Showing 1–12 of 25 results

  • Catherine & Pierre Breton Bourgueil Les Perrieres 2015

    £31.99

    “With Catherine Breton’s roots in Vouvray and her husband Pierre’s in Bourgueil, theirs is marriage of natural wine superstars. The Bretons are famed producers of both Cabernet Franc and Chenin Blanc, and they’ve been deeply committed to biodynamic winegrowing since 1994 (having been organic since 1991). It’s way of life. In fact, when I visited, Catherine said worriedly, “Today is maybe not a good day to taste on the biodynamic calendar.” Unlike some fellow natural winemakers, the Bretons are committed to bottling appellation wines, and not Vin de France. “We try to stay in the appellations,” Catherine said. “But it’s very difficult.””

    Jason Wilson, Vinous (07/20)

    In Stock

  • Domaine de Belliviere Coteaux du Loir Vieilles Vignes Eparses 2016

    £46.95

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Domaine de la Chevalerie Bourgueil Breteche 2015

    £22.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Domaine de la Chevalerie Bourgueil Chevalerie 2015

    £27.99

    “Cultivated not far from Galichets yet at the bottom of the hillside and close to the domaine in Restigné, the 2015 Bourgueil Chevalerie is from vines averaging 65 to 70 years old on clay-silex soils and is very fine and a bit reductive on the intense nose. Round, refined and juicy on the palate, with fine tannins and very good length, this is a full-bodied, refreshing and tensioned, gastronomic red wine with a salty finish. Drink: 2021-2035. 91 points

    Situated in Restigné in the Bourgueil appellation, Domaine de la Chevalerie has a family history nearly 400 years long. Pierre Caslot took care of the organically (since 2008) and biodynamically (2012) cultivated 33 hectares of vineyards until his death in autumn 2014. Then the 13th generation, his daughters Stéphanie and Laurie and son Emmanuel, took over, and it was Stéphanie who guided my first tasting at the domaine back in spring 2018. I liked the balance and gentleness of the fruity and refined wines a lot and even bought some of them, in particular, the matured ones, since the Cabernet Francs of the domaine age terrifically well and gain in finesse and complexity. However, I lost contact in the few following years and was very sad when Laurie Caslot told me this summer that her sister Stéphanie passed away far too early. Laurie said she and Emmanuel would continue “in her memory.”

    The Caslots cultivate Cabernet Franc on the hillside of the villages of Restigné and Benais in five different lieux-dits, all situated in excellent terroirs on alluvial, clay, sand and chalk soils that all give particular wines. The family seeks to make “wines that are the most natural expression of their vintage and of their terroir,” which means that the individual maturity of each parcel is accepted and the fruits are harvested by hand in small boxes to conserve the integrity of the fruit. The whole bunches are first sorted by hand, then 100% destemmed before the berries are sorted again before the vats are filled by gravity. The controlled fermentation is natural and the maceration is gentle. The wines are then aged in demi-muids and large vats of 400 or 500 liters as well as in terracotta amphorae and ceramic jars.

    I recommend being patient with the wines, even though they are already attractive as young wines. However, what you gain after 15 or more years can be even more spectacular.”

    Stephan Reinhardt, Wine Advocate (08/21)

    In Stock

  • Domaine de la Chevalerie Bourgueil Galichets 2011

    £20.99

    “Cultivated not far from Galichets yet at the bottom of the hillside and close to the domaine in Restigné, the 2015 Bourgueil Chevalerie is from vines averaging 65 to 70 years old on clay-silex soils and is very fine and a bit reductive on the intense nose. Round, refined and juicy on the palate, with fine tannins and very good length, this is a full-bodied, refreshing and tensioned, gastronomic red wine with a salty finish. Drink: 2021-2028. 90 points

    Situated in Restigné in the Bourgueil appellation, Domaine de la Chevalerie has a family history nearly 400 years long. Pierre Caslot took care of the organically (since 2008) and biodynamically (2012) cultivated 33 hectares of vineyards until his death in autumn 2014. Then the 13th generation, his daughters Stéphanie and Laurie and son Emmanuel, took over, and it was Stéphanie who guided my first tasting at the domaine back in spring 2018. I liked the balance and gentleness of the fruity and refined wines a lot and even bought some of them, in particular, the matured ones, since the Cabernet Francs of the domaine age terrifically well and gain in finesse and complexity. However, I lost contact in the few following years and was very sad when Laurie Caslot told me this summer that her sister Stéphanie passed away far too early. Laurie said she and Emmanuel would continue “in her memory.”

