Showing 1–12 of 43 results

  • Bernard & Thierry Glantenay Puligny-Montrachet Premier Cru Les Folatieres 2017

    £79.99

    “Pretty and expressive, the 2017 Puligny-Montrachet 1er Cru Les Folatières offers up notes of crisp pear, ripe lemon and a touch of struck matchstick from its recent bottling, followed by a medium to full-bodied, satiny palate with tangy acids, nice chewy extract and a chalky finish. It’s one of the finest white wines I’ve tasted from Glantenay. Drink: 2019-2029. 93 points

    The disarmingly modest Thierry Glantenay is emerging as one of the Côte de Beaune’s most exciting producers of red wine. From his hillside winery overlooking the Marquis d’Angerville’s Clos des Ducs, Glantenay is producing a lovely range of elegant, pure and intense Volnays and Pommards that are increasingly consistent and stylistically assured. In the cuverie, he tells me, he is more and more content to let temperature and alcohol do the work of extraction for him, keeping pigéage and rémontage to a minimum; pressing is gentle; and élevage, without racking until the mise en bouteille, takes place in at most 30% new barrels. In the cellar, no matter which barrel you choose, the wines taste reliably wonderful: indeed, after my first tasting with Glantenay, some years ago, I was compelled to return a week later to verify that I hadn’t been imagining things, and that so serious a producer could really be so little known. That his wines sometimes take longer to bounce back after bottling than those of his peers, therefore, surprises me. Glantenay neither fines nor filters, but might the mobile bottling line he uses for the mise perhaps do a gentler job? In any case, the quality is not in doubt, and after the superb vintages of 2015 and 2016, 2017 is a worthy successor, in a lighter, more supple register, certainly, but with plenty of flavor and personality, and at last, available in normal quantities.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (01/19)

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  • Bernard Moreau Chassagne-Montrachet 2018

    £47.99

    “The 2018 Chassagne-Montrachet Village had been blended in July and fined three weeks prior to my visit. It has a delightful bouquet of orange blossom, tinned peach and touches of wild mint, quite intense for a Village Cru. The palate is taut, fresh and spicy on the entry, with touches of white pepper and fennel infusing the citrus fruit. An almost clinical saline finish lingers in the mouth. Superb. Drink: 2021-2036. 90-92 points

    Readers will know the high esteem in which I hold Domaine Bernard Moreau and winemaker Alexandre Moreau. You want the best Chassagne-Montrachet? This is where you call first. I have absolutely no reason to alter that view with respect to the 2018s. “We started picking on 30 August, the same date as 2017 but the profile of the vintage is different,” Moreau told me surrounded by stainless steel vats. “This was because of the size of the crop and the heat. I like to have freshness and not too much alcohol, so I was anxious about the picking date. So I controlled the maturity, constantly tasting in the vineyard and soon realised that the sugar level can rise quicker than the phenolic maturity. I have now started the harvest in August in 2015, 2017 and 2018. I couldn’t understand why if August was so warm, the increase in sugar level was actually quite slow. I knew it was generous, but I did not know it would be so generous in older vineyards – something that I have never seen. For example, I haven’t made nine barrels of Chassagne Chenevottes since I began, then again, yields are only just above 50hl/ha for the Premier Crus. Maybe people are expecting something like 2003, but the 2018s are not heavy at all. For the Village and Premier Crus the alcohol is between 13.0° and 13.5°. As usual we practice natural fermentations, no racking and so forth – the only difference in 2018 is that it was a super-long alcoholic fermentation. Many barrels were fermenting until July – and I don’t mind that – I like to play this game as you have activity in the barrel with the fine lees in suspension and natural CO2 that protects your wine. The pH is around 3.19, which gives them a lot of freshness. It is not a vintage for early bottling and so most of the Premier Crus will be bottled next Spring.””

