Spain


Showing 1–12 of 31 results

  • Alvaro Palacios Les Terrasses 2018

    £34.99

    “The 2018 Les Terrasses Velles Vinyes is a blend of 55% Garnacha with 44% Cariñena and 1% white grapes. The destemmed and lightly crushed grapes fermented in concrete and oak vats with indigenous yeasts, and the wine matured in barriques for 13 months. It keeps the more rustic side of their wines but with the finesse of 2018. It’s a wine marked by a high percentage of Cariñena, but it’s velvety and fresh but with the dustier tannins, harmonious. This is the British farmer, rustic but elegant with his Land Rover, the Wellington boots, corduroy trousers and a Barbour jacket … but with a Priorat twang. Drink: 2020-2028. 94 points

    Álvaro Palacios is on a roll with the 2018s, which are impressive across the range, not only in Priorat but in Bierzo and Rioja too. In Priorat, he has 47 hectares of vineyards, 42 of them in the village of Gratallops. Like what happened with Rioja, they saw a return to more normal conditions with the 2018 vintage, more classic weather. Palacios calls it a “reunion” with snow, which he says always seems to bring something magic. There was more rain in the spring and the dry, Mediterranean summer, with a special moment during the harvest when heavy rains appeared, so he decided to wait and give time for the grapes to soak it up; the alcoholic degree went down and the wines also have more acidity. 2018 has something of 2010, 2012 and 2016 but with more finesse, 2018 being a more powerful but more elegant version of 2016, which are the two most elegant vintages of recent times for Palacios. There is a little more Cariñena in most of the wines from 2018. Also, there is a new wine in 2018, La Baixada. 2019 is a unique year, highly concentrated, like a warm and dry version of the already unique 2013. Annual production averages 415,000 bottles.”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (06/20)

    In Stock

  • Bodegas Tradicion Amontillado VORS

    £64.95

    “The NV Tradicion Amontillado VORS, certainly has the more complex and subtle nose of all these VORS and is on average 45 years old. It has a very clean nose, with elegance and complexity, powerful but subtle notes of hazelnuts, honey and even some dates. The medium-bodied palate shows a sharp wine with strong salinity, it has the power and the lightness, in a very difficult combination. 96 points

    Bodegas Tradicion, despite its name, is one of the youngest wineries in Jerez, it was created in 1998, something not so common, as most of the houses have been in operation for generations. It’s also unusual for a winery to sell exclusively old wines, even more so when it’s a young operation. But this is what Bodegas Tradicion is about. They purchased wines (botas and soleras) from everybody, Osborne, Bobadilla, Croft, Domecq, Sandeman? In the beginning they had maybe 200 botas, and now they own around 1,000. The market at the time when they started was extremely hard for Sherry, and trying to sell a new name, and exclusively old wines, was almost impossible. In 2003 they sold a grand total of 600 bottles, whereas nowadays they sell 18,000-20,0000 bottles per year. They kind of started the other way round, selling only VORS (and one VOS), and working their way towards younger wines to feed their soleras. They have now even released a Fino (a very old Fino, but a Fino after all), and they explained that even though they started buying very old soleras, they are now in need of younger wines, and they do not rule out the need to even purchase their own vineyards in the future. A Benjamin Button kind of winery! The wines are in charge of Jose Maria Quiros, who was winemaker at Agustin Blazquez and later at Domecq and has been a consultant for Alvear in Montilla-Moriles for 15 years. His aim is to preserve traditions and keep the wines as pure and true to their style as possible, and they come through as clean, elegant, precise, well-defined, focused, true to their type and indeed traditional. All wines have a hand-written lot number and year on the label.”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (208)

    In Stock

  • Bodegas Tradicion Oloroso VORS

    £62.99

    “The single vintage wines are different, but they are not necessarily better than the solera wines. In fact I preferred the Oloroso VORS to the two single-vintage; I found it more complex and fluid, while the single vintages were more concentrated and powerful, but not as nuanced. I’m talking about the NV Tradicion Oloroso VORS, on average 45-50 years old, which gives the wine a concentration of glycerin and dry extract that is amazing. Silky, very interesting to see the wine that has been blended over the years is more complex. The proverbial iron fist in a velvet glove, it is full-bodied, and still follows the same, clean, elegant, precise line of the rest of the wines from Tradicion. Drink 2013-2025. 95 points

