Showing 1–12 of 19 results

  • Bussaco Palace Hotel Reservado Blanco 2016

    £55.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Bussaco Palace Hotel Reservado Tinto 2015

    £57.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Casa Ferreirinha Quinta da Leda 2017

    £41.99

    “45% Touriga Franca, 30% Touriga Nacional, 15% Tinto Cão, 10% Tinta Roriz. 2017 was a particularly warm and dry year in the Douro, with the maximum, median and minimum temperatures all around 5 °C higher than average. Rainfall was also approximately 50% lower than usual. As a result of the warm and dry conditions, the grapes ripened at a faster pace than usual and the harvest began on 22 August for the red varieties, one of the earliest harvest dates on record. TA 5.3 g/l, RS 0.8 g/l, pH 3.7.

    In this hot, dry year, they used more fruit from the cooler sites (higher or north-facing) as well as picking earlier. Very dark with black core. Back to riper black fruits of plums and damsons in this warmer, drier year. Sweet and slightly leathery on the nose but that eucalyptus character comes out with time in the glass. On the palate, lots of chewy grip but not in the least astringent. Polished but present tannins and avoids the overripeness of many of the 2017s I have tasted so it keeps its dark, rocky Douro character. Surprisingly savoury and dark, with dark chocolate on the finish. Oak well integrated. Drink: 2023-2030. 16.5+ points”

    Julia Harding, JancisRobinson.com (04/21)

    In Stock

  • Casa Ferreirinha Reserva Especial 2009

    £129.99

    “The 2009 Reserva Especial is mostly a 45/30 blend of Touriga Franca and Touriga Nacional, with 15% Tinta Roriz and 10% Tinto Cão, aged for 16 months in 75% new French oak. It comes in at 14.5% alcohol. Very muscular, this has all the warmth of this difficult and very hot vintage. The fruit marches right up to the line of too ripe and perhaps goes over it. The wine shows dark baked-plum flavors and just a hint of prune. I liked it anyway, but it is hard to call it a great Reserva Especial, even with some elements of greatness to it. The structure here is astonishingly good, for one thing, leaving this tight and powerful. That’s not unusual for this big vintage or the brand. However, it simply lacks the balance of the other wines. Personally, I’d take the 2009 Quinta da Leda (not seen for this issue) or the 2015. They may not be as attention-getting, but they are far fresher, particularly the 2015. Some may be happier with this, to be sure, others probably not. Let’s start here and see if this holds its balance as it ages. A little caution is warranted. It may yet make its case in the cellar, and these tend to age very well—although (beware…) this is not the freshest year. There were 1,500 cases produced. Drink: 2019-2040. 93+ points”

    Mark Squires, Wine Advocate (238)

    In Stock

  • Casa Ferreirinha Tinta Francisca 2014

    £69.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Luis Seabra Xisto Cru Branco 2017

    £36.99

    “The 2017 Branco “Xisto Cru” is 70% Rabigato with Códega, Gouveio and Viosinho principally filling out the rest. It was aged for 12 months in used French oak and comes in at 12.7% alcohol. It was sourced from the Mêda region at the southern border of Douro Superior with vines over 80 years old at 650 to 700 meters in altitude. There’s a bit of wood showing here, but it fades easily as the wine sits. Relatively fleshy despite the low alcohol, this is beautifully balanced, the freshness always supporting the fruit. Harmonious and subtly concentrated, it should age well. How well it develops is another question. Let’s start here now. This does need to show the ability to develop and become more complex with age. There were 4,690 bottles and 120 magnums produced. Drink: 2017-2028. 91+ points”

    Mark Squires, Wine Advocate (244)

    In Stock

  • Niepoort Batuta 2015

    £62.99

    “The 2015 Batuta is a field blend from old vines, with lots of Touriga Franca, Tinta Roriz, Rufete and others, aged in 20% new French barriques for 20 months. It comes in at just 12.5% alcohol. This may be my favorite Batuta in a long time. Now, this is always an elegantly crafted wine, always understated (often, to a fault). This year, though, it has a particularly nice combination of freshness, grip and ripe tannins that make it very appealing. Then, it adds that gorgeous intensity of fruit flavor that this vintage produced, perfectly supported and defined by the acidity that slams the fruit into the palate. There is also very respectable weight (relative to this usually understated bottling and the elegant vintage). It then finishes tight and grabs the palate. Overall, this deserves some props and plenty of them. It should age beautifully. It is also a vintage that is approachable young, but it will certainly be better in 2020 or so, assuming you can keep your hands off of it. It is very tasty now, if a bit tight. We’ll see what the future brings, but I have to lean up on this beauty right now. This was not bottled when seen, but it was a tank sample, out of barrel and the final blend. Drink: 2018-2045. 94-96 points