    Neal Martin, Vinous (01/20)

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  • Domaine Leflaive Bourgogne Blanc 2018

    £56.95

    “Notes of Anjou pear, white flowers and blanched almonds introduce Leflaive’s 2018 Bourgogne Blanc, a medium-bodied, supple and fleshy wine that’s open-knit and lively, revealing a demonstrative, giving profile that will make friends in its youth. Drink: 2021-2035. 88 points

    This year, I met with Brice de La Morandière and Pierre Vincent to taste not unfinished 2019s but rather the Domaine’s 2018s from bottle—a change in the estate’s policy that I warmly encourage and support—and I found the wines showing very well indeed. As I wrote last year, while many producers along the Côte de Beaune were inclined to accept the generous yields of the 2018 as nature’s gift, arguing that Chardonnay can sustain an elevated crop without suffering dilution, de La Morandière and Vincent opted to perform an aggressive green harvest, jettisoning around 40% of the potential crop. “I’m glad we have something to show for it,” remarked de La Morandière when I complimented the concentration of the domaine’s Combettes. As usual, the wines fermented and matured in barrel before finishing their élevage in stainless steel tanks on the lees, and they were bottled under Diam with some 25 parts per million free sulfur dioxide. As is the case in Chardonnay along the Côte de Beaune in the 2018 vintage, the appellation hierarchy does make itself felt—I tend to think that low yields efface some of the disadvantages of humbler sites, whereas large crops exaggerate them—but the highest appellation bottlings here are really quite serious; and, having evoked the comparison with Leflaive’s superb 1982 vintage when I tasted them from barrel last year, I continue to think that they will blossom beautifully with bottle age.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (01/21)

    In Stock

  • Domaines Leflaive Macon-Ige 2018

    £29.95

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Domaines Leflaive Macon-Verze 2018

    £34.99

    “The 2018 Mâcon-Verzé is bright and nicely focused. Light tropical overtones add an exotic flair to the candied citrus, apricot and mineral-driven flavors. The Mâcon-Verzé is initially rather taut, but it relaxes with time in the glass and gains notable volume as well to play off veins of underlying salinity. Drinking window: 2020-2026. 89 points”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (10/20)

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  • Domaines Leflaive Macon-Verze Le Monte 2018

    £36.25

    “The Mâcon-Verzé Le Monté is a generous, inviting wine. Creamy and ample on the palate, the Monté reveals shades of tangerine oil, chamomile, marzipan and yellow flowers, all in an expansive style that has a ton to offer. Open-knit and fleshy, the 2018 shows a lot of immediacy. Drinking window: 2020-2026. 91 points”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (10/20)

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  • Domaines Leflaive Macon-Verze Les Chenes 2018

    £35.99

    “The 2018 Mâcon-Verzé Les Chenes is airy and gracious in the glass. Ripe pear, apricot, jasmine and passionfruit give the 2018 an exotic, floral feel that is impossible to miss. On the palate, the Chenes is airy and nicely lifted, not to mention super appealing. This is such a refined Burgundy. Drinking window: 2020-2026. 90 points”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (10/20)

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  • Droin Chablis Grand Cru Les Clos 2018

    £69.99

    “The 2018 Chablis Les Clos Grand Cru is a dense, spherical wine built on power and texture. Lemon confit, apricot, marzipan, dried flowers, chamomile all build as this creamy, voluptuous Chablis shows off its vivid personality. Bright saline notes cut through all the richness, giving the wine energy and a sense of crystalline beauty that is not easy to express with words. Today, I find the 2018 just a bit closed. I won’t be surprised if it is even better from bottle. 93-95 points

    Benoît Droin showed me a stunning range of wines in both 2018 and 2017, culminating with a handful of library wines. I could have spent the whole day in these cellars. Over the last few years, Droin has emerged as one of the most exciting domaines in Chablis. The wines are marked by their energy, nuance and site-specific expression. As is the case in pretty much every cellar, the 2018s are open-knit and inviting, while the 2017s are more vibrant and nervy.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (01/20)

    Benoit, the current winemaker, is the 14th generation of the Droin family to be involved in the wine trade – this lineage goes back to at least 1620! He is putting his stamp on this address by dialling back on his father’s (Jean-Paul’s) use of new oak and each wine now receives the treatment that its terroir can handle, e.g. the village Chablis is fermented and matured in tank whereas the grand cru Les Clos receives 50% barrel fermentation and maturation. However, please note that the percentage of new oak here is limited to 10%. So, if you enjoy Chardonnay in the hands of a top exponent, not to mention that distinctive minerality which is attributable to Kimmeridgean limestone from the Jurassic period, these great wines of terroir are for you!