    Bodegas Tradicion, despite its name, is one of the youngest wineries in Jerez, it was created in 1998, something not so common, as most of the houses have been in operation for generations. It’s also unusual for a winery to sell exclusively old wines, even more so when it’s a young operation. But this is what Bodegas Tradicion is about. They purchased wines (botas and soleras) from everybody, Osborne, Bobadilla, Croft, Domecq, Sandeman? In the beginning they had maybe 200 botas, and now they own around 1,000. The market at the time when they started was extremely hard for Sherry, and trying to sell a new name, and exclusively old wines, was almost impossible. In 2003 they sold a grand total of 600 bottles, whereas nowadays they sell 18,000-20,0000 bottles per year. They kind of started the other way round, selling only VORS (and one VOS), and working their way towards younger wines to feed their soleras. They have now even released a Fino (a very old Fino, but a Fino after all), and they explained that even though they started buying very old soleras, they are now in need of younger wines, and they do not rule out the need to even purchase their own vineyards in the future. A Benjamin Button kind of winery! The wines are in charge of Jose Maria Quiros, who was winemaker at Agustin Blazquez and later at Domecq and has been a consultant for Alvear in Montilla-Moriles for 15 years. His aim is to preserve traditions and keep the wines as pure and true to their style as possible, and they come through as clean, elegant, precise, well-defined, focused, true to their type and indeed traditional. All wines have a hand-written lot number and year on the label.”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (208)

    In Stock

  • Castro Ventosa Valtuille Cepas Centenarias 2018

    £45.99

    “The floral 2018 Valtuille Cepas Centenarias is the next vintage after the 2015, as no 2016 or 2017 could be produced. This has a Northern Rhône nose that mixes violets and smoked meat, very showy. The palate is seamless and refined, with very fine, silky tannins. Like many of their wines, 2018 could very well be the finest vintage of this wine to date. This has much lower alcohol (13.2%) and more acidity. In 2018, they used all the white grapes from one of the plots, which could be a significant 6% of white grapes, and also some 5% Merenzao, so the wine is somewhat more fluid and nuanced. The two plots used for this wine are in the paraje of Matalospardos in Valtuille. This is the most complete and complex of the 2018s. 3,500 bottles and 36 magnums were filled in early May 2020. Drink: 2020-2028. 97+ points

    Castro Ventosa is the winery of Raúl Pérez’s family. They are adapting to the new categories from the Bierzo appellation. They are focusing on their vineyards and regrafting some Merenzao now that is accepted by the DO. They are also turning their style toward more freshness in the wines, going for larger barrels; they have always had a very traditional profile. In the near future, there will be a new bottling from La Vitoriana, one of the most prestigious lieux-dits, from 2018. All of the 2018s have a lower alcoholic degree (all around 13.5%, when it was previously 14.5%) and feel very pure and clean, with better-integrated oak. Production varies widely depending on the vintage, between 150,000 and 250,000 bottles.”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (249)

    In Stock

  • Contino Graciano Rioja 2016

    £44.99

    “I sampled two vintages of the Graciano bottling, but only the 2016 Graciano was in bottle, and the 2017 was still in tank. 2016 was a warm and healthy harvest that delivered quantity and quality. It has very good freshness and a fine thread on the palate, with vibrant acidity and an electric sensation. It’s dry and leaves a chalky sensation on the palate. The wine had a slightly longer élevage of 26 months, and part of the time was in used barrels. The nose has bright aromas and better integrated oak. It feels varietal, and the acidity feels subtler and folded into the fruit, and the character reminds me of the first vintages of this wine. This should age nicely in bottle. 3,332 bottles were filled in February 2019. Drink: 2019-2019. 94 points

    Contino changed winemakers before the 2017, when Jorge Navascués took over from Jesús Madrazo. I have now tasted the first wines from Navascues, and there is a slight change in style. 2017 was the earliest harvest ever, but they didn’t suffer from the frost, lack of rain and warm weather. Many of the wines are now bottled in Burgundy bottles, the traditional one in Rioja Alavesa.”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (243)

    In Stock

  • Contino Vina del Olivo Rioja 2016

    £57.99

    “The 2016 Viña del Olivo has to be one of the finest recent vintages of this wine. It’s powerful and elegant and has great balance and a lively palate, with focused flavors, great purity and integrated oak. It’s very young and seems to have all the ingredients for a long development in bottle. It’s tasty, long, very pure and is salty rather than sweet. 13,881 bottles produced. Drink: 2020-2032. 95 points

    Contino changed winemakers before the 2017, when Jorge Navascués took over from Jesús Madrazo. I have now tasted the first wines from Navascues, and there is a slight change in style. 2017 was the earliest harvest ever, but they didn’t suffer from the frost, lack of rain and warm weather. Many of the wines are now bottled in Burgundy bottles, the traditional one in Rioja Alavesa.”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (243)

    In Stock

  • Cota 45 Ube Carrascal 2017

    £44.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Cota 45 Ube Maina 2017

    £44.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Daniel Landi Cantos del Diablo 2018

