Italy


Showing 1–12 of 15 results

  • Allegrini Amarone della Valpolicella Classico 2018

    £61.95

    “Touring the Allegrini vineyards is an eye-opening experience to say the least. It’s one thing to read and write about how owner Marilisa Allegrini has been pushing the boundaries in the region, and it’s another thing to truly see it. When I say pushing boundaries, mostly I mean the importance the Allegrini family places on terroir, a concept that Valpolicella has only recently begun to accept. Another push is their beliefs that the two most important grape varieties of the region are Corvina Veronese and Corvinone, and how the blending rules of the DOC are preventing producers from making the best wines possible. It’s because of this that Allegrini uses the maximum amount allowed of each throughout their range of Valpolicella, Amarone, and Riserva, balancing out to 45% Corvina Veronese, 45% Corvinone, 5% Rondinella and 5% Oseleta. It’s also the reason why a number of the highlights from the portfolio are labeled IGT, allowing for a more dynamic mix of varieties or mono-varietal wines, such as the single-vineyard La Grola (90% Corvina Veronese and 10% Oseleta) and La Poja, a varietal Corvina Veronese. Both wines hail from the La Grola hill between 310 to 320 meters in elevation and from vines planted in 1979, and neither of them rely on appassimento to bolster their character. Add to this repertoire the Palazzo della Torre, another single-vineyard yet younger vine expression at 240 meters that mixes Corvina, Corvinone, Rondinella and a small percentage of Sangiovese to create what is one of the best values found in the region, and you have a dynamic portfolio that runs the gamut. As is usually the case, I find myself so wrapped up in the IGTs that I forget to talk about just how special the Amarone really is; in fact, I find it to be a benchmark of the region. With each vintage, the Amarone has a balance between the glycerol textures and perception of sweetness from appassimento fruit with a core of minerality and fine tannins that makes it enjoyable near release, but also able to mature over decades. It is great to know that one of the traditional families in this region is currently at the head of the pack.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (04/22)

    In Stock

  • Casa Coste Piane Valdobbiadene Prosecco N.V.

    £21.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Le Salette Pergole Vece Amarone della Valpolicella Classico 2016

    £89.99

    “The 2016 Amarone della Valpolicella Classico Pergole Vece is especially spry and lifted, offering smoky minerals, citrus-tinged blackberries and hints of confectioner’s spice. It keeps the energy high from start to finish, as silky textures gain momentum through juicy acids, giving way to medicinal cherries, minty herbs and a hint of bitter espresso bean. The 2016 doesn’t miss a beat, with a caking of fruit concentrate creating a sensation of tension under an air of sweet inner florals. While I’m loving the vibrancy here, I expected more depth from the 2016 vintage, as well as an old-vine bottling. 80% Corvina, Corvinone, 20% Rondinella, Oseleta. Drinking window: 2021-2030. 91 points”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (02/21)

    In Stock

  • Le Salette Pergole Vece Recioto della Valpolicella 2012 (500ml)

    £39.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Marion Amarone della Valpolicella 2015

    £69.99

    “Like standing over a simmering pot of cherry sauce and holiday spices, the vivid and wickedly fresh 2015 Amarone della Valpolicella makes quite a statement. It’s fruit-forward but not over the top, impressing more with its airy mix of roses, stone dust and cocoa powder. The textures are silky, coasting ripe red fruits across a core of juicy acids, while depositing salty minerals and hints of grippy tannin toward the close. That said, this doesn’t come across as overly structured, just well-framed and amazingly gastronomic for an Amarone. This high-energy, primal, perfumed and downright sexy effort will make a lot of people very happy. I wouldn’t suggest cellaring the 2015 for too long, but there’s no shame in such stunning early appeal. Corvina, Corvinone, Rondinella. Drinking window: 2021-2029. 93 points

