White


Showing 37–48 of 207 results

  • Domaines Leflaive Macon-Ige 2020

    £39.95

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Domaines Leflaive Macon-Verze 2020

    £37.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Domaines Leflaive Macon-Verze Les Chenes 2020

    £41.95

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • DuMOL Charles Heintz Vineyard Isobel Chardonnay 2018

    £79.95

    “The 2018 Chardonnay Isobel Charles Heintz Vineyard captures all of the grandeur and exoticism that make the best wines from this site so incredibly compelling. Apricot, white flowers, white pepper and marzipan envelop the palate. As always, the Heintz Chardonnay is marked by a very distinctive feeling of oiliness. The 2018 is all class. Drinking window: 2021-2028. 95 points

    My tastings at DuMOL are usually pretty epic, as I sample two vintages of pretty much the entire range. The pandemic made a visit this year impossible, so this report focuses on the bottled 2018s. The wines are brilliant across the board, just as they were from barrel. Winemaker Andy Smith describes 2018 as a year with moderate temperatures, especially at harvest time, which allowed for picking tiny sections of vineyards in small, separate passes. From top to bottom, this is an impressive lineup.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (01/21)

    In Stock

  • DuMOL Estate Chardonnay 2016

    £79.99

    “The 2016 Chardonnay Estate Vineyard is rich and creamy, with a hint of reduction that adds an intriguing upper register of freshness. Orchard fruit, mint, white pepper and chalk are nicely woven throughout. The Estate is a wonderfully complete Chardonnay from DuMol that will drink well for many years to come. Drinking window: 2019-2026. 95 points

    Andy Smith and his team turned out a brilliant set of wines in 2017. The harvest was especially condensed, with most days seeing heavy picks of both Pinot Noir and Chardonnay pretty much concurrently. Smith told me the DuMOL parcels were affected by a high incidence of shot berries, which naturally lowered yields. Small berries, often with no seeds, further resulted in a collection of dense wines. Smith told me low alcohol conversions resulted in wines with a bit lower alcohol than is typical. That is fascinating, as the wines are quite rich in feel. The bottled 2016s are just as compelling from bottle as they were last year from barrel.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (05/19)

    In Stock

  • DuMOL Highland Divide Chardonnay 2017

    £60.95

    “The 2017 Chardonnay Highland Divide is a sort of super-appellation wine made from a blend of fruit from the estate and Morelli that offers quite a bit of exuberance in both its flavors and textures. Orange peel, honeysuckle, wild flowers and tropical accents all grace this wonderfully inviting Chardonnay from DuMol. I loved it. Drinking window: 2020-2027. 93 points

    Over the years, I have learned to allow for plenty of time for my tastings at DuMol. I was super-impressed with the wines I tasted on my last visit. Andy Smith continues to grow the range thoughtfully. The Chardonnays and Pinots remain the strong suits, mostly because they form the core of the range and have really been fine tuned over time. The 2017 Chardonnays have turned out just as well as I had hoped they would. The wines are rich, deep and full of character. Today, I favor the 2017s over the 2018s, which come across as lighter. Then again, the Chardonnays see pretty long élevage (by California standards) of 11 months in oak and 6 months in steel (for the vineyard designates) so there is plenty of time for the 2018s to perhaps gain a bit more dimension. The two vintages appear closer in quality for Pinot Noir. Smith opted to handle the 2018s very gently in the cellar, and did half the number of punchdowns than the norm. Both the 2017s and 2018s are vivid and super-expressive. I favor 2018 over 2017 for the Cabernets and Syrahs, as the longer and more benign growing season was clearly more favorable for both varieties.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (01/20)

    In Stock

  • DuMOL Hyde Vineyard Chardonnay 2018

    £67.95

    “The sole Napa Chardonnay in this range, the 2018 Chardonnay Hyde Vineyard is ample and broad in feel. Apricot, tangerine oil, spice, vanillin and tropical fruit all show the richer, more extroverted side of Chardonnay to great effect. The Hyde is more power than finesse, and there is plenty of the former. Drinking window: 2022-2028. 93 points

    My tastings at DuMOL are usually pretty epic, as I sample two vintages of pretty much the entire range. The pandemic made a visit this year impossible, so this report focuses on the bottled 2018s. The wines are brilliant across the board, just as they were from barrel. Winemaker Andy Smith describes 2018 as a year with moderate temperatures, especially at harvest time, which allowed for picking tiny sections of vineyards in small, separate passes. From top to bottom, this is an impressive lineup.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (01/21)

