Showing 1–12 of 21 results

  • Gravner Breg Bianco 2011

    £109.95

    “Roughly thirty-two hectares (of which eighteen are under vine) located in the high quality area of Oslavia in the Collio, a true if unofficial grand cru for Ribolla Gialla. The estate is arguably Italy’s best (by far) at making minimal intervention wines, with long macerations, was one of the first to turn to amphoras as an aging vessel. There is simply no comparison between Gravner’s wines (in matters of texture, cleanliness, precision and depth) and similarly made wines by practically anyone else in the region or the country, for that matter. That fact recognized, I want to stress that the talent level has always been extraordinary here, such that the wines have always been outstanding, and this was true even long ago when long macerations and amphoras weren’t an issue. Witness for example the magnificent 1983 Ribolla Gialla that I remember well from my university days in Rome. Today the estate is all about trying to re-establish a natural balance in its vineyards (for example by creating ponds on the property and by planting olive, wild apple trees and cypresses to create a habitat for different animals), moving away with as much technology and equipment and utensils as possible, such as barriques. Over the years the estate has also moved away from a lot of the different varieties it had planted, so there are no more Chardonnay, Merlot and Pinot Grigio wines produced, for example. The Ribolla Gialla wines age extremely well and though you have to like white wines being treated as reds, it’s hard to argue with their quality. Even more impressive is the Rosso Breg, made with Pignolo (the only red grape left on the property), a variety that gives “tough tannins” a whole new meaning, yet Gravner’s version is remarkably complex and smooth.”

    Ian D’Agata, Vinous (05/18)

    In Stock

  • Gravner Breg Rosso 2005

    £119.99

    “Vivid full ruby-purple. Blackberry, violet and aromatic herbs on the nose, along with some flinty minerality and a hint of blueberry pie. Enters bright and juicy, then turns surprisingly plush and sweet in the mouth, with an enticingly wild quality to the concentrated blue and red berry flavors. Boasts terrific density of fruit and silky texture, not to mention harmonious acidity. Finishes suavely tannic and extremely long with noteworthy clarity and cut. An absolutely knockout Pignolo: very well done. Fermented in amphoras with indigenous yeasts and no temperature control. The wine spent five months in buried amphoras, then five years in large oak barrels. Drinking window: 2018-2025. 95 points

    Roughly thirty-two hectares (of which eighteen are under vine) located in the high quality area of Oslavia in the Collio, a true if unofficial grand cru for Ribolla Gialla. The estate is arguably Italy’s best (by far) at making minimal intervention wines, with long macerations, was one of the first to turn to amphoras as an aging vessel. There is simply no comparison between Gravner’s wines (in matters of texture, cleanliness, precision and depth) and similarly made wines by practically anyone else in the region or the country, for that matter. That fact recognized, I want to stress that the talent level has always been extraordinary here, such that the wines have always been outstanding, and this was true even long ago when long macerations and amphoras weren’t an issue. Witness for example the magnificent 1983 Ribolla Gialla that I remember well from my university days in Rome. Today the estate is all about trying to re-establish a natural balance in its vineyards (for example by creating ponds on the property and by planting olive, wild apple trees and cypresses to create a habitat for different animals), moving away with as much technology and equipment and utensils as possible, such as barriques. Over the years the estate has also moved away from a lot of the different varieties it had planted, so there are no more Chardonnay, Merlot and Pinot Grigio wines produced, for example. The Ribolla Gialla wines age extremely well and though you have to like white wines being treated as reds, it’s hard to argue with their quality. Even more impressive is the Rosso Breg, made with Pignolo (the only red grape left on the property), a variety that gives “tough tannins” a whole new meaning, yet Gravner’s version is remarkably complex and smooth.”

    Ian D’Agata, Vinous (05/18)

    In Stock

  • Lis Neris Gris Pinot Grigio 2018

    £27.95

    “The 2018 Pinot Grigio Gris is gorgeous. Here I’m finding a dusting of exotic spice and white smoke that blows off to reveal crushed yellow apples and hints of green melon. It’s silky and pliant, contrasted by salty minerality, with brisk acids that enliven its ripe orchard fruits. Hints of vanilla bean, white flowers and a twang of candied citrus linger, making for a fully satisfying finale. Drinking window: 2021-2024. 91 points”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (01/21)

    In Stock

  • Lis Neris Jurosa Chardonnay 2017

    £27.95

    “The 2017 Chardonnay Jurosa puts savory spice and minerality first, slowly evolving to show a pretty expression of dried apricot and ginger with hints of roasted hazelnut. It’s silky in texture, balanced by bright acids and yellow citrus, which brings further energy to its notes of ripe apple and pear. There’s a richness that lingers here with hints of almond and brioche, creating a fully satisfying expression from start to finish. Drinking window: 2021-2028. 92 points”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (01/21)

