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Showing 1–12 of 31 results

  • Bernard & Thierry Glantenay Puligny-Montrachet Premier Cru Les Folatieres 2017

    £79.99

    “Pretty and expressive, the 2017 Puligny-Montrachet 1er Cru Les Folatières offers up notes of crisp pear, ripe lemon and a touch of struck matchstick from its recent bottling, followed by a medium to full-bodied, satiny palate with tangy acids, nice chewy extract and a chalky finish. It’s one of the finest white wines I’ve tasted from Glantenay. Drink: 2019-2029. 93 points

    The disarmingly modest Thierry Glantenay is emerging as one of the Côte de Beaune’s most exciting producers of red wine. From his hillside winery overlooking the Marquis d’Angerville’s Clos des Ducs, Glantenay is producing a lovely range of elegant, pure and intense Volnays and Pommards that are increasingly consistent and stylistically assured. In the cuverie, he tells me, he is more and more content to let temperature and alcohol do the work of extraction for him, keeping pigéage and rémontage to a minimum; pressing is gentle; and élevage, without racking until the mise en bouteille, takes place in at most 30% new barrels. In the cellar, no matter which barrel you choose, the wines taste reliably wonderful: indeed, after my first tasting with Glantenay, some years ago, I was compelled to return a week later to verify that I hadn’t been imagining things, and that so serious a producer could really be so little known. That his wines sometimes take longer to bounce back after bottling than those of his peers, therefore, surprises me. Glantenay neither fines nor filters, but might the mobile bottling line he uses for the mise perhaps do a gentler job? In any case, the quality is not in doubt, and after the superb vintages of 2015 and 2016, 2017 is a worthy successor, in a lighter, more supple register, certainly, but with plenty of flavor and personality, and at last, available in normal quantities.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (01/19)

    In Stock

  • Bernard Moreau Chassagne-Montrachet 2018

    £64.99

    “The 2018 Chassagne-Montrachet Village had been blended in July and fined three weeks prior to my visit. It has a delightful bouquet of orange blossom, tinned peach and touches of wild mint, quite intense for a Village Cru. The palate is taut, fresh and spicy on the entry, with touches of white pepper and fennel infusing the citrus fruit. An almost clinical saline finish lingers in the mouth. Superb. Drink: 2021-2036. 90-92 points

    Readers will know the high esteem in which I hold Domaine Bernard Moreau and winemaker Alexandre Moreau. You want the best Chassagne-Montrachet? This is where you call first. I have absolutely no reason to alter that view with respect to the 2018s. “We started picking on 30 August, the same date as 2017 but the profile of the vintage is different,” Moreau told me surrounded by stainless steel vats. “This was because of the size of the crop and the heat. I like to have freshness and not too much alcohol, so I was anxious about the picking date. So I controlled the maturity, constantly tasting in the vineyard and soon realised that the sugar level can rise quicker than the phenolic maturity. I have now started the harvest in August in 2015, 2017 and 2018. I couldn’t understand why if August was so warm, the increase in sugar level was actually quite slow. I knew it was generous, but I did not know it would be so generous in older vineyards – something that I have never seen. For example, I haven’t made nine barrels of Chassagne Chenevottes since I began, then again, yields are only just above 50hl/ha for the Premier Crus. Maybe people are expecting something like 2003, but the 2018s are not heavy at all. For the Village and Premier Crus the alcohol is between 13.0° and 13.5°. As usual we practice natural fermentations, no racking and so forth – the only difference in 2018 is that it was a super-long alcoholic fermentation. Many barrels were fermenting until July – and I don’t mind that – I like to play this game as you have activity in the barrel with the fine lees in suspension and natural CO2 that protects your wine. The pH is around 3.19, which gives them a lot of freshness. It is not a vintage for early bottling and so most of the Premier Crus will be bottled next Spring.””

    Neal Martin, Vinous (01/20)

    In Stock

  • Domaine Leflaive Bourgogne Blanc 2018

    £99.95

    “Notes of Anjou pear, white flowers and blanched almonds introduce Leflaive’s 2018 Bourgogne Blanc, a medium-bodied, supple and fleshy wine that’s open-knit and lively, revealing a demonstrative, giving profile that will make friends in its youth. Drink: 2021-2035. 88 points

    This year, I met with Brice de La Morandière and Pierre Vincent to taste not unfinished 2019s but rather the Domaine’s 2018s from bottle—a change in the estate’s policy that I warmly encourage and support—and I found the wines showing very well indeed. As I wrote last year, while many producers along the Côte de Beaune were inclined to accept the generous yields of the 2018 as nature’s gift, arguing that Chardonnay can sustain an elevated crop without suffering dilution, de La Morandière and Vincent opted to perform an aggressive green harvest, jettisoning around 40% of the potential crop. “I’m glad we have something to show for it,” remarked de La Morandière when I complimented the concentration of the domaine’s Combettes. As usual, the wines fermented and matured in barrel before finishing their élevage in stainless steel tanks on the lees, and they were bottled under Diam with some 25 parts per million free sulfur dioxide. As is the case in Chardonnay along the Côte de Beaune in the 2018 vintage, the appellation hierarchy does make itself felt—I tend to think that low yields efface some of the disadvantages of humbler sites, whereas large crops exaggerate them—but the highest appellation bottlings here are really quite serious; and, having evoked the comparison with Leflaive’s superb 1982 vintage when I tasted them from barrel last year, I continue to think that they will blossom beautifully with bottle age.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (01/21)