    In Stock

  • Egon Muller Scharzhof Riesling QbA 2020

    £49.99

    “Apple seed and apple wood accents lend decisive counterpoint on both nose and palate to the 2020 Riesling Scharzhof’s dominant, crunchy apple and zesty lemon fruit. Suggestions of apple blossom hover throughout. The feel is firm, and the lingering finish offers refreshment as well as stimulating cut and piquancy. (The source vineyards for this large cuvée are once again largely Saarburger Rausch, Wiltinger Braunfels and Oberemmeler Rosenberg.) Drinking window: 2021-2029. 89 points

    Harvest in 2020 began here only on September 20 – one week before the arrival of rain – but that represents an early commencement date for this estate. The fruit during that first week was deemed ideal for Kabinett, as indeed the finished results testify. The rain made for a stop-and-go subsequent harvest, and also triggered botrytis, but none of it dried sufficiently until mid-November for Müller to finally feel confident in selecting for an Auslese, which was designated “Goldkapsel” and sold at auction. “Certainly, it was a warm vintage when one considers summer temperatures,” noted Müller’s commercial director Veronika Lintner, with whom I tasted, “but average temperatures through the whole growing season were much lower than in 2019 or in 2018, and one can certainly sense that in animation and a cooling cast to the wines.” That very much applies to the Spätlesen even though these also exhibit very ripe fruit flavors and subtle botrytis influence. Thanks to an absence of spring frost, a good set, little of the sunburn that had been experienced in 2019, and scant botrytis, 2020 recorded a relatively large crop by estate standards.

    The May 2019 frost reached into even upper sections of the Scharzhofberg, and summer sunburn took a further bite out of yield that nature had already predetermined would be small. And that was before a harvest that demanded selectivity, which at this address is notoriously scrupulous. Picking did not begin until September 30, so Auslese was already being selected even as the fruit for Kabinett was brought in. A second wave of rain and botrytis was accompanied by gradual diminution of acidity, leading to an intensely active second week of October and an October 18 completion date. A tiny amount of TBA was rendered, but no BA or Goldkapsel Auslese. Cellarmaster Heiner Bollig (about whose arrival I wrote in the introduction to my report on Egon Müller’s 2018s) essentially debuted in 2019 and was, one presumes, also behind the decision to attempt Grosse Gewächse (about which I also wrote in my last report). Veronika Lintner confirmed on the occasion of my November 2021 visit that release of a 2019 Grosses Gewächs is indeed planned – which would be the first dry wine from this estate in several decades – but that it’s been decided to give it another year or two in the bottle first. Speaking of future releases, Müller plans to continue his justly attention-getting series of auctioned Kabinett Alte Reben bottlings, but there will never again be more than one bottling meriting that designation or one fuder’s worth – and quite possibly less. For several years, the estate’s remaining share of ungrafted vines has displayed visible signs of phylloxera incursion, and after 2020, a significant share of those that informed the Alte Reben bottlings were ripped out and replaced. In addition to the aforementioned, as yet unreleased TBA and Grosses Gewächs, there are ten vintage 2019 bottlings, of which I was able to taste four, the others being the generic Scharzhof, a Braune Kupp Auslese, and pairs of “regular” Kabinett and Spätlese.

    David Schildknecht, Vinous (05/22)

    In Stock

  • Egon Muller Scharzhofberger Riesling Auslese 2017

    £575.00

    “While this Auslese harbors marginally less acidity than its Spätlese counterpart, there is a blazingly bright, invigorating, almost severe sense of grapefruit, pineapple and lemon concentrates, along with piquancy of zests and seeds that engenders a near-indelible palate impression. The wine’s citricity is beautifully complemented by creamy-richness of texture as well as by flavors of quince preserves, white peach syrup and white raisin. A vibrantly sustained finish is at once invigoratingly tangy and envelopingly rich. Drinking window: 2019-2050. 94 points

    Müller’s losses to frost were largely in the Saarburg vineyards that are the mainstay of his basic Scharzberg Riesling – with the consequence that its production volume did not even equal that of this year’s Scharzhofberger Kabinett. “Any losses we experienced in Wiltingen,” opined Egon Müller’s assistant Veronika Lintner, “simply helped with concentration,” and this year’s wines certainly don’t lack that! Egon Müller indicated not the least displeasure with the rain that fell in September 2017, since it triggered the botrytis he looks for, so that despite this having been (after 2003) his estate’s earliest recorded harvest – commencing on September 25 – he ended up with a glorious collection of nobly sweet wines. “We had beautiful botrytis right from the beginning,” related Lintner, “and we didn’t miss a day doing selection.” By October 15, harvest was over. “It was very warm during midsummer,” noted Lintner, “but not so warm as [in 2018]. We anticipated a collection rather like 2011 – lovely, if perhaps wanting a bit for acidity. But [instead] the cooler weather as harvest approached, especially at night, locked in acids.” When pressed on the matter, she acknowledged that shutdown in the vines during midsummer might also have contributed to the higher-than-anticipated acid levels. “There was one really hot period,” she recollected, “though not as long a one as [in 2018], when there was definitely shutdown.” Lintner perceives 2017’s combination of high ripeness and high extract as having conduced to “relatively muscular, weightier wines than in 2016, when the wines were unusually slim and filigreed.”