    Part of this new issue is assessing the new 2016 Branco vintage. In terms of whites, Niepoort said he was not sure which he preferred, leaning to the 2016s, but he preferred 2015 in both reds and ports. (Granting that everyone’s terroir is different and different picking decisions may color views, too, I lean to the 2015s overall.) Although many of these were not yet bottled, it looks to me like 2015 is one of Niepoort’s best vintages in Tintos. The Ports weren’t too shabby, either—those are separately reviewed this issue. They are among the stars of the vintage.

    This issue also includes wines from many of Niepoort’s terroirs—he is rapidly spreading through Portugal and popping up everywhere. To my mind, his Bairrada project just might be the best segment of his table wines these days (separately listed as Quinta de Baixo), assuming you like that low-alcohol, tannic and crisp style (nothing fat and sweet there). Increasingly, incidentally, Niepoort is releasing the wines a year later and holding them a bit longer in tank or bottle to make the wines more age-worthy and a little more austere, essentially calming the fruit.”

    Mark Squires, Wine Advocate (232)

    In Stock

  • Niepoort Bioma Vinha Velha Vintage Port 2016

    £77.95

    “The 2016 Bioma Vinha Velha Vintage Port is not set to be bottled for several months, which is a little too far in the future by my normal protocols. It is the final blend, though, and it is worth sneaking this beauty into the 2016 report this issue. This single-plot Porto is a worthy competitor to the fine Ports in this vintage and to the 2015 Bioma (Niepoort did not declare his normal blended Vintage Port in 2016). Deep, very concentrated and powerful, this is chock-full of brilliant fruit and flavor. It’s intense, rich, delicious and superb. This will be released in the spring of 2019, lagging behind most of the 2016s. It will be worth the wait. P.S. I had a quick look at the 2017. It’s a long way from being ready, admittedly, but it may well be even better. We will have fun arguing over the 2015, 2016 and 2017 as the years march on. Drink: 2027-2070. 95-97 points

    Niepoort in 2016 only made Bioma and did not make his typical blend. Look for his 2017s. Regarding the tawnies, remember that the drinking windows are just placeholders. Tawnies age well. The longer they are in barrel, the better they age. As long as the cork does not fail, they may hold more or less indefinitely, which is hard to predict. I add a little extra time as they get older, but it’s just a tip to illustrate the category. It is not exactly precise. The beauty of end-date drinking windows for Port, of course, is that no one can yell at me if I’m wrong.”

    Mark Squires, Wine Advocate (07/18)

    In Stock

  • Niepoort Coche 2017

    £69.99

    “Rabigato, Viosinho and Côdega do Larinho, average age > 80 years, on mica schist. Spontaneous fermentation, malo and one year in 300- and 500-litre barrels. pH 3.16, TA 6 g/l.

    As the name predicts, this has a definite but not excessive reductive character, more smoky-mineral than struck match. Fabulous depth of fruit, rounded, generous texture and still showing utter purity and freshness. The reductive character is perfectly judged, not overwhelming the fruit and enhancing the mineral character. Mouth-wateringly long and salty finish. Just makes you want to take the next sip. Glorious. I didn’t taste the the 2016 but I think this is even better than the 2015. Hats off to the Niepoort team. It might seem a crime to drink it so young when it is likely to gain in complexity but it is already delicious. Drink: 2020-2030. 18.5 points”

    Julia Harding, JancisRobinson.com (04/20)

    In Stock

  • Niepoort Redoma Branco Reserva 2016

    £35.99

    “The 2015 Redoma Reserva Branco is a field blend from old vines that were aged for nine months in 30% new French oak (the remaining barrels of varying ages). It comes in at 12.5% alcohol. This adds a couple of layers of depth to the regular Redoma Branco, more power and, of course, more oak. However, this will have a long aging curve and it should easily pull it in. In fact, it is becoming well integrated even now. Underneath, you get fine acidity and it drinks beautifully, but it will acquire more complexity and harmony in a few years. This, unlike the regular Redoma, really needs food. Don’t treat it as a porch-sipper and don’t drink it too cold. Drink: 2017-2033. 94 points

    Part of this new issue is assessing the new 2016 Branco vintage. In terms of whites, Niepoort said he was not sure which he preferred, leaning to the 2016s, but he preferred 2015 in both reds and ports. (Granting that everyone’s terroir is different and different picking decisions may color views, too, I lean to the 2015s overall.) Although many of these were not yet bottled, it looks to me like 2015 is one of Niepoort’s best vintages in Tintos. The Ports weren’t too shabby, either—those are separately reviewed this issue. They are among the stars of the vintage.