    In Stock

  • Lis Neris Pinot Grigio 2019

    £22.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Livio Felluga Illivio 2018

    £29.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Livio Felluga Terre Alte 2019

    £69.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Ronchi di Cialla Ciallabianco 2017

    £22.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Ronchi di Cialla Ribolla Gialla 2019

    £20.99

    “The 2019 Ribolla Gialla wafts up notes of sweet green melon, raw honey and wet stone. There are unexpected depths beneath its silky textures, at times leaning on ripeness, then richness, then tension, and finally acid-driven vibrancy. White peach, yellow apple and masses of inner florals define the long and dramatic finale. Drinking window: 2021-2026. 92 points”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (01/21)

    In Stock

  • Ronchi di Cialla Schioppettino 2011

    £46.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Ronchi di Cialla Schioppettino 2015

    £39.99

    “Bright, deep ruby-red. Captivating aromas of boysenberry, blueberry and balsamic reduction. Dense, sweet and savory, with exotic flavors of candied blackberry, wet stones and sandalwood. Sneakily concentrated, complex and enlivened by perfectly integrated acidity, this lovely example of Schioppettino finishes long with a refined mouthfeel but also palate-staining depth. Drinking window: 2018-2029. 93 points

    Ronchi di Cialla, one of Italy’s best wine estates, has long been under the radar, but also a fantastic source of exceptional wines made from the region’s native grapes. The Rapuzzi family deserves the historical credit of having saved (thanks also to the help of the Nonino distilling family), the Schioppettino grape variety from oblivion. The Verduzzo and the Picolit are also exceptional wines, and like all of this estate’s output very typical of the cool mesoclimate of the Cialla area, not far from Prepotto. The fresh Ribolla Gialla brims with early appeal and the Refosco del Peduncolo Rosso is also refined and ageworthy, and not to be missed.”

    Ian D’Agata, Vinous (05/18)

    In Stock

  • Ronco del Gnemiz Buri Bellaria Friulano 2019

    £48.49

    “The 2019 Friulano Buri Bellaria isn’t quite ready to reveal all of its charms, opening with an alluring yet understated bouquet of ripe pears, apples, hints of mulling spice and dusty florals. It’s an opulent and soothing expression, coasting across a medium-bodied frame with ripe orchard fruits and a hint of custard that comes forward toward the close. There’s a density here that masks a more structured expression beneath, with residual acids which maintain an energetic feel. You can certainly enjoy the 2019 now, but the best is yet to come. Give the 2019 a year or two of cellaring, and watch it shine. The Buri Bellaria hails a vineyard which is managed by the Palazzolo family in Buttrio, and it shows a fruitier and more exotic expression than the estate bottling. Drinking window: 2022-2039. 91 points

    Talk about tasting terroir. My conversation and tasting with Christian Patat of Ronco del Gnemiz left me wishing that I was in Friuli, boots on the ground and digging my hands through the ponca soils that the region is known for. Like a number of their well-known winemaking neighbors, the style of Ronco del Gnemiz is one of transparency, using natural, sustainable means (certified organic but not advertising), a gentle approach to winemaking with barrel fermentation and aging sur lee, while keeping the processes the same throughout most of the range, in order to deliver a sense of place. The only major differences with the white wines is a deft use of oak on the Chardonnays where they go through both fermentation and malolactic in 228-liter barrique. Otherwise, what you taste is the fruit that the vineyard yields. This was evident while sampling the Friulano San Zuan and the Friulano Buri Bellaria, both gorgeous expressions for very different reasons. In a region where Friulano isn’t often broken down by vineyard designations within one producer’s portfolio, at Gnemiz, you can taste the austere, nervous and stony character of the San Zuan against the riper and more exotic opulence of the Buri Bellaria. Another example is the Sauvignon Blanc Sol and the Sauvignon Blanc Peri, both located within the estate vineyards yet drastically different in character, resulting from a difference of vine age, elevation and soils. Another exciting topic that came up was the debut bottling of the Buri Bellaria Rosso, an old-vine Merlot with a dollop of Refosco from a vineyard in Buttrio, which up until recently was managed by Enzo Pontoni of Miani. It’s a beautiful effort and a wine that we should all be watching closely over the coming vintages. Getting back to estate versus leased or managed vineyards, it’s important to note that Ronco del Gnemiz tends to fourteen total hectares, split evenly between the estate parcels located around the winery and the managed parcels throughout the region. A fun fact is that the word “Ronco” refers to a hilltop with vineyards (think of “Bricco” in Piedmont), and it also depicts a wine made only from estate fruit; and so an easy way to tell the difference between the source of fruit between estate and managed vineyards throughout the portfolio here is that only the estate bottles are labeled as Ronco del Gnemiz, while the others show only Gnemiz, with “made at” spelled out in a code resembling braille.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (01/21)

    In Stock