    In Stock

  • Domaines Leflaive Macon-Ige 2019

    £37.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Domaines Leflaive Macon-Verze 2019

    £34.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Domaines Leflaive Macon-Verze Le Monte 2018

    £36.25

    “The Mâcon-Verzé Le Monté is a generous, inviting wine. Creamy and ample on the palate, the Monté reveals shades of tangerine oil, chamomile, marzipan and yellow flowers, all in an expansive style that has a ton to offer. Open-knit and fleshy, the 2018 shows a lot of immediacy. Drinking window: 2020-2026. 91 points”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (10/20)

    In Stock

  • Domaines Leflaive Macon-Verze Les Chenes 2018

    £35.99

    “The 2018 Mâcon-Verzé Les Chenes is airy and gracious in the glass. Ripe pear, apricot, jasmine and passionfruit give the 2018 an exotic, floral feel that is impossible to miss. On the palate, the Chenes is airy and nicely lifted, not to mention super appealing. This is such a refined Burgundy. Drinking window: 2020-2026. 90 points”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (10/20)

    In Stock

  • Julien Guillot Macon Cruzille Aragonite 2019

    £44.99

    “In a sense, a visit to Julien Guillot’s Domaine des Vignes du Maynes is like stepping back in time. Farmed organically since the Second World War, these vineyards have never seen pesticides or herbicides. The Guillot family also never planted clonal selections of Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Gamay, preferring to keep the lower-yielding local selections that have since died out elsewhere. Even the estate’s cellars are constructed on the ruins of a Roman villa. Yet for all the weight of history here, Domaine des Vignes du Maynes is also decidedly innovative. Guillot is a pioneer of biodynamics in Southern Burgundy: when he made the shift in 1998, his neighbors referred to his endeavors as “les conneries de Guillot”—”Guillot’s bullshit.” He vinifies with little or no sulfur dioxide. And he’s a darling of the so-called natural wine movement, his wines coveted by Parisian cavistes and East Coast sommeliers alike. They merit all the attention, because Guillot is far from a follower of fashion; wander through the vineyards of Cruzille in springtime, and the chances are you’ll run into him on a tractor. Complex and textural, the whites are exotic examples of white Burgundy that will surprise anyone habituated to aseptic commercial Mâcon. And the reds are superb—satiny and perfumed expressions of Pinot Noir and Gamay that disappear dangerously rapidly. This is an iconic estate in the Mâconnais, and readers shouldn’t hesitate to experience these singular wines for themselves.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (249)

    In Stock

  • Julien Guillot Macon Cruzille Blanc Au Quin Chateau 2019

    £32.95

    “In a sense, a visit to Julien Guillot’s Domaine des Vignes du Maynes is like stepping back in time. Farmed organically since the Second World War, these vineyards have never seen pesticides or herbicides. The Guillot family also never planted clonal selections of Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Gamay, preferring to keep the lower-yielding local selections that have since died out elsewhere. Even the estate’s cellars are constructed on the ruins of a Roman villa. Yet for all the weight of history here, Domaine des Vignes du Maynes is also decidedly innovative. Guillot is a pioneer of biodynamics in Southern Burgundy: when he made the shift in 1998, his neighbors referred to his endeavors as “les conneries de Guillot”—”Guillot’s bullshit.” He vinifies with little or no sulfur dioxide. And he’s a darling of the so-called natural wine movement, his wines coveted by Parisian cavistes and East Coast sommeliers alike. They merit all the attention, because Guillot is far from a follower of fashion; wander through the vineyards of Cruzille in springtime, and the chances are you’ll run into him on a tractor. Complex and textural, the whites are exotic examples of white Burgundy that will surprise anyone habituated to aseptic commercial Mâcon. And the reds are superb—satiny and perfumed expressions of Pinot Noir and Gamay that disappear dangerously rapidly. This is an iconic estate in the Mâconnais, and readers shouldn’t hesitate to experience these singular wines for themselves.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (249)

    In Stock

  • Marc Colin Chassagne-Montrachet Margot 2019

    £59.99

    “The 2019 Chassagne-Montrachet Village “Margot”, the name of this particular cuvée rather than the lieu-dit, comes from four parcels and is raised in 15% new oak. It has a well defined bouquet with orange pith and yellow plum aromas that gain intensity with aeration. The palate is full of energy with impressive depth, gorgeous orange zest and mandarin notes, almond and a little walnut. Very harmonious and very persistent on the finish, this punches well above its weight. Drinking window: 2022-2036. 91-93 points

    Since splitting with his brother Joseph, whose wines will hopefully be added to this report in the not-too-distant future, winemaker Damien Colin, together with his sister Caroline, has continued to create some of the best Burgundy wines you will find in Saint-Aubin, Chassagne and Puligny-Montrachet, from his winery based in the confusingly-titled village of Gamay. “It is a complicated growing season with the frost and the ‘canicule’ [heat wave]. In some appellations we produced just 30% of a normal crop in 2019, though there are others that produced a normal yield.” Damien Colin added that in Saint-Aubin, parcels located on the slopes that normally escape frost, were affected in 2019. Vines on flatter areas that are prone to frost damage seemed to escape Scot-free. He continued saying that in Saint-Aubin, buds had already begun opening, allowing moisture to enter, causing some of them to ‘explode’ when it turned to ice.

