Showing 1–12 of 30 results

  • Andre Perret Condrieu 2019

    £45.95

    “Brilliant straw. High-pitched orange zest, melon and violet aromas show impressive clarity and take on a suave floral quality with air. Silky and sharply focused on the palate, offering vivid citrus and pit fruit and honeydew flavors complemented by a subtle chamomile quality. Finishes very long and juicy, with resonating florality and strong tenacity. Raised in a combination of stainless steel tanks and oak barrels, 10% of them new. 93-94 points

    Two thousand-nineteen gave somewhat riper fruit than 2018, Perret told me, “but 2018 is, by historical standards, quite a ripe vintage, itself.” While the Condrieus from 2017 to 2019, may not age as slowly as those from 2016 or 2015, what they might sacrifice in cellar-worthiness they more than make up for in sheer deliciousness.”

    Josh Raynolds, Vinous (05/20)

    In Stock

  • Andre Perret Condrieu Chery 2019

    £59.99

    “Vivid, green-tinged yellow. Expansive orchard, citrus fruit, melon and floral aromas are sharpened by notes of smoky minerals and lemon zest. Concentrated pear, Meyer lemon and violet pastille flavors show a suave blend of richness and delicacy thanks to a core of juicy acidity and an emerging mineral nuance. Closes juicy, taut and extremely long, leaving a sexy floral note behind. 95-96 points

    Two thousand-nineteen gave somewhat riper fruit than 2018, Perret told me, “but 2018 is, by historical standards, quite a ripe vintage, itself.” While the Condrieus from 2017 to 2019, may not age as slowly as those from 2016 or 2015, what they might sacrifice in cellar-worthiness they more than make up for in sheer deliciousness.”

    Josh Raynolds, Vinous (05/20)

    In Stock

  • Domaine de la Janasse Chateauneuf-du-Pape Blanc 2019

    £45.99

    “60% Grenache Blanc, 20% Clairette, 20% Roussanne. Aged in 10% new oak, 10% old oak and 80% concrete.

    Tasted blind. Very elegant nose – verbena with acacia honey and a sherbet twang. Golden apples, rich ripe fruit and loads of acidity keep this really interesting. Lovely weight and poise. Drink: 2021-2027. 17+ points”

    Alistair Cooper, JancisRobinson.com (11/20)

    In Stock

  • Domaine du Monteillet Condrieu 2019

    £36.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Domaine du Monteillet Cote-Rotie Fortis 2018

    £59.99

    “Dark berries, potpourri, pungent spices and a hint of pipe tobacco on the highly perfumed nose. Juicy, penetrating and appealingly sweet, offering intense blackberry and cherry liqueur flavors and a smoky mineral nuance that builds with air. Supple, slowly building tannins frame an impressively persistent, mineral-driven finish that echoes the dark berry and spice notes. 92-94 points

    It’s easy to compare 2019 and 2018, Stéphane Montez said, because “they were mostly hot and dry years, but 2018 gave a bigger crop and the fruit goes more red than dark.” That said, he’s impressed by the fresh character of that dark fruit in the 2019s, pointing out that “their energy and tannins are also not what you’d expect from a hot year.” He’s one of many producers I visited who imagine 2019 as “kind of a cross of 2009 and 2010 or, maybe better, 2015 and 2016, with structure but not too much, not hard, and there’s strong fruit expression.””

    Josh Raynolds, Vinous (05/20)

    In Stock

  • Domaine du Monteillet Saint-Joseph 2019

    £26.49

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Domaine La Barroche Chateauneuf-du-Pape Pure 2017

    £91.95

    “The 2017 Chateauneuf du Pape Pure is remarkably balanced, fresh and, yes, pure. The layers of raspberry fruit are blemish-free, so intense and concentrated that in other hands they might come across as jammy, but here, they’re fresh and vibrant, backed by a full-bodied palate that’s silky and airy in feel while possessing terrific intensity and depth. It should drink well for 15+ years. Drink: 2019-2035. 97 points

    Winemaker Julien Barrot didn’t seem to mind that yields were down in 2018. “I like vintages like this, where you have good natural balance,” he said. “After June, it was a dream year.” He’s also taken steps to try to find that balance in the vineyard. The domaine stopped performing green harvests in 2015, as the larger crops help promote freshness and lower alcohol levels. Paradoxically in 2017, the naturally low yields allowed the grapes to continue ripening despite the drought-like conditions. “Because of the low yields, we never had blocage in 2017,” Barrot said, contrasting that to the situation in 2003, 2005, 2009 and 2011. Moreover, here at Barroche, the focus is increasingly on detail, rather than power. “We always have plenty of fruit—red fruit, dark fruit—but what is important is to look for the floral qualities.””

    Joe Czerwinski, Wine Advocate (244)

    In Stock

  • Gramenon L’Emouvante Cotes-du-Rhone 2020

    £33.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Gramenon La Sagesse Cotes-du-Rhone 2019

    £27.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Gramenon Sierra du Sud Cotes-du-Rhone 2020

    £23.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Guillaume Gilles Cornas 2015

    £48.99

    “Deep ruby. A complex, expressive bouquet displays aromas of ripe, mineral-accented dark berries, cola, incense, olive and candied violet. Deeply concentrated black and blue fruit flavors show superb focus and energy, and suave floral pastille and Moroccan spice qualities emerge as the wine opens up. Shows a deft blend of richness and vivacity and finishes with strong lift, building tannins and minerally persistence. Drinking window: 2024-2033. 93 points”

    Josh Raynolds, Vinous (04/18)

    In Stock

  • Herve Souhaut La Souteronne 2020

    £26.99

    “All of the wines here are made from biodynamically grown fruit, produced with whole clusters and semi-carbonic maceration, and bottled without fining or filtration. As such, they always display fresh, spicy character and, occasionally, a hint of funkiness that I seldom find intrusive, much less overbearing. Minimal sulfur is used, so cool storage conditions are a must. I also highly recommend buying the wines as soon after release as possible, lest they hang around in less-than-ideal conditions in a warehouse or on a retailer’s shelf. Consider them highly perishable goods.”

    Josh Raynolds, Vinous (04/20)

    In Stock