Spain


Showing 1–12 of 25 results

  • Alvaro Palacios Finca Dofi 2019

    £67.49

    “The single-vineyard red 2019 Finca Dofí comes from the 14 hectares of vines planted across three parajes (lieu-dits) in Gratallops. This year, it’s 87% Garnacha, 12% Cariñena and 1% white grapes (Garnacha Blanca and Macabeo. It fermented in oak vats with indigenous yeasts and matured in large oak barrels (bocoyes and foudres) for 14 months. It’s classy, elegant and fresh with very clean aromas and flavors, not lacking concentration or power. There is superb definition and purity here; it has to be the finest and most elegant Dofí to date. It has finer tannins and more elegance than La Baixada this year. The 2018 was fragrant and this has more clout but superb balance. These two vintages have been great for Dofí. I still remember the 2005, hard as nails then and what the wine is now—spherical and velvety. Dofí on a roll… It was bottled in May 2021, and 21,146 bottles were produced. Drink: 2022-2030. 97 points

    Climate is certainly getting extreme, and in Priorat, we saw an incredibly warm (up to 43 degrees Celsius!) and dry 2019 (with only 280 liters of rain) and a 2020 with 800 liters of rain! But so much rain and the warm temperatures can only end up in a huge mildew attack. The rest of the season was extremely warm, to the point that ended it up being their earliest harvest ever! Year of extremes… year in and year out! Both years were higher in Garnacha and lower in Cariñena, in 2019 because of the heat and in 2020 because of mildew. So, the wines are more Garnacha driven than ever. For Álvaro Palacios, the highlights of the 2019 vintage (I only tasted Camins from 2020) were the Finca Dofí and L’Ermita. The Dofí was classy, elegant and fresh with very clean aromas and flavors, but L’Ermita was truly captivating, quite different from the 2013, an extreme year, perhaps in an opposite way but truly exceptional. It deserved my highest rating, as my heart started beating faster as I put my nose in the glass. Bravo!”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (07/21)

    In Stock

  • Bodegas Tradicion Amontillado VORS

    £64.95

    “The NV Tradicion Amontillado VORS, certainly has the more complex and subtle nose of all these VORS and is on average 45 years old. It has a very clean nose, with elegance and complexity, powerful but subtle notes of hazelnuts, honey and even some dates. The medium-bodied palate shows a sharp wine with strong salinity, it has the power and the lightness, in a very difficult combination. 96 points

    Bodegas Tradicion, despite its name, is one of the youngest wineries in Jerez, it was created in 1998, something not so common, as most of the houses have been in operation for generations. It’s also unusual for a winery to sell exclusively old wines, even more so when it’s a young operation. But this is what Bodegas Tradicion is about. They purchased wines (botas and soleras) from everybody, Osborne, Bobadilla, Croft, Domecq, Sandeman? In the beginning they had maybe 200 botas, and now they own around 1,000. The market at the time when they started was extremely hard for Sherry, and trying to sell a new name, and exclusively old wines, was almost impossible. In 2003 they sold a grand total of 600 bottles, whereas nowadays they sell 18,000-20,0000 bottles per year. They kind of started the other way round, selling only VORS (and one VOS), and working their way towards younger wines to feed their soleras. They have now even released a Fino (a very old Fino, but a Fino after all), and they explained that even though they started buying very old soleras, they are now in need of younger wines, and they do not rule out the need to even purchase their own vineyards in the future. A Benjamin Button kind of winery! The wines are in charge of Jose Maria Quiros, who was winemaker at Agustin Blazquez and later at Domecq and has been a consultant for Alvear in Montilla-Moriles for 15 years. His aim is to preserve traditions and keep the wines as pure and true to their style as possible, and they come through as clean, elegant, precise, well-defined, focused, true to their type and indeed traditional. All wines have a hand-written lot number and year on the label.”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (208)