    “Flowering was normal and then there was a heatwave in the summer, but the vines did not suffer much hydric stress despite the high temperatures that reached around 40°C. The harvest was small, so the maturity came very quickly. The vintage was expected to be 15 September but by the end of August the natural alcohol was around 12.0° to 12.5°. Therefore, we brought the picking forward and began on 7 September until 18-19 September. For the whites the alcohol degree is 13.5° to 14.0°C but with high acidity, mainly tartaric. The malic was low so after the malolactic fermentation the acidity levels are still good. The harvest was rapid because of the small yields, though we had to keep stopping and starting to be precise in terms of picking. The fermentation was quite quick, finishing around mid-November and the malos passed normally in springtime. From 2019 we no longer use SO2 until after the malolactic, which was fine in 2019 as the fruit was healthy. The SO2 inhibits some of the natural yeasts and without SO2 we have a broad spectrum of yeasts that engender more complex wine. The Village Crus are matured in around 15% new oak and the Premier Crus between 20% and 25% new oak. The 2019s are all taken from vat and will be bottled next spring with the final six months in tank.”

    The 2019s from Domaine Marc Colin do not disappoint and it is remarkable, almost irrational that such freshness could be conjured in such a dry and warm season. Standout? Perhaps surprising to some, it is not their morsel of Montrachet, good as that is, but a thrilling Bâtard-Montrachet, a Grand Cru that I feel over-performs in this vintage. If unable to splash the cash, then head for their outstanding Saint-Aubin Les Charmois or Les Combes or just buy both. I also found much to admire apropos their nervy Chassagne-Montrachets, particularly in Les Vides Bourses. Not every cuvée hit the bulls-eye, but generally these 2019s continue to consolidate Damien Colin’s reputation as winemaker par excellence. Pressing him to choose between 2018 and 2019 he replies: “It is difficult for me to say one vintage is better than the other. I find more terroir character in 2019 and I think that they will need more time.””

    Neal Martin, Vinous (12/20)

    In Stock

  • Marc Colin Chassagne-Montrachet Premier Cru Les Caillerets 2019

    £119.75

    Three bottles available

    “The 2019 Chassagne-Montrachet 1er Cru Les Caillerets is very promising, opening in the glass with notes of pear, fresh peach, white flowers, beeswax and pastry cream. Medium to full-bodied, layered and concentrated, with terrific structuring dry extract, lively acids and a long, mineral finish, it’s once again one of the highlights of the portfolio. 93-95 points

    Damien Colin reported that his yields were some 30% below average and that the crop ripened rapidly, “even very rapidly.” Indeed, having projected a September 15 start, he began picking on September 7. Alcohol levels came in for the most part between 13% and 13.5%, with good phenolic maturity and lower pHs than in 2018. Having learned from a succession of warm vintages, every effort was made to retain freshness: working with cool grapes, minimal bâtonnage and moderate percentages of new oak. And in the vineyards, Colin is backing off rognage, working more flexibly to adapt to the vintage. All this translates to a very fine vintage chez Colin, delivering wines that are more concentrated and more clearly defined by site than the charming, open and expressive 2018s, also revisited here.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (01/21)

     

    In Stock

  • Valette Macon-Chaintre Vieilles Vignes 2017

    £34.99

    “After years of trying, it was with great interest that I at last paid a visit to Philippe Valette’s elusive 8.5-hectare Chaintré estate. The Valette family were the first to exit the local cooperative, and they rapidly won a reputation for rich, concentrated wines that were frequently celebrated in the pages of this publication. On leaving school in 1990, Philippe began to convert the domaine to organic farming, and since 1992, their wines have never been chaptalized. Influenced by a meeting with Pierre Overnoy, Valette has come to identify with the natural wine movement, and today, his wines see little or no sulfur and increasingly long élevage—indeed, the 2006 Clos de Monsieur Noly spent fully 12 years in barrel. If the estate’s wines through the late 1990s were simply powerful, textural examples of high-quality white Burgundy (notes on several will appear in the next installment of Up From the Cellar), the wines being released today belong in a category of their own. Complex and sapid, I find them fascinating, but readers should be prepared to find wines that are quite different from any of the Valettes’ neighbors. Anyone who appreciates the Jura bottlings of Jean-François Ganevat or the Thomas Pico Chablis wines is likely to love them! My experience is that they often benefit from extended aeration, and I tend to decant Valette’s wines or follow them over several days.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (244)

    In Stock