    The 2017 collection here includes a Trockenbeerenauslese that Müller elected not to auction but instead (as he has done once or twice before in the recent past) to sell directly to his importers and other agents as an opportunity and token of gratitude. This had for me the unfortunate consequence that I could not taste that wine when I visited as usual in late summer. “We also picked and vinified in anticipation of a Beerenauslese,” explained Lintner, “but there was a very tiny potential volume, and in the end we decided to split it up, part going to the eventual gold capsule Auslese and the other to the Trockenbeerenauslese.””

    David Schildknecht, Vinous (10/19)

    In Stock

  • Egon Muller Scharzhofberger Riesling Kabinett 2020

    £149.95

    “The “regular” 2020 Riesling Scharzhotberger Kabinett (bearing AP. #3) leads with quince and peach accented by mint, cress, ginger and lemon, setting up an overall impression of coolness, but also of brightness, with stimulating cut and pungency analogous to that of the corresponding Braune Kupp. In the background is a greenhouse-like amalgam of flowers and foliage. The phenolic concentration here belies a vintage with relatively generous yields even as the efficacious acidity and levity defy preconceptions concerning a year marked by summer heat and drought. The multifaceted finish, transparent to wet stone underpinnings, is tongue-tinglingly vibrant. Here is a Riesling Kabinett to really grab and hold your attention even as it delivers consummate refreshment and a bit of thought-provoking intrigue to accompany its entertainment value. Drinking window: 2021-2035. 93 points

    Harvest in 2020 began here only on September 20 – one week before the arrival of rain – but that represents an early commencement date for this estate. The fruit during that first week was deemed ideal for Kabinett, as indeed the finished results testify. The rain made for a stop-and-go subsequent harvest, and also triggered botrytis, but none of it dried sufficiently until mid-November for Müller to finally feel confident in selecting for an Auslese, which was designated “Goldkapsel” and sold at auction. “Certainly, it was a warm vintage when one considers summer temperatures,” noted Müller’s commercial director Veronika Lintner, with whom I tasted, “but average temperatures through the whole growing season were much lower than in 2019 or in 2018, and one can certainly sense that in animation and a cooling cast to the wines.” That very much applies to the Spätlesen even though these also exhibit very ripe fruit flavors and subtle botrytis influence. Thanks to an absence of spring frost, a good set, little of the sunburn that had been experienced in 2019, and scant botrytis, 2020 recorded a relatively large crop by estate standards.

    The May 2019 frost reached into even upper sections of the Scharzhofberg, and summer sunburn took a further bite out of yield that nature had already predetermined would be small. And that was before a harvest that demanded selectivity, which at this address is notoriously scrupulous. Picking did not begin until September 30, so Auslese was already being selected even as the fruit for Kabinett was brought in. A second wave of rain and botrytis was accompanied by gradual diminution of acidity, leading to an intensely active second week of October and an October 18 completion date. A tiny amount of TBA was rendered, but no BA or Goldkapsel Auslese. Cellarmaster Heiner Bollig (about whose arrival I wrote in the introduction to my report on Egon Müller’s 2018s) essentially debuted in 2019 and was, one presumes, also behind the decision to attempt Grosse Gewächse (about which I also wrote in my last report). Veronika Lintner confirmed on the occasion of my November 2021 visit that release of a 2019 Grosses Gewächs is indeed planned – which would be the first dry wine from this estate in several decades – but that it’s been decided to give it another year or two in the bottle first. Speaking of future releases, Müller plans to continue his justly attention-getting series of auctioned Kabinett Alte Reben bottlings, but there will never again be more than one bottling meriting that designation or one fuder’s worth – and quite possibly less. For several years, the estate’s remaining share of ungrafted vines has displayed visible signs of phylloxera incursion, and after 2020, a significant share of those that informed the Alte Reben bottlings were ripped out and replaced. In addition to the aforementioned, as yet unreleased TBA and Grosses Gewächs, there are ten vintage 2019 bottlings, of which I was able to taste four, the others being the generic Scharzhof, a Braune Kupp Auslese, and pairs of “regular” Kabinett and Spätlese.“

    David Schildknecht, Vinous (05/22)

    In Stock

  • Emmerich Knoll Gruner Veltliner Ried Schutt Smaragd 2018

    £49.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Emmerich Knoll Gruner Veltliner Vinothekfullung Smaragd 2018

    £67.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock