White


Showing 1–12 of 60 results

  • Albert Mann Gewurztraminer Furstentum Grand Cru Vieilles Vignes 2017

    £33.75

    “Luminous golden-tinged straw-yellow. Very refined yet intense aromas and flavors of sweet spices, lemon curd, and smoke. Classy, archetypal Gewürz, with an extremely long and silky yet vibrant finish. The violet note is typical of the Furstentum; the vieilles vignes moniker refers to the fact that these vines are at least 45 years old. This is another big Gewürz but still comes across as relatively light on its feet (13.5% alcohol, 32 g/L r.s. and 4.5 g/L total acidity; curiously, the last two numbers are identical to those of the 2016 Furstentum Vieilles Vignes). The Furstentum is a magical site for Gewürz. Drinking window: 2020-2028. 94+ points

    Over the course of just two nights at the end of April 2017 on which frost hit hard, the estate lost about 45% of its crop. Marie-Thèrese Barthelmy told me that she remembers budbreak taking place on March 25, and that on March 31 their cherry tree was already in bloom; then, on April 21, the roof fell and frost wiped out entire vineyards. Harvest began earlier than usual and was also finished fast, over just three weeks. What wines the estate did manage to produce are, as always, superb”

    Ian D’Agata, Vinous (01/19)

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  • Albert Mann Riesling Schlossberg Grand Cru 2019

    £57.95

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Antoine Arena Carco Vermentino 2020

    £36.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Bernard & Thierry Glantenay Puligny-Montrachet Premier Cru Les Folatieres 2017

    £79.99

    “Pretty and expressive, the 2017 Puligny-Montrachet 1er Cru Les Folatières offers up notes of crisp pear, ripe lemon and a touch of struck matchstick from its recent bottling, followed by a medium to full-bodied, satiny palate with tangy acids, nice chewy extract and a chalky finish. It’s one of the finest white wines I’ve tasted from Glantenay. Drink: 2019-2029. 93 points

    The disarmingly modest Thierry Glantenay is emerging as one of the Côte de Beaune’s most exciting producers of red wine. From his hillside winery overlooking the Marquis d’Angerville’s Clos des Ducs, Glantenay is producing a lovely range of elegant, pure and intense Volnays and Pommards that are increasingly consistent and stylistically assured. In the cuverie, he tells me, he is more and more content to let temperature and alcohol do the work of extraction for him, keeping pigéage and rémontage to a minimum; pressing is gentle; and élevage, without racking until the mise en bouteille, takes place in at most 30% new barrels. In the cellar, no matter which barrel you choose, the wines taste reliably wonderful: indeed, after my first tasting with Glantenay, some years ago, I was compelled to return a week later to verify that I hadn’t been imagining things, and that so serious a producer could really be so little known. That his wines sometimes take longer to bounce back after bottling than those of his peers, therefore, surprises me. Glantenay neither fines nor filters, but might the mobile bottling line he uses for the mise perhaps do a gentler job? In any case, the quality is not in doubt, and after the superb vintages of 2015 and 2016, 2017 is a worthy successor, in a lighter, more supple register, certainly, but with plenty of flavor and personality, and at last, available in normal quantities.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (01/19)

    In Stock

  • Bernard Moreau Chassagne-Montrachet 2018

    £64.99

    “The 2018 Chassagne-Montrachet Village had been blended in July and fined three weeks prior to my visit. It has a delightful bouquet of orange blossom, tinned peach and touches of wild mint, quite intense for a Village Cru. The palate is taut, fresh and spicy on the entry, with touches of white pepper and fennel infusing the citrus fruit. An almost clinical saline finish lingers in the mouth. Superb. Drink: 2021-2036. 90-92 points

    Readers will know the high esteem in which I hold Domaine Bernard Moreau and winemaker Alexandre Moreau. You want the best Chassagne-Montrachet? This is where you call first. I have absolutely no reason to alter that view with respect to the 2018s. “We started picking on 30 August, the same date as 2017 but the profile of the vintage is different,” Moreau told me surrounded by stainless steel vats. “This was because of the size of the crop and the heat. I like to have freshness and not too much alcohol, so I was anxious about the picking date. So I controlled the maturity, constantly tasting in the vineyard and soon realised that the sugar level can rise quicker than the phenolic maturity. I have now started the harvest in August in 2015, 2017 and 2018. I couldn’t understand why if August was so warm, the increase in sugar level was actually quite slow. I knew it was generous, but I did not know it would be so generous in older vineyards – something that I have never seen. For example, I haven’t made nine barrels of Chassagne Chenevottes since I began, then again, yields are only just above 50hl/ha for the Premier Crus. Maybe people are expecting something like 2003, but the 2018s are not heavy at all. For the Village and Premier Crus the alcohol is between 13.0° and 13.5°. As usual we practice natural fermentations, no racking and so forth – the only difference in 2018 is that it was a super-long alcoholic fermentation. Many barrels were fermenting until July – and I don’t mind that – I like to play this game as you have activity in the barrel with the fine lees in suspension and natural CO2 that protects your wine. The pH is around 3.19, which gives them a lot of freshness. It is not a vintage for early bottling and so most of the Premier Crus will be bottled next Spring.””

    Neal Martin, Vinous (01/20)

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  • Domaine de Belliviere Coteaux du Loir Vieilles Vignes Eparses 2017

    £48.95

    “Nicolas’s 2017 Coteaux du Loir Vieilles Vignes Eparses exhibits an intense yellow-golden color along with beautiful ripe and overripe mirabelle, honey, wax and white-chocolate aromas intertwined with discreet earthy and flinty notes. Silky and gentle on the seamless palate, with concentration, salt and finesse, this is a rich and intense, full-bodied yet elegant and finely mineral Chenin from vines up to 90 years old. The wine is concentrated and dry as well as fresh and sustainably salty and reveals some fine tannins. I’d cellar this 2017 for another couple of years, since it seems to be in a bit of a valley today. 12.5% alcohol. Tasted in May 2021. Drink: 2025-2035. 92+ points”

    Stephan Reinhardt, Wine Advocate (08/21)

    In Stock

  • Domaine du Monteillet Condrieu 2020

    £37.75

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Domaine Leflaive Bourgogne Blanc 2018

    £99.95

    “Notes of Anjou pear, white flowers and blanched almonds introduce Leflaive’s 2018 Bourgogne Blanc, a medium-bodied, supple and fleshy wine that’s open-knit and lively, revealing a demonstrative, giving profile that will make friends in its youth. Drink: 2021-2035. 88 points

    This year, I met with Brice de La Morandière and Pierre Vincent to taste not unfinished 2019s but rather the Domaine’s 2018s from bottle—a change in the estate’s policy that I warmly encourage and support—and I found the wines showing very well indeed. As I wrote last year, while many producers along the Côte de Beaune were inclined to accept the generous yields of the 2018 as nature’s gift, arguing that Chardonnay can sustain an elevated crop without suffering dilution, de La Morandière and Vincent opted to perform an aggressive green harvest, jettisoning around 40% of the potential crop. “I’m glad we have something to show for it,” remarked de La Morandière when I complimented the concentration of the domaine’s Combettes. As usual, the wines fermented and matured in barrel before finishing their élevage in stainless steel tanks on the lees, and they were bottled under Diam with some 25 parts per million free sulfur dioxide. As is the case in Chardonnay along the Côte de Beaune in the 2018 vintage, the appellation hierarchy does make itself felt—I tend to think that low yields efface some of the disadvantages of humbler sites, whereas large crops exaggerate them—but the highest appellation bottlings here are really quite serious; and, having evoked the comparison with Leflaive’s superb 1982 vintage when I tasted them from barrel last year, I continue to think that they will blossom beautifully with bottle age.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (01/21)

    In Stock

  • Domaine Tempier Bandol Blanc 2019

    £34.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Domaines Leflaive Macon-Ige 2019

    £37.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Domaines Leflaive Macon-Verze 2019

    £34.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Domaines Leflaive Macon-Verze Le Monte 2018

    £36.25

    “The Mâcon-Verzé Le Monté is a generous, inviting wine. Creamy and ample on the palate, the Monté reveals shades of tangerine oil, chamomile, marzipan and yellow flowers, all in an expansive style that has a ton to offer. Open-knit and fleshy, the 2018 shows a lot of immediacy. Drinking window: 2020-2026. 91 points”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (10/20)

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