    This issue also includes wines from many of Niepoort’s terroirs—he is rapidly spreading through Portugal and popping up everywhere. To my mind, his Bairrada project just might be the best segment of his table wines these days (separately listed as Quinta de Baixo), assuming you like that low-alcohol, tannic and crisp style (nothing fat and sweet there). Increasingly, incidentally, Niepoort is releasing the wines a year later and holding them a bit longer in tank or bottle to make the wines more age-worthy and a little more austere, essentially calming the fruit.”

    Mark Squires, Wine Advocate (232)

    In Stock

  • Niepoort Redoma Tinto 2014

    £39.99

    “The 2014 Redoma, Niepoort’s field blend from old vines, is one of my favorite Douro blends, but it seems to fall a bit short in this tough vintage. Light and a little too easy, its best feature is the vivid fruit flavor. Not many 2014s can say that. All too many of them are dry, stern and stolid. This, at least, tastes great. It does seem a bit off its normal mark otherwise, not showing enough concentration. The structure is just average. Its fresh and lively feel still makes it a pleasure to drink, though. It won’t go down as a great Redoma, but it is certainly a pleasing one in a tough year and a perfect food wine. Drink: 2017-2027. 90 points

    Yes, Niepoort Vinho Verde is here. It’s old news, actually. Dirk, these days, has a footprint in many regions, but it’s worth spotlighting his Vinho Verde output since this issue (April 2017) marks the debut of the new Vinho Verde season. (These are, however, late-submitted 2015s, not 2016s.) I really like his efforts in Vinho Verde. They are often among my favorites in his output, not having quite as much grandeur as some of his other labels, but always showing fine quality and value for the money. The rest aren’t so bad, either. In particular, this issue includes Dão, Douro and Bairrada (that last separately listed under Quinta de Baixo). Pricing on these wines could not be finalized before these notes were submitted, but pricing on existing brands already in the database shouldn’t vary too much.”

    Mark Squires, Wine Advocate (230)

    In Stock

  • Niepoort Robustus 2013

    £79.99

    “The 2013 Robustus is a field blend with unusual vinification (as always for this brand). It was aged for 45 months in old, 2,000-liter wooden vats and comes in at just 12.7% alcohol. This may be Niepoort’s blockbuster this issue, but in Niepoort’s style, that mostly means freshness, acidity and tannins, not big, sweet fruit and jammy ripeness. Intense and focused, this very precise Robustus is a powerhouse with a crisp, steely edge and intensity of everything. This is a Robustus that seems to be on its way to spectacular. When this is released (October 2017), it is going to need some patience. It should hold several decades thereafter. There will be no rush. This was not bottled when seen, but it was a tank sample, out of barrel and the final blend. Drink: 2020-2048. 94-96 points

    Part of this new issue is assessing the new 2016 Branco vintage. In terms of whites, Niepoort said he was not sure which he preferred, leaning to the 2016s, but he preferred 2015 in both reds and ports. (Granting that everyone’s terroir is different and different picking decisions may color views, too, I lean to the 2015s overall.) Although many of these were not yet bottled, it looks to me like 2015 is one of Niepoort’s best vintages in Tintos. The Ports weren’t too shabby, either—those are separately reviewed this issue. They are among the stars of the vintage.

    This issue also includes wines from many of Niepoort’s terroirs—he is rapidly spreading through Portugal and popping up everywhere. To my mind, his Bairrada project just might be the best segment of his table wines these days (separately listed as Quinta de Baixo), assuming you like that low-alcohol, tannic and crisp style (nothing fat and sweet there). Increasingly, incidentally, Niepoort is releasing the wines a year later and holding them a bit longer in tank or bottle to make the wines more age-worthy and a little more austere, essentially calming the fruit.”

    Mark Squires, Wine Advocate (232)

    In Stock