    Marion is located in Marcellise, on the hills east of Verona and just outside of the Soave production zone. At this address, there has always been a focus on pure ripe fruits and a more balanced style instead of leaning on the overuse of appassimento and oak to create large-scale and confectionary wines. At one time, their claim to fame was in part a collaboration with Celestino Gaspari, who had gained recognition working with Giuseppe Quintarelli, and who also went on to create Zyme. In fact, this was the selling point that caught my attention many years ago and got me tasting Marion wines. I’m glad I did, because this continues to be a winery worth watching, even if they’ve morphed slightly in style and work with a new team. The fact is that the real driving force since the very beginning, and what continues to make this winery special, are the owners, Stefano Campedelli and his wife, Nicoletta Fornasa, who are constantly experimenting with methods to bring further refinement to their portfolio. For one thing, there is a constant move toward increasing the percentage of larger, neutral-aging vessels, at this time 30-hectoliter Slavonian oak. Marion has always been known to rely mostly on a combination of tonneaux and large casks, but today, the use of tonneaux has gone down even further to around 10%, and all untoasted. What’s more, Campedelli explained to me that they are looking to reduce the amount of residual sugar in their wines, “wines that you can drink rather than fleshy big-boned wines,” proudly stating that the 2016 Valpolicella comes in at zero grams per liter. Speaking of the wines, the two vintages of Valpolicella (2015 and 2016) were both fantastic, but there is really something special about the 2016, which punches well above its price point. Also from 2016, the Amarone is one to buy and bury in the cellar. Another great showing was the Teroldego, from vines planted using cuttings from Elisabetta Foradori. The 2015 is pure elegance in a glass, and it’s really quite unique. It’s produced using partial appassimento, and it matures just as much as the house Amarone, for three years in large oak and tonneaux. In fact, the only wine from this year’s submission that didn’t find a way to impress me was the 2016 Cabernet Sauvignon, again produced using partial appassimento. It simply didn’t have the depth and structure that you’d expect from both the vintage and the winemaking process. It was simply too easy to like. Overall, though, Marion continues to be at the top of their game.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (02/21)

    In Stock

  • Marion Valpolicella Superiore 2015

    £38.49

    “The 2015 Valpolicella Superiore is remarkably pretty and autumnal, wafting up with notes of cinnamon and clove that give way to crushed violets, medicinal cherry and hints of cedar. The textures are wonderfully silky, showing more savory than sweet, and full of nervous energy, as tart wild berries and minerals ride a core of juicy acidity, and inner florals form toward the close. This is quite a Valpolicella, punching well above expectations, as it finishes incredibly long and dark with hints of licorice and spice. Drinking window: 2021-2026. 91 points

    Marion is located in Marcellise, on the hills east of Verona and just outside of the Soave production zone. At this address, there has always been a focus on pure ripe fruits and a more balanced style instead of leaning on the overuse of appassimento and oak to create large-scale and confectionary wines. At one time, their claim to fame was in part a collaboration with Celestino Gaspari, who had gained recognition working with Giuseppe Quintarelli, and who also went on to create Zyme. In fact, this was the selling point that caught my attention many years ago and got me tasting Marion wines. I’m glad I did, because this continues to be a winery worth watching, even if they’ve morphed slightly in style and work with a new team. The fact is that the real driving force since the very beginning, and what continues to make this winery special, are the owners, Stefano Campedelli and his wife, Nicoletta Fornasa, who are constantly experimenting with methods to bring further refinement to their portfolio. For one thing, there is a constant move toward increasing the percentage of larger, neutral-aging vessels, at this time 30-hectoliter Slavonian oak. Marion has always been known to rely mostly on a combination of tonneaux and large casks, but today, the use of tonneaux has gone down even further to around 10%, and all untoasted. What’s more, Campedelli explained to me that they are looking to reduce the amount of residual sugar in their wines, “wines that you can drink rather than fleshy big-boned wines,” proudly stating that the 2016 Valpolicella comes in at zero grams per liter. Speaking of the wines, the two vintages of Valpolicella (2015 and 2016) were both fantastic, but there is really something special about the 2016, which punches well above its price point. Also from 2016, the Amarone is one to buy and bury in the cellar. Another great showing was the Teroldego, from vines planted using cuttings from Elisabetta Foradori. The 2015 is pure elegance in a glass, and it’s really quite unique. It’s produced using partial appassimento, and it matures just as much as the house Amarone, for three years in large oak and tonneaux. In fact, the only wine from this year’s submission that didn’t find a way to impress me was the 2016 Cabernet Sauvignon, again produced using partial appassimento. It simply didn’t have the depth and structure that you’d expect from both the vintage and the winemaking process. It was simply too easy to like. Overall, though, Marion continues to be at the top of their game.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (02/21)

    In Stock

  • Masi Costasera Amarone della Valpolicella Classico 2016

    £38.99

    “The 2016 Amarone Classico Costasera wafts up with rich notes of custard, cinnamon and dark chocolate before revealing its black cherry fruit. This is silky-smooth yet deep with herbal-tinged red and blue berries along with exotic inner florals. There’s a beautiful harmony here, as purple-tinged florals and autumnal spices linger incredibly long. The 2016 is only lightly structured, full of character and incredibly elegant. It’s a balanced pleasure bomb of an Amarone. Drinking window: 2022-2032. 93 points”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (04/22)