    In Stock

  • Bodegas Tradicion Oloroso VORS

    £62.99

    “The single vintage wines are different, but they are not necessarily better than the solera wines. In fact I preferred the Oloroso VORS to the two single-vintage; I found it more complex and fluid, while the single vintages were more concentrated and powerful, but not as nuanced. I’m talking about the NV Tradicion Oloroso VORS, on average 45-50 years old, which gives the wine a concentration of glycerin and dry extract that is amazing. Silky, very interesting to see the wine that has been blended over the years is more complex. The proverbial iron fist in a velvet glove, it is full-bodied, and still follows the same, clean, elegant, precise line of the rest of the wines from Tradicion. Drink 2013-2025. 95 points

    Bodegas Tradicion, despite its name, is one of the youngest wineries in Jerez, it was created in 1998, something not so common, as most of the houses have been in operation for generations. It’s also unusual for a winery to sell exclusively old wines, even more so when it’s a young operation. But this is what Bodegas Tradicion is about. They purchased wines (botas and soleras) from everybody, Osborne, Bobadilla, Croft, Domecq, Sandeman? In the beginning they had maybe 200 botas, and now they own around 1,000. The market at the time when they started was extremely hard for Sherry, and trying to sell a new name, and exclusively old wines, was almost impossible. In 2003 they sold a grand total of 600 bottles, whereas nowadays they sell 18,000-20,0000 bottles per year. They kind of started the other way round, selling only VORS (and one VOS), and working their way towards younger wines to feed their soleras. They have now even released a Fino (a very old Fino, but a Fino after all), and they explained that even though they started buying very old soleras, they are now in need of younger wines, and they do not rule out the need to even purchase their own vineyards in the future. A Benjamin Button kind of winery! The wines are in charge of Jose Maria Quiros, who was winemaker at Agustin Blazquez and later at Domecq and has been a consultant for Alvear in Montilla-Moriles for 15 years. His aim is to preserve traditions and keep the wines as pure and true to their style as possible, and they come through as clean, elegant, precise, well-defined, focused, true to their type and indeed traditional. All wines have a hand-written lot number and year on the label.”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (208)

    In Stock

  • Castro Ventosa Valtuille Cepas Centenarias 2018

    £69.99

    “The floral 2018 Valtuille Cepas Centenarias is the next vintage after the 2015, as no 2016 or 2017 could be produced. This has a Northern Rhône nose that mixes violets and smoked meat, very showy. The palate is seamless and refined, with very fine, silky tannins. Like many of their wines, 2018 could very well be the finest vintage of this wine to date. This has much lower alcohol (13.2%) and more acidity. In 2018, they used all the white grapes from one of the plots, which could be a significant 6% of white grapes, and also some 5% Merenzao, so the wine is somewhat more fluid and nuanced. The two plots used for this wine are in the paraje of Matalospardos in Valtuille. This is the most complete and complex of the 2018s. 3,500 bottles and 36 magnums were filled in early May 2020. Drink: 2020-2028. 97+ points

    Castro Ventosa is the winery of Raúl Pérez’s family. They are adapting to the new categories from the Bierzo appellation. They are focusing on their vineyards and regrafting some Merenzao now that is accepted by the DO. They are also turning their style toward more freshness in the wines, going for larger barrels; they have always had a very traditional profile. In the near future, there will be a new bottling from La Vitoriana, one of the most prestigious lieux-dits, from 2018. All of the 2018s have a lower alcoholic degree (all around 13.5%, when it was previously 14.5%) and feel very pure and clean, with better-integrated oak. Production varies widely depending on the vintage, between 150,000 and 250,000 bottles.”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (249)

    In Stock

  • Cota 45 Ube Carrascal 2018

    £46.99

    “Cota 45 is the personal project of Ramiro Ibañez, one of the most dynamic young winemakers in Jerez. He’s also involved in the renaissance of De La Riva together with his friend Willy Pérez; the Mayetería Sanluqueña project with small growers from his village; and he is the winemaker for La Callejuela. He has a small winery by the beach in Bajo de Guía in Sanlúcar de Barrameda. Without a doubt he is one of the pioneers in the new wave from Jerez.”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (234)