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    Droin Chablis Grand Cru Vaudesir 2018

    £49.99

    “The 2018 Chablis Vaudésir Grand Cru is one of the most exotic, flamboyant wines in the range. Marzipan, candied lemon confit, passionfruit and honeyed notes add to an impression of deep, exotic beauty. The 2018 isn’t a shy wine, nor it is exactly subtle, but it is flat-out delicious and arresting in its beauty. Drink it with richer foods. 93-95 points

    Benoît Droin showed me a stunning range of wines in both 2018 and 2017, culminating with a handful of library wines. I could have spent the whole day in these cellars. Over the last few years, Droin has emerged as one of the most exciting domaines in Chablis. The wines are marked by their energy, nuance and site-specific expression. As is the case in pretty much every cellar, the 2018s are open-knit and inviting, while the 2017s are more vibrant and nervy.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (01/20)

    Benoit, the current winemaker, is the 14th generation of the Droin family to be involved in the wine trade – this lineage goes back to at least 1620! He is putting his stamp on this address by dialling back on his father’s (Jean-Paul’s) use of new oak and each wine now receives the treatment that its terroir can handle, e.g. the village Chablis is fermented and matured in tank whereas the grand cru Les Clos receives 50% barrel fermentation and maturation. However, please note that the percentage of new oak here is limited to 10%. So, if you enjoy Chardonnay in the hands of a top exponent, not to mention that distinctive minerality which is attributable to Kimmeridgean limestone from the Jurassic period, these great wines of terroir are for you!

    In Stock

  • Maison Dampt Chablis Grand Cru Bougros 2019

    £49.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Marc Colin Chassagne-Montrachet Les Encegnieres 2015

    £59.99

    “The 2015 Chassagne Montrachet les Encegnieres was matured in 20% new oak with 30% aged in foudres. It offers quite a complex array of scents: citrus peel, oyster shell, wet granite and a subtle fumé-like aroma. It seemed relatively mercurial in the glass compared to its peers. The palate is very well balanced with fine acidity, good body and depth here with fine tension and energy displayed on the finish. This should become a very satisfying Chassagne-Montrachet punching at premier cru quality. Drink: 2018-2028. 90-92 points

    Damien Colin informed me that he had been taking English lessons in recent weeks so he invited me to conduct the tasting in his second language, rather than French as we usually do. I must say, he has a good teacher because he spoke very well. But it was the wines that did the talking, fluently translating the vagaries of their respective terroirs. A few of his whites had been bottled in August just before the harvest, although most of the range will be bottled early spring next year. “The 2015 vintage was easy,” Damien told me, laughing at that thought after the trauma of the 2016. “After the high temperatures we started picking on 2 September. We thought that the fruit would be riper after a sunny vintage but the alcoholic degree was very correct in the end, between 12.5° and 13.0°. The problem was the acidity but after the malolactic the acidity levels stayed constant. [A phenomenon that a couple of growers had told me, including David Croix at Domaine des Croix.] The wines were less rich and fresher than we expected. We search more and more freshness and acidity, and we had a lot of that in Saint Aubin because of the limestone soils. The vinification was normal although now we are using more and more foudres, which we like because it helps us keep the freshness and does not impart too much taste of the wood. In addition we discovered that there is more carbonic gas remaining after the two fermentations so that means that the wine is more protected and we do not need to use so much SO2. It means these wines have more energy. We use 30-40% maximum for each cuvée.”

    This was another very impressive set of wines from Damien and Joseph Colin, reaffirming their position as one of the best winemakers in the Côte de Beaune. As I remarked to Damien, I felt that their strongest suit is their Saint Aubins, whose limestone soils advantaged them in the warmth of the 2015 season, imparting the acidity naturally and retaining good pH levels. This was evidenced by the Chassagne-Montrachet that did not quite deliver the same race and nervosité. If you can find their Grand Crus, then you have my congratulations. As I mention in the tasting notes, they had the novel idea of commissioning a specially-made barrel with staves alternating between old and new to inhibit the influence of the oak. I thought this worked especially well with the exemplary Montrachet Grand Cru. Overall, it was a marvelous set of whites from Joseph and Damien Colin that are mostly strongly recommended.”