    In Stock

  • Masi Riserva di Costasera Amarone Classico 2015

    £54.99

    “The 2015 Amarone della Valpolicella Classico Riserva Costasera displays exotic brown spices, hints of fresh coffee grinds, crushed cherries and a lifting note of camphor. It’s a round and silky expression with a cooling wave of ripe purple-tinged fruits. Vibrant acidity maintains energy, as this comes across as elegant and harmonious. Dark chocolate, raspberries, licorice and pretty inner florals linger on and on and on. The 2015 is remarkably pretty and should excel through medium-term cellaring. 70% Corvina, 15% Rondinella, 10% Oseleta, 5% Molinara. Drinking window: 2022-2034. 93 points

    Masi acquired the Serego Alighieri estate and vineyards in 1973. This is also, arguably, the most historic estate in the Valpolicella, with a history that goes back over 650 years, which is when the son of Dante Alighieri (the poet) purchased the property. While wine was always part of the family traditions, their vast holdings also included a large amount of agriculture, including cherry trees. It was these same cherry trees that would go on to form one of the signatures of Serego Alighieri Amarone, that being the period of aging which takes place in cherry wood casks – a practice that continues to this day. In fact, it was explained to me by Raffaele Boscaini, general manager of Masi Technical Group and seventh-generation family member, that when the original purchase took place, it was suggested that the Serego Alighieri family do away with the cherry wood casks, but they refused. This may have been fate, because to this day, the Amarone of Serego Alighieri is a standout within the Masi Portfolio. Another trademark of the estate is the reliance on botrytis (noble rot) in most vintages of Serego Alighieri, which adds to the wines’ glycerol-like textures and a perception of sweetness, in spite of their average residual sugar leveling out between four and six grams per liter. These are Amarone that perform beautifully upon release, but they also age at a glacial pace. This fact was proven to me by a mini-vertical of late-release, reconditioned bottles that spanned 1988 to 2008. Only one vintage out of six was even starting to decline, the 1990. It’s important to note that while Serego Alighieri remains under the umbrella of the Masi Technical Group, it operates as its own entity. One recent change at the winery was the introduction of a new selected yeast in 2012, which was developed from three separate ambient yeasts from the estate. In the end, if you’re looking for a classic Amarone that can stand the test of time, Serego Alighieri should be on your shortlist.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (02/21)

    In Stock

  • Quintarelli Recioto della Valpolicella Classico 2004 (375ml)

    £147.95

    “Time has only been a friend to the 2004 Recioto della Valpolicella Classico. Soaring and vivid in its beauty, the 2004 is simply stunning today. Bittersweet chocolate, cloves, menthol, leather and sweet dark cherry are front and center, but it is the wine’s poise and overall nuance that truly elevate it into the stratosphere of wine elixirs. Don’t make the same mistake I have made in the past. Avoid the half bottles. The 2004 is a wine to buy in the 750s. This is as good as Recioto gets. Drinking window: 2017-2034. 98 points

    Quintarelli has essentially been a construction site for the last few years. During my most recent visit I was able to get a good look at the new facilities in a nearly finished state. I have to say the latest incarnation of the winery is stunning. The design is daring and modern – almost shockingly so – yet it also pays homage to Giuseppe Quintarelli’s legacy in a deep and touching way. As for the wines, this set of new releases will delight Quintarelli fans. Even more importantly, the estate appears to be in very good hands under the stewardship of Francesco Quintarelli, Giuseppe’s grandson.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (05/17)

    In Stock

  • Quintarelli Rosso Ca’ del Merlo 2012

    £84.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Quintarelli Valpolicella Classico Superiore 2014

    £94.95

    “This was a humid and rainy vintage and many producers in the Valpolicella decided not to make their top-shelf Amarone wines, directing their fruit to wines like this instead. The Quintarelli Giuseppe 2014 Valpolicella Classico Superiore offers a spicy opener with tarry smoke and cured tobacco. It also shows some tart and brambly fruit, and this ties into what we can expect of the vintage. In truth, the ripeness is present and balanced. It undergoes a partial and brief appassimento. The 2014 is thinner than past vintages have been, but I am very much enjoying this more streamlined and elegant approach. Drink: 2022-2032. 93+ points”

    Monica Larner, Wine Advocate (12/21)

    In Stock

  • Quintarelli Amarone della Valpolicella Classico 2012

    £299.95

    “The Quintarelli Giuseppe 2013 Amarone della Valpolicella Classico pours from its heavy glass bottle to reveal a dark ruby and shiny garnet appearance. The bouquet takes a few moments before it comes into focus, and even then, this wine holds back a bit, especially at this young stage in what promises to be a very long cellar life. It’s in no rush. The mouthfeel is especially impressive, and it brings a heightened level of texture and life to the wine. Black fruit and dried plum segue to spice, campfire ash, camphor and grilled herb. A silky and polished mouthfeel is capped by a powerful 16.5% alcohol content. This vintage will appeal to Quintarelli purists who have plenty of time to wait. Drink: 2025-2050. 96+ points

    Monica Larner, Wine Advocate (12/21)

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