    In Stock

  • Cota 45 Ube Maina 2018

    £46.99

    “Cota 45 is the personal project of Ramiro Ibañez, one of the most dynamic young winemakers in Jerez. He’s also involved in the renaissance of De La Riva together with his friend Willy Pérez; the Mayetería Sanluqueña project with small growers from his village; and he is the winemaker for La Callejuela. He has a small winery by the beach in Bajo de Guía in Sanlúcar de Barrameda. Without a doubt he is one of the pioneers in the new wave from Jerez.”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (234)

    In Stock

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    Daniel Landi Cantos del Diablo 2018

    £59.99

    “The single-vineyard 2018 Cantos del Diablo was produced with the grapes from 0.35 hectares of 70-year-old Garnacha in the village of El Real de San Vicente (Toledo) at 900 meters in altitude, the highest vineyard in the Méntrida appellation. It’s a north-facing plot on sandy granite soils with lots of silt that deliver chalky tannins and a citrus freshness in the wine. The whole clusters fermented with indigenous yeasts in oak vats with a long maceration followed by an élevage in a 1,400-liter oak foudre for 12 months. This was extremely closed, even after a long time in the glass. It’s a vineyard that delivers more reductive wines (matchstick) with a strict palate and a strong mineral sensation. 1,620 bottles were filled in March 2020. Drink: 2020-2028. 95 points

    Some of the Comando G wines, produced in the same place and in exactly the same way, come from vineyards that were owned or worked by Daniel Gomez Jiménez-Landi when he worked at his family winery, and the wines are marketed separately under the Dani Landi (how people refer him) label. As with some of their other wines, I tasted the whole range of 2018s and some 2019s in November 2020.”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (11/20)

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    Daniel Landi El Reventon 2018

    £79.99

    “The Cebreros vineyard in the Paraje El Reventón produces wine that combines Mediterranean and continental characteristics, aromatic herbs and vibrant acidity, of which the 2018 El Reventón is a textbook example. The two plots total one hectare at 950 meters in altitude, on very laminated schist with sand, red clay, quartz and silt soils. The vines are 80 years old now and have been worked organically and biodynamically since Landi took them over. The whole clusters fermented slowly at low temperature with indigenous yeasts in oak vats, and the wine matured in two 700-liter oak barrels for 12 months. It seems like a textbook Reventón, with finesse and maintaining the aromatic herbs and the strong aromatics. The palate is narrow and precise, with very fine, grainy tannins and a sleek texture, unusual in the schist, going more in the direction of Iruelas. This is an exceptional vintage for this wine. 1,532 bottles were filled in March 2020. Drink: 2021-2030. 96 points

    Some of the Comando G wines, produced in the same place and in exactly the same way, come from vineyards that were owned or worked by Daniel Gomez Jiménez-Landi when he worked at his family winery, and the wines are marketed separately under the Dani Landi (how people refer him) label. As with some of their other wines, I tasted the whole range of 2018s and some 2019s in November 2020.”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (11/20)

    In Stock

  • Envinate Taganan Campanario 2018

    £49.99

    Three bottles available

    “The most anticipated Envínate white since they had to stop making the single-vineyard Amogoje is here, the 2018 Táganan Campanario Blanco from a one-hectare vineyard they purchased in late 2017 from Antonio Delgado, who is old and cannot work it anymore and his sons are not involved in the vineyards. This is from vineyard in the village of Almáciga in a zone known as El Campanario (the bell tower), from a north-facing plot that’s very close to the sea and planted with an unusual blend of grapes, mostly Forastera Gomera, Gual (known as Boal in Madeira) and Verdello plus of course Listán Blanco. The bottled wine is 12.5% alcohol with amazing freshness and incredible acidity readings, a pH of 3.05 and seven grams of acidity (measured in tartaric acid), if you think this is a subtropical island. It matured in neutral 600-liter oak barrels for 12 months without racking or any sulfur added to it. It has a golden color, from the varietal mix used. This comes from an amazing place that looks like a jungle (I was thinking of a coffee plantation in Peru or something like that), and it’s incredible how fresh the wine is. This is the lower part of the vineyard they used to vinify and bottle separately, Amogoge. This is highly personal and somewhat reminds me of some whites from the island of La Palma with a somewhat medicinal undertone that makes it quite different. 1,300 bottles were filled in January 2020. Drink: 2020-2028. 96 points