    The Caslots cultivate Cabernet Franc on the hillside of the villages of Restigné and Benais in five different lieux-dits, all situated in excellent terroirs on alluvial, clay, sand and chalk soils that all give particular wines. The family seeks to make “wines that are the most natural expression of their vintage and of their terroir,” which means that the individual maturity of each parcel is accepted and the fruits are harvested by hand in small boxes to conserve the integrity of the fruit. The whole bunches are first sorted by hand, then 100% destemmed before the berries are sorted again before the vats are filled by gravity. The controlled fermentation is natural and the maceration is gentle. The wines are then aged in demi-muids and large vats of 400 or 500 liters as well as in terracotta amphorae and ceramic jars.

    I recommend being patient with the wines, even though they are already attractive as young wines. However, what you gain after 15 or more years can be even more spectacular.”

    Stephan Reinhardt, Wine Advocate (08/21)

    In Stock

  • Gerard Boulay Sancerre 2020

    £27.99

    “This is a fruity, fragrant and fresh Sancerre, but there’s a little more to it than that. 40-year-old vines grown on limestone and clay-limestone yield a subtle and tender expression that caresses the palate before bright acidity zips the 2020 Sancerre together in a linear finish. It offers plenty of primary brightness, including florals, pear and just-ripe pineapple notes that linger on the medium-length, chalk-like finish. Enjoy in youth for both its vivacity and its succulent embrace. Drinking window: 2021-2028. 88 points”

    Rebecca Gibb, Vinous (08/21)

    In Stock

  • Gerard Boulay Sancerre Clos de Beaujeu 2018

    £35.99

    “Boulay’s 2018 Sancerre Clos de Beaujeu, tasted from magnum, is gracious, airy and understated. Everything about the 2018 speaks to finesse. Lemon oil, mint, sage and white pepper all open with a bit of air, lending brightness and creating a very appealing upper register to play off the fruit. Drinking window: 2020-2030. 92 points

    I found much to admire in these new releases (and a few older vintages) from Gérard Boulay. These are relatively open-knit Sancerres that are gently shaped by a light touch of oak that softens the contours but without being especially intrusive otherwise.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (10/20)

    In Stock

  • Gerard Boulay Sancerre La Cote 2019

    £44.99

    “From a southeast-facing plot, the 2019 Sancerre La Côte is pure, deep and intense yet also fresh on the iodine-scented nose, with grip, lemon and tropical notes. The wine opens bright, clear and almost tropical on the nose and then shows tight, tense and lingering salinity and firm grip. Tasted in February 2021. Drink: 2021-2035. 93 points”

    Stephan Reinhardt, Wine Advocate (03/21)

    In Stock

  • Gerard Boulay Sancerre Monts Damnes 2019

    £39.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Gerard Boulay Sancerre Rose Sibylle 2018

    £20.99

    Was £24..99

    “Limpid orange-pink. Highly perfumed aromas of mineral-tinged red berries and citrus fruits, plus a suave floral nuance that gains strength as the wine opens up. Concentrated yet lithe on the palate, offering intense red currant, bitter cherry, rose pastille and anise flavors that unfurl and turn sweeter on the back half. The mineral and floral notes return on the penetrating finish, which hangs on with strong tenacity. Drinking window: 2019-2024. 92 points”

    Josh Raynolds, Vinous (08/19)

    In Stock

  • Gerard Boulay Sancerre Rose Sibylle 2019

    £26.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Henri Bourgeois Pouilly-Fume La Demoiselle de Bourgeois 2017