    £79.99

    “The single-vineyard 2018 Cantos del Diablo was produced with the grapes from 0.35 hectares of 70-year-old Garnacha in the village of El Real de San Vicente (Toledo) at 900 meters in altitude, the highest vineyard in the Méntrida appellation. It’s a north-facing plot on sandy granite soils with lots of silt that deliver chalky tannins and a citrus freshness in the wine. The whole clusters fermented with indigenous yeasts in oak vats with a long maceration followed by an élevage in a 1,400-liter oak foudre for 12 months. This was extremely closed, even after a long time in the glass. It’s a vineyard that delivers more reductive wines (matchstick) with a strict palate and a strong mineral sensation. 1,620 bottles were filled in March 2020. Drink: 2020-2028. 95 points

    Some of the Comando G wines, produced in the same place and in exactly the same way, come from vineyards that were owned or worked by Daniel Gomez Jiménez-Landi when he worked at his family winery, and the wines are marketed separately under the Dani Landi (how people refer him) label. As with some of their other wines, I tasted the whole range of 2018s and some 2019s in November 2020.”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (11/20)

    In Stock

  • Daniel Landi El Reventon 2018

    £94.99

    “The Cebreros vineyard in the Paraje El Reventón produces wine that combines Mediterranean and continental characteristics, aromatic herbs and vibrant acidity, of which the 2018 El Reventón is a textbook example. The two plots total one hectare at 950 meters in altitude, on very laminated schist with sand, red clay, quartz and silt soils. The vines are 80 years old now and have been worked organically and biodynamically since Landi took them over. The whole clusters fermented slowly at low temperature with indigenous yeasts in oak vats, and the wine matured in two 700-liter oak barrels for 12 months. It seems like a textbook Reventón, with finesse and maintaining the aromatic herbs and the strong aromatics. The palate is narrow and precise, with very fine, grainy tannins and a sleek texture, unusual in the schist, going more in the direction of Iruelas. This is an exceptional vintage for this wine. 1,532 bottles were filled in March 2020. Drink: 2021-2030. 96 points

    Some of the Comando G wines, produced in the same place and in exactly the same way, come from vineyards that were owned or worked by Daniel Gomez Jiménez-Landi when he worked at his family winery, and the wines are marketed separately under the Dani Landi (how people refer him) label. As with some of their other wines, I tasted the whole range of 2018s and some 2019s in November 2020.”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (11/20)

    In Stock

  • Daniel Landi Las Iruelas 2018

    £109.99

    “Always a wine of incredible lightness and energy, the 2018 Las Iruelas excels in a year like 2018. It is delicate and floral and comes from a relatively large 1.1-hectare vineyard in the valley that names the wine, in the village of El Tiemblo in the province of Ávila in the Gredos wine region. It’s a very steep slope that faces east and gets the morning sun, but it is protected by the mountain from the afternoon sun. The soil is quite unique, as it contains a mixture of granite and schist, laminated and with vertical veins that allow the roots to go very deep. The soils are very shallow, barely 20 centimeters and are rich in sand, quartz and silt. The climate is also quite unique—it gets abundant rains since it’s located in a place where storms get trapped between the Tiétar and Alberche Valleys. The bunches are painstakingly cleaned, and every grape that is less than perfect is removed before they are put into oak vats to ferment with the natural yeasts, with a soft vinification and an infusion of very long macerations. The wine matured in a 1,400-liter oak vat for 12 months. This is ethereal, transparent, aromatic and nuanced, with incredible energy but with a silky mouthfeel that makes it feel light but has amazing inner power! It has to be the most elegant vintage of Iruelas. 1,785 bottles were filled in March 2020. Drink: 2020-2030. 98 points

    Some of the Comando G wines, produced in the same place and in exactly the same way, come from vineyards that were owned or worked by Daniel Gomez Jiménez-Landi when he worked at his family winery, and the wines are marketed separately under the Dani Landi (how people refer him) label. As with some of their other wines, I tasted the whole range of 2018s and some 2019s in November 2020.”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (11/20)

    In Stock

  • Finca Villacreces Nebro 2016

    £149.99

    “Produced with the fruit from one plot that is believed to have been planted in 1920, the 2016 Nebro is powerful and concentrated but still very oaky after 12 months in foudre and two months in barrique. It has abundant spicy and toasty notes, black fruit, peat, graphite and licorice. It’s full-bodied and tannic. Will it come into balance with time in bottle? 1,188 bottles and 100 magnums were filled in July 2018. Drink: 2022-2028. 93? points

    The 154 hectares of vineyards from Finca Villacreces have been certified organic since 2017, but the wines do not carry the organic certification. They produce between 500,000 and 750,000 bottles depending on the vintage.

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (255)

    In Stock