    2018 is a great vintage for the Envínate wines from Tenerife. The ones from the south, from Santiago del Teide, are clearly superior to the 2017s. And the ones from the north, Taganana and Valle de la Orotava, which were better than the ones from the south in 2017, are the best wines they have produced to date. They have some new (old) vineyards in Tacoronte, a traditional zone in Tenerife, so there will be a new wine from that appellation in future years, as the first grapes will be picked in a few days.”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (250)

    In Stock

  • Guimaro Finca Meixeman 2019

    £26.99

    “The single-vineyard 2019 Finca Meixeman comes from one of their oldest vineyards, planted with a field blend of 80% Mencía and 20% Brancellao, Merenzao, Garnacha, Mouratón, Negreda and Sousón. It has an austere nose that benefitted from being in the glass for over one hour, so decanting in advance might be a good idea if you are going to pull the cork any time soon. It has subtle notes of violets and wild berries and herbs. It has 13% alcohol but, despite that, feels a little riper than the other 2019s, perhaps more approachable and gourmand. There are some 8,000 bottles. It was bottled in February 2021. Drink: 2022-2030. 96 points

    Pedro “Guímaro” thinks 2019 could be one of the finest vintages of recent times, with textbook conditions and a perfect (and long) cycle for the grape. 2020 was a warmer vintage than 2019, but the profile of the wines is still quite fresh although with a little more alcohol. It was a low-yielding year—25% or 30% less than normal—which, combined with one week of very warm weather, increased the ripeness and concentration. 2021 can be considered a classic vintage in the style of yesteryear, with a very fresh wine profile. It was a very challenging year in the vineyards, with lots of rain and cold weather, a little in the style of 2013. Yields were generous.

    They are experimenting with granite eggs and also testing fortified wines with the great help of Niepoort, with whom they also produce a dry red, Ladredo. In 2020 there will be two new wines, one Miño and one Sil, and the 2018 and 2019 from the granite eggs, but the wines were not ready when I tasted.”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (259)

    In Stock

  • Guimaro Single Vineyard 2017 Six

    £350.00

    This selection includes three bottles of each of these wines:

    Guimaro Finca Capelinos 2017

    “There are no single vineyards bottled in 2016, as the grapes were destroyed by hail, so I tasted the 2017 Finca Capeliños. They used 65% full clusters in 2017 and a shorter maceration than in other years, perhaps because the very short growing season (the grapes were harvested earlier than ever) delivered less ripe seeds and stems, so that a longer maceration would have extracted harsher tannins. The dry and warm year was saved by some rain just before the harvest that allowed the grapes to develop flavors and aromas, because they were not present before. The result is very impressive. This is always the most elegant from the single-plot bottlings; the extremely old vineyard seems to provide an extra degree of nuance, and the grapes are nicely balanced, maintaining the acidity to provide the wine with freshness. 2017 is a warm year with powerful wines, a little in the style of 2015, but I see a tad more elegance and better balance here. There is power and concentration, with ripeness that is not noticed (there’s 14% alcohol). It has plenty of fine-grained tannins that would benefit from some time in bottle. It should develop effortlessly for a decade. A great Capeliños. 800 bottles produced. Drink: 2019-2027. 96+ points

    The terrible frost on the 15th of August 2016 made it impossible to produce the single-vineyard bottlings from that vintage.; they had to work hard to recover the vines, as they lost some vines to frost, and hail killed both very young (up to 12% in the new A Ponte) and very old plants. In 2017, the frost didn’t touch them other than in some plots for the generic red; and they started recovering their normal speed and had an atypical vintage, as everything sped up. They started harvesting in August and finished on the 12th of September, compared to a normal year, when the harvest happens between mid-September and mid-October. It was a very dry and warm year. But harvesting early and using some other varieties other than Mencía (Mouratón, Caíño, Brancellao) to pump up the acidity helped balance the wines.

