Showing 1–12 of 17 results

  • Achaval Ferrer Finca Altamira Malbec 2015

    £85.25

    “(14.3% alcohol; from vines on alluvial soil): Bright, full ruby-red. Some exotic coffee and mocha oak notes complement aromas of blackberry, blueberry, plum and minerals; at once a bit liqueur-like and slightly reduced. Ripe, plush, utterly seamless wine with a restrained sweetness and superb breadth to its dark berry, nutty oak, herb and spice flavors. Finishes very long and youthfully tight, with suave tannins, an element of medicinal reserve, and lively notes of spices and flowers. The least fruity and most soil-driven of these single-vineyard wines in 2015, and built for a slow evolution in bottle. Drinking window: 2020-2029. 93+ points”

    Stephen Tanzer, Vinous (07/18)

    In Stock

  • Achaval Ferrer Finca Bella Vista 2015

    £85.25

    “(14.5% alcohol; from a deep gravel bed near the Mendoza River): Bright, moderately saturated medium ruby. Aromas of cassis, redcurrant, spices, herbs and tobacco along with an element of chocolatey oak. Wonderfully fine-grained, lively and sweet; both darker and brighter in its flavor profile than the Finca Altamira but also more open-knit today, showing a strong element of spicy oak. Finishes smooth, broad and sweet, but is it as complex? A second bottle of equal breadth was a bit more sharply focused and floral, and finished with a serious tannic spine and sneaky building persistence. This Malbec needs time. Drinking window: 2020-2027. 92+ points”

    Stephen Tanzer, Vinous (07/18)

    In Stock

  • Achaval Ferrer Finca Mirador Malbec 2015

    £82.25

    “(14.8% alcohol; from heavier soils): Bright medium ruby. Pungent, medicinal aromas of blueberry, blackberry, espresso and mint complicated by mineral and leather nuances. Plush, rich and deep, communicating an almost chocolatey ripeness to its slightly medicinal flavors of dark berries and leather. The most massive of these single-vineyard wines and also the mostly obviously alcoholic in its slight warmth. Boasts excellent breadth and well-buffered tannins but can’t quite match the Altamira or Bella Vista for class or inner-mouth energy. This large-scaled, slightly wild wine has plenty of tannins for cellaring. Drinking window: 2020-2027. 91+ points”

    Stephen Tanzer, Vinous (07/18)

    In Stock

  • Achaval Ferrer Quimera 2016

    £35.95

    “Dark medium ruby. Aromas of cassis, licorice, violet, bitter chocolate and spicy oak. Suave, energetic and light on its feet, offering lovely breadth and definition to its dark berry and mineral flavors; a slight herbal element (a touch of peppery stems?) adds complexity without coming off as vegetal. This savory, classically dry blend finishes with well-integrated tannins and sneaky rising length. A very successful, sophisticated wine from this cool year. Drinking window: 2020-2028. 91 points”

    Stephen Tanzer, Vinous (09/19)

    In Stock

  • Altos Las Hormigas Appellation Gualtallary Malbec 2018

    £39.99

    “The site-specific 2018 Malbec Appellation Gualtallary comes from specific soils, two plots that they believe transmit the maximum expression of limestone to Malbec, giving a structured wine with fine-grained tannins but a little wild. The vines are on stony and gravelly soils with a high percentage of limestone and sand with around 3% clay at 1,300 meters in altitude. The grapes fermented in small concrete vats with indigenous yeasts at some 25 degrees Celsius for 15 days. It matured in untoasted 3,500-liter French oak foudres for 18 months and no less than 12 months in bottle. This comes from sandy soils and very low yields that give it chalkier tannins and a savage way. This has a slightly rustic touch, vertical and with some lightness. There’s always a fresh touch of aromatic herbs (thyme and rockrose), with a textured palate and very tasty and clean flavors in the finish. 20,600 bottles were filled in September 2019. Drink: 2021-2030. 97 points

    Altos Las Hormigas is the Italian-Chilean project of Antonio Morescalchi, Alberto Antonini, Attilio Pagli, Pedro Parra, Albert Cussen, Pedro Donoso and Patricio Bustamante in the heart of Mendoza, initially in Luján de Cuyo where they have the winery and 211 hectares of land where they planted 47 hectares of Malbec between 1996 and 2012 and a further six hectares of Bonarda planted in 2007. They later planted 54 hectares in Altamira in Valle de Uco, mostly Malbec with some Bonarda and Semillon to keep the biodiversity, following what they learn from Alan York and Gianfranco Soldera. They harvested the first grapes from Jardín de Altamira in 2020. Their vineyards are certified organic, but they also source grapes from other growers to produce around 800,000 bottles per year. They have also changed their resident winemaker, as Leo Erazo went back to Chile to focus on his own personal project. So, for the 2020 harvest, they hired a young Argentinean winemaker called Federico Gambetta.”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (03/21)

