the original “Classico” growing area, but it is the home of the Dal Forno vineyards and winery. With 26 hectares of vines planted at an average of 270 meters, the Dal Forno family is able to blend the advantages of the alluvial soils in the lower elevations, and the clay-rich soils as their vines move further upslope. The focus here is on the traditional mix of varieties: Corvina, Corvinone, Rondinella, Oseleta and Croatina. However, in the winery, Dal Forno depends on a modern approach, with no fear of technology, to create their portfolio of dark, massively intense, seamlessly elegant, yet wonderfully balanced Amarone and Valpolicella. Marco Dal Forno, enologist and second generation, explained that the family had recently acquired another 24 hectares of vineyards, but it intends to experiment with them prior to blending them into the production. His goal is to better understand the unique soil types within Illasi and how each variety acts differently within them, in order to plan for replantings in the future. That said, production quantity was a repeating theme of our conversations, as he also explained to me that hail is becoming more and more frequent. As I mentioned previously, these are modern interpretations of the wines of the region, but don’t let that deter you, because they are also some of the best produced from year to year. Following an extremely strict selection, Corvina grapes for the Amarone undergo three months of air-drying, followed by a first fermentation in stainless steel with automated punch-downs; and then moved into new French oak, where the wine undergoes a slow secondary fermentation that can last up to 18 months. Ultimately, the Amarone spends two years in barrel prior to bottling. It’s also extremely important to take note that even the Valpolicella of Dal Forno spends 45 days air-drying, followed by two years in new oak and three years in bottle. Basically, it’s like drinking many other producers’ Amarone, but it’s labeled Valpolicella.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (02/21)

    In Stock

  • Dal Forno Romano Vigna Sere 2004 (375ml)

    £129.95

    “The 2004 Vigna Sere is the perfect conclusion to a vintage that will go down as one of Dal Forno’s most magical. Sweet, silky tannins support layers of super-refined, elegant fruit in this magical sweet red. Mocha, espresso, new leather, raspberry jam and spices emerge with time in the glass, but this is really a wine that shows off textural finesse more than anything else. I have tasted this wine many times since it was in barrel and later in bottle. It has never been anything less than spellbinding. It is one of the most magical sweet dessert wines l have ever tasted. At eight years of age the 2004 remains an infant. Drink: 2014-2024. 98 points”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (02/11)

     

    In Stock

  • Le Salette Pergole Vece Amarone della Valpolicella Classico 2017

    £108.95

    “The 2017 Amarone della Valpolicella Classico Pergole Vece wafts up with blood orange and spice giving way to blackberries, currants and sweet herbs. It’s silky and staining with blue-tinged fruits and inner florals-like liquid extract, as dark chocolate and raspberry liqueur come through. There’s so much depth here, as this seems almost salty in character. It’s incredibly long with a sweet flourish and unexpectedly fresh. The 2017 is so incredibly easy to like. Drinking window: 2022-2030. 92 points”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (04/22)

    In Stock

  • Marion Amarone della Valpolicella 2018

    £74.95

    “The 2018 Amarone della Valpolicella is smoky and darkly alluring, with masses of crushed stone and savory herbs giving way to dried black cherry. This is an especially lifted and juicy red from Marion. Depths of tart wild berry fruit and spiced citrus tones excited by vibrant acidity. It finishes potent and lightly structured, nearly buzzing with residual tension, as hints of hard red candy and dark, dark chocolate linger for what seems to be a full minute. Drinking window: 2024-2032. 94 points

    The Marion winery and vineyards are located in Marcellise, outside the Classico zone, on the hills east of Verona. This year’s releases include a new set of wines that Stefano Campedelli made from a vineyard across the valley from the winery with distinctly white calcareous soils. The wines are labeled Corte Lavel, and are done in a more immediate style. That said, the Amarone is impressive, with years of positive development in store for collectors. At Marion, the 2018 Teroldego is a highlight. Many 2018s in Valpolicella come across as fragile and almost diluted in feel, yet that is not the case here. The 2018 Amarone is also notable, yet more in the context of the vintage.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (03/23)

    In Stock

  • Marion Valpolicella Superiore 2018

    £38.95

    “The 2018 Valpolicella Superiore is beautiful. Peppery florals and earth tones give way to wild strawberries and licorice. It splashes across the palate with a balanced inner sweetness contrasted by a mix of red plums and saline-mineral tones. The 2018 leaves the mouth watering for more, finishing only lightly structured and potent with lingering tart wild berries and sour citrus hints. Drinking window: 2023-2028. 92 points

    The Marion winery and vineyards are located in Marcellise, outside the Classico zone, on the hills east of Verona. This year’s releases include a new set of wines that Stefano Campedelli made from a vineyard across the valley from the winery with distinctly white calcareous soils. The wines are labeled Corte Lavel, and are done in a more immediate style. That said, the Amarone is impressive, with years of positive development in store for collectors. At Marion, the 2018 Teroldego is a highlight. Many 2018s in Valpolicella come across as fragile and almost diluted in feel, yet that is not the case here. The 2018 Amarone is also notable, yet more in the context of the vintage.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (03/23)