    As for 2016, they only produced the generic wines and released a new wine, Camiño Real, from small plots across Amandi. In 2015 they had started with another single vineyard from newly planted vines, A Ponte, which was not produced in 2016 but comes back in 2017.

    They have purchased some new plots of very old vines on slate, around one hectare in a slightly cooler zone and with some more soil in an abandoned village called San Pedro at the beginning of Amandi, and they might eventually plant some more. He’s also focusing a bit more on Brancellao, the variety that Pedro Pérez .”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (241)

    Guimaro Finca Pombeiras 2017

    “There was no 2016 as the vineyards were hit by a terrible hailstorm the 15th of August 2016, so I only tasted the 2017 Finca Pombeiras. This is always more powerful and has a little more tannin than Finca Capeliños. This is from a south-facing plot on mainly schist soils (but there’s also a little granite), and it was fermented with 100% full clusters, which usually lends to a more powerful wine. In 2017, the character of the vineyard clearly comes through. It’s always a wine that takes longer than Capeliños to open up. They have been fine-tuning these single-plot wines, especially after 2013; they’ve been harvesting earlier, trying to get more freshness and improve the drinkability of the wines. This is still extremely young, primary and undeveloped and should blossom with one more year in bottle, but it’s not harsh at all and could be enjoyed young with powerful food. Some 800 bottles produced. Drink: 2020-2027. 95+ points”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (241)

    In Stock

  • Rafael Palacios As Sortes 2020

    £49.99

    “As with the other wines, I also tasted the 2020 As Sortes next to the 2019. The vineyards and process were the same, native fermentation in 500-liter French oak barrels, where the wine matured with fine lees for eight months. But 2020 is riper than 2019 (14.4% vs 14%), and it also has a lower pH and higher acidity. Like the Louro, this feels closed, primary and a little reductive at first. It took time in the glass to open up. The vineyards here are able to cushion the effect of the vintage, and the viticulture they have been doing (organic and biodynamic) makes for concentrated wines that are also more closed early on and then need more time in bottle. The palate references a very mineral wine with a powerful mineral strike. It improved tremendously in the glass over the course of a couple of hours. 18,500 bottles produced. It was bottled in June 2021. Drink: 2023-2030. 95+ points

    I tasted the 2019s and 2020s from Rafa Palacios in Valdeorras. For him, these are two very good years. 2019 had a mild and dry winter and a rainy and cold spring that delayed budding, followed by a mild summer with fewer hours of sunshine, which meant a delay in the ripening process. Harvest was more than one month later than usual, and the grapes achieved very slow ripening and full development of aromas and flavors while keeping the acidity. The harvest started in October and finished in November. It’s a beautiful, homogeneous vintage with very good wines.

    2020 saw a moderately cool and rainy winter and a dry and cold spring that resulted in 20% less bunches than in 2019. The summer was also quite dry but, fortunately, not too hot. Given the low yields, maturation was accelerated, and the harvest began at the beginning of September for Louro and from September 25th for As Sortes. Given the scarce water, the plants had to work harder deep down into the soil, which marked the wines; the silica and quartz from the sandy soils of O Bolo shaped a saline identity and the wines achieved a lot of elegance and balance. It’s a more heterogeneous vintage, and the higher-altitude vineyards behaved better. The 2020 O Soro is out of this world.

    He gave me a quick preview of the very cold 2021, a vin de garde vintage but a challenging year with a lot of rain. They are in the process of certifying their vineyards (organic and biodynamic), but they have some problems in the vineyards with neighbors who are not organic, so it will probably be faster for O Soro and Sorte Antiga.”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (259)

    In Stock