    In Stock

  • Altos Las Hormigas Paraje Altamira Malbec 2017

    £38.99

    “The captivating 2017 Malbec Appellation Altamira has been produced with grapes from the same vineyard since 2015, next to the neighboring vineyard where they have now planted their own grapes. It’s tremendously expressive and aromatic, and it seems to transcend the vintage. They couldn’t make the wine in 2016 because of the adverse conditions, but they came back really strong with this 2017, which has a chalky texture and a dry, austere and long finish. Really very good. Drink: 2019-2027. 95 points

    I visited the impressive new vineyard from Altos Las Hormigas in Altamira with winemaker Leo Erazo, where they have planted by soil and kept the local vegetation rather than planting rectangular plots. That will make it easier to work by soil when the vines come into production.”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (245)

    In Stock

  • Colome Altura Maxima Malbec 2016

    £89.99

    “The ripe 2016 Altura Máxima Malbec seems to follow the path of the 2015, with pungent aromas of black olives, damp earth, decayed violets and malted cereals that give it a decadent profile. This hits the scale at 15% alcohol, but the palate feels a lot lighter, with a strong strike of acidity going through its core and lifting it up. This is a unique wine from grapes grown at 3,100 meters in altitude (yes, you read it correctly, that’s 3,100 meters in altitude!) where the intensity of the light makes for thick skins and an explosion of flavors and aromas. The tannins are really fine and polished and give it a nice texture. It’s clean and long and feels light but with lots of inner strength. A unique Malbec. 8,400 bottles were filled in August 2018. Drink: 2019-2026. 95 points

    They have planted a further 1.5 hectares of Malbec in their Altura Máxima vineyard. And it seems like winemaker Thibaut Delmotte is back…”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (245)

    In Stock

  • Colome Altura Maxima Sauvignon Blanc 2018

    £29.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Pulenta Estate Gran Corte 2018

    £33.25

    “Pulenta Estate is a winery owned by brothers Eduardo and Hugo Pulenta, Mendoza businessmen who have a long history in wine production: the family sold the Peñaflor winery in the 1990s. Today, led by Eduardo and Diego Pulenta (the fourth generation), they use grapes from their vineyards in Los Árboles and Agrelo to produce wines in both traditional and modern styles under oenologist Javier Lo Forte.”

    Joaquin Hildago, Vinous (10/20)

    In Stock

  • Pulenta Gran Cabernet Franc 2018

    £31.75

    “The 2018 Gran Cabernet Franc from Agrelo, Luján de Cuyo was fermented in 20% new barrels and then aged in the same vessels for 12 months. A vivid garnet red, the aromas feature ash and herbs with hints of roasted red pepper over bold notes from the aging process and a whiff of redcurrant. Broad and terse with a delicate texture even at its most intense, the polished tannins and precise freshness keep the levels ratcheted up before the lengthy finish. Drinking window: 2021-2033. 92 points”

    Joaquin Hildago, Vinous (11/21)

    In Stock

  • Pulenta Gran Malbec 2018

    £31.75

    “The 2018 Gran Malbec from Los Árboles, Uco Valley was aged for 12 months in 10% new French barrels. A dense purple in the glass, the nose offers notes of plum, violet, country herbs and sour cherry against a backdrop of sweet spices and other woody aromas. Indulgent initially, it’s juicy and fleshy in the mouth, gaining in freshness and fruity flavor as the channeled flow progresses. Long-lasting with a bold finish, fresh plum aromas linger at the back of the throat. A delicious wine. Drinking window: 2021-2038. 94 points”

    Joaquin Hildago, Vinous (11/21)

    In Stock

  • Zuccardi Aluvional Gualtallary Malbec 2016

    £64.99

    “The 2016 Aluvional Gualtallary is a textbook example of the wild character of the place in a cold vintage. This comes from the subzone close to the monastery, a higher-altitude place (1,350 to 1,450 meters) with the influence of the Jaboncillo slopes and the caliche (a kind of limestone) in the soils. 2016 is a great example of how to tame the wilderness of the place, which, in the cooler year, means contained ripeness and superb texture. 2016 has to be the finest vintage for Gualtallary. 10,300 bottles were filled in February 2017. Drink: 2019-2032. 97 points

    Zuccardi keeps working the origin of their wines, aiming to show the place in their wines while looking for balance. They’re also simplifying things, doing less in the winery and more in the vineyards.

    I tasted 2016, a cool and wet year when they learned a lot: the wines have less alcohol and are better in the Valle de Uco than in the classical zone of Mendoza. For Zuccardi, it might be their finest vintage to date, where the top of the range really excels; the Finca Piedra Infinita really blew me away. 2017 was warmer and, together with 2016, very low yielding. 2018 was cooler than 2017; the wines are fresher, and it’s a more homogeneous year. Most people talk about a classical Mendoza vintage. I didn’t taste anything from the 2019 vintage, which was dry and cool (with temperatures almost as cold as 2016)—something unusual, as the vintages tend to be warm and dry or cold and wet. So, let’s wait for the 2019s, but in the meantime, there are some exceptional wines in the current offering.”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (245)

    In Stock