    In Stock

  • Monte Dall’Ora Amarone della Valpolicella Stropa 2013

    £89.95

    “The darkly alluring 2013 Amarone della Valpolicella Classico Stropa smolders up from the glass with a beguiling mix of ground ginger, crushed ashen stone, sugar-dusted black cherries and cloves. This floods the palate with an intense wave of ripe medicinal cherry and blackberry, accentuated by a pretty inner sweetness yet contrasted by a pop of brisk acidity that adds tension toward the close. The 2013 finishes dramatically long and primary with youthfully grippy tannins and a potent staining of residual fruits. Cedar and licorice hints slowly fade. So powerful but also energetic, the 2013 has outstanding cellaring potential. Drinking window: 2026-2040. 95+ points

    Over the last few years, I’ve been happily following the wines of Monte dall’Ora, which possess a sense of energy and purity seldom found in Valpolicella. Carlo Venturini and his wife Alessandra Zantedeschi started to work their farm in 1995, organic at first, with a conversion to biodynamic principles in 2006. The couple believes deeply in biodiversity, using pergola-trained vines planted amongst cherry and olive trees and grasses and wildflowers that create a natural ecosystem. The family also tends to a 50-year-old parcel planted using the “vite maritata” system, where the vines are “married” or supported by trees, including almond and mulberry. This parcel creates their Amarone Stropa, which is a huge standout. Each wine is a declaration of place with vineyards throughout the Classico zone. Also of note is the high-elevation San Giorgio vineyard, which produces one of the most exciting Valpolicella I have tasted this year. This is low intervention, natural winemaking at its very best.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (03/23)

    In Stock

  • Monte Dall’Ora Valpolicella Superiore Camporenzo 2020

    £26.95

    “Over the last few years, I’ve been happily following the wines of Monte dall’Ora, which possess a sense of energy and purity seldom found in Valpolicella. Carlo Venturini and his wife Alessandra Zantedeschi started to work their farm in 1995, organic at first, with a conversion to biodynamic principles in 2006. The couple believes deeply in biodiversity, using pergola-trained vines planted amongst cherry and olive trees and grasses and wildflowers that create a natural ecosystem. The family also tends to a 50-year-old parcel planted using the “vite maritata” system, where the vines are “married” or supported by trees, including almond and mulberry. This parcel creates their Amarone Stropa, which is a huge standout. Each wine is a declaration of place with vineyards throughout the Classico zone. Also of note is the high-elevation San Giorgio vineyard, which produces one of the most exciting Valpolicella I have tasted this year. This is low intervention, natural winemaking at its very best.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (03/23)

    In Stock

  • Monte Dall’Ora Valpolicella Superiore Ripasso Sausto 2019

    £33.25

    “The 2019 Valpolicella Superiore Ripasso Sausto takes its time opening in the glass but is worth the wait, as hints of chalk dust and cedar give way to exotic spice and pepper-tinged tart cherry. This splashes across the palate, juicy, almost playful at first, yet with a core of intense wild berry fruits and minerals that slowly saturate. It finishes structured and long, still in a primary stage yet bursting at the seams, leaving black raspberry and clove to resonate through the slightly chewy finale. The 2019 Sausto will need some time to blossom fully but is packed full of potential. Drinking window: 2024-2036. 93 points

    Over the last few years, I’ve been happily following the wines of Monte dall’Ora, which possess a sense of energy and purity seldom found in Valpolicella. Carlo Venturini and his wife Alessandra Zantedeschi started to work their farm in 1995, organic at first, with a conversion to biodynamic principles in 2006. The couple believes deeply in biodiversity, using pergola-trained vines planted amongst cherry and olive trees and grasses and wildflowers that create a natural ecosystem. The family also tends to a 50-year-old parcel planted using the “vite maritata” system, where the vines are “married” or supported by trees, including almond and mulberry. This parcel creates their Amarone Stropa, which is a huge standout. Each wine is a declaration of place with vineyards throughout the Classico zone. Also of note is the high-elevation San Giorgio vineyard, which produces one of the most exciting Valpolicella I have tasted this year. This is low intervention, natural winemaking at its very best.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (03/23)

    In Stock

  • Monte Dall’Ora Valpolicella Superiore San Giorgio Alto 2017

    £38.95

    “Over the last few years, I’ve been happily following the wines of Monte dall’Ora, which possess a sense of energy and purity seldom found in Valpolicella. Carlo Venturini and his wife Alessandra Zantedeschi started to work their farm in 1995, organic at first, with a conversion to biodynamic principles in 2006. The couple believes deeply in biodiversity, using pergola-trained vines planted amongst cherry and olive trees and grasses and wildflowers that create a natural ecosystem. The family also tends to a 50-year-old parcel planted using the “vite maritata” system, where the vines are “married” or supported by trees, including almond and mulberry. This parcel creates their Amarone Stropa, which is a huge standout. Each wine is a declaration of place with vineyards throughout the Classico zone. Also of note is the high-elevation San Giorgio vineyard, which produces one of the most exciting Valpolicella I have tasted this year. This is low intervention, natural winemaking at its very best.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (03/23)

    In Stock