    £29.99

    “Made from a strict selection of the best Sauvignon Blanc grapes, the 2017 Pouilly-Fumé La Demoiselle de Bourgeois opens with a clear, crisp and spicy gooseberry and leafy/earthy bouquet with moral and porcini aromas. The bouquet represents the grape variety as well as the Kimmeridgian marl terroir of Saint-Laurent l’Abbaye, which is said to be the cradle of the Pouilly-Fumé appellation. Partly (15%) fermented in 600-liter oak barrels and aged on the lees for up to 10 months, the 2017 opens deep, precise and coolish on the fresh and finely concentrated nose that exhibits aromas of lemon rind and grapefruit juice along with an earthy undertone. Full-bodied, lemon-fresh and piquant on the palate, the is an intense yet linear and elegant Pouilly with lively acidity, fine bitters and stimulating astringency on the finish. This is another excellent Pouilly-Fumé from Henri Bourgeois with a pure, iodine-inflected and lemony finish that makes it a perfect wine to serve with oysters, fish and Atlantic seafood but possibly even with dark chocolate and candied lemon rind. Tasted in Mach 2021. Drink: 2019-2029. 93 points

    Henri Bourgeois, run by the 10th generation, namely Arnaud, Lionel and Jean-Christophe Bourgeois but still also their father, Jean-Marie, remains a reliably outstanding producer in the Sancerre appellation. I tasted numerous wines from several vintages (2015-2019) in the past few weeks and months and didn’t detect any weak or disappointing bottling but several superb Sancerres. Two of the finest are the Côte des Monts Damnés and the Chapelle des Augustins, but I’d also recommend La Bourgeoise, the more so since all these are Sancerres in the lower or medium price range of the series, whereas the more expensive single-vineyard wines (Famille Bourgeois, yellow capsules) still don’t fascinate me in the same way. I find more purity, coolness and drama (or tension) in the nervy Henri Bourgeois bottlings yet more fruit intensity and richness in the special Famille selections from vineyards that are roughly one or more hectares in size, planted in the later 1980s (Le Cotelin, Les Côtes aux Valets) or in the 1970s (Les Ruchons on silex-ich soils). Please don’t forget that the Chavignol-based Bourgeois family, which works on a mosaic of many plots that are worked in respect of and in order to express their particular origins in the wines, not only produces a reliably excellent Pouilly-Fumé as well, La Demoiselle de Bourgeois, but also a remarkably fine Sancerre Pinot Noir from the Kimmeridgian marls of the Monts Damnés slopes, 2015 Le Graveron. There are many more Pinots from Bourgeois available that I haven’t tasted yet, though. Drink: 2021-2029. 92 points

    From what I have tasted, Bourgeois represents the superb qualities of the last five vintages exemplarily. I have no idea about the 2020s yet, though, but I also appreciate the 2016s and 2015s and even the delicacy of 2014 a lot. 2019, 2018 and 2017 were all abnormal early vintages, and namely 2018 and 2019 were characterized by an “exceptional sanitary state” of the grapes during the harvest. The 2019 harvest started on September 13 under slightly cooler conditions than in 2018, when the first grapes were picked on September 10. Whereas the 2019 harvest went until October 3rd, the harvest was slightly shorter (yet more generous in terms of quantity) the year before, when the last press ran on September 28. In 2017, the harvest started on September 11 and was finished 15 days later but, due to severe spring frost, brought the smallest yields since 1945. Whereas the 2018 wines are similar to the 2015s and 2009s (or, speaking of red wines only, even to the legendary 1947s), the Bourgeois family compares 2017 with the excellent 1996, “one of the top 10 vintages of the 20th century.”

    2019 was the first vintage when Henri Bourgeois used their own, terroir-specific yeast selections. The domain is currently in the process to become a certified organic producer, so further improvements are very likely to come, even though the so-called “classic vintages” seem to be over. Global warming is finally also affecting the wine style of the Sancerrois.”

    Stephan Reinhardt, Wine Advocate (04/21)

    In Stock