    Neal Martin, Wine Advocate (228)

    In Stock

  • Marc Colin Chassagne-Montrachet Margaux 2016

    £59.99

    “The 2016 Chassagne-Montrachet “Margaux” is a blend of premier cru vineyards (see producer introduction for details). It has quite a complex nose of lemon curd, white pepper, lanolin and yellow fruit, not a million miles away from a white northern Rhône in style. The palate is well balanced with lemon zest, peach, apricot and a touch of passionfruit, the acidity well judged, perhaps the oak a little more conspicuous on the finish even though it is the same as the other village crus. Give this a couple of years in bottle because it will be a delicious Chassagne. Drink: 2019-2028. 89-91 points

    This writer has regaled the wines of Domaine Marc Colin for a few vintages now. Of course, things never stay the same. Damian Colin informed me that as of one month before my visit in October 2017, his brother Joseph had amicably branched out under his own name, resulting in a split of their 20 hectares of holdings, with Joseph overseeing around six hectares and Damian, together with his sister Caroline, the remainder. These currently include the precious parcels of grand cru, the Montrachet a fermage with their father and Bâtard-Montrachet rented from their parents. Of course, I wish Joseph all the best and will endeavor to taste his wines as soon as I can.

    As usual we tasted Damian’s portfolio in the tasting room with its slight rearrangements due to the frosts, Damian speaking in English which improves dramatically each time we meet. “It was very difficult because of the frost in April,” he began, as doubtless many others in his locale would do. “During the nights of 26 and 27 April the temperature fell to -5° Celsius, but the damage was done via a combination of the frost and sun the following morning. In 2017, faced with the same problem, we burned bales of straw in the vineyard. But in 2016 the result is that there is 70% crop less than normal. The Chassagne-Montrachet and Saint-Aubin premier crus were severely affected, with Saint-Aubin village and Aligoté less so. There was a big attack of oidium in June around Saint-Aubin and Puligny-Montrachet, hail in Remilly and Chatenerie. But this was not as damaging as the oidium. After June it was warm with a lot of humidity but there was no rot. There was some rain at the beginning of September, which was important because it had been so dry. We started the harvest on 23 September for six days, whereas it is usually ten days, and we did not have to do a lot of sorting because the maturity was very good. The fermentation was normal, classic you might say. For the reds we now undertake pre-ferment cooling periods and longer fermentation for more color and aromas. Normally we have four different Chassagne-Montrachet premier crus. This year there is no Chenevottes…it was completely wiped out. So we introduced the Chassagne-Montrachet “Margaux” cuvée, named after my paternal grandmother Marguerite, a mix of 80% Enseignères and 20% Les Parclot. In addition, there is the Saint-Aubin “3C,” a mix of three different premier crus: Combes, Les Créots and Clos des Meix. Thirdly, there is Saint-Aubin “Luce,” the nickname of my maternal grandmother, which is a blend of Fontenots and other parcels. For the Montrachet and Bâtard-Montrachet, we asked a tonnelier to make a barrel corresponding to the exact size of our [diminished] production. So they cut the ends off of a one-year-old barrel and replaced each end panel with new wood, representing 40% of the surface area. There are 130 liters of the Bâtard-Montrachet and 170 liters of the Montrachet.”

    This was a less consistent range from Damian but one not without its peaks, and that is simply down to the challenges thrown by what can only be described as the beginning of a growing season from hell. I felt that those vines in Chassagne-Montrachet were discombobulated by the frost, hail and oidium and even those that survived appeared muted and missed some of their usual nervosité compared to the range of Saint-Aubins. They seem to have shrugged off the growing season more successfully, including some really quite superb village crus that should not be ignored. The grand crus are outstanding, particularly the Montrachet, although finding any will be like looking for a needle in a haystack.”

    Neal Martin, Wine Advocate (234)

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