Showing all 11 results

  • Gerard Boulay Sancerre 2020

    £27.99

    “This is a fruity, fragrant and fresh Sancerre, but there’s a little more to it than that. 40-year-old vines grown on limestone and clay-limestone yield a subtle and tender expression that caresses the palate before bright acidity zips the 2020 Sancerre together in a linear finish. It offers plenty of primary brightness, including florals, pear and just-ripe pineapple notes that linger on the medium-length, chalk-like finish. Enjoy in youth for both its vivacity and its succulent embrace. Drinking window: 2021-2028. 88 points”

    Rebecca Gibb, Vinous (08/21)

    In Stock

  • Gerard Boulay Sancerre Clos de Beaujeu 2018

    £35.99

    “Boulay’s 2018 Sancerre Clos de Beaujeu, tasted from magnum, is gracious, airy and understated. Everything about the 2018 speaks to finesse. Lemon oil, mint, sage and white pepper all open with a bit of air, lending brightness and creating a very appealing upper register to play off the fruit. Drinking window: 2020-2030. 92 points

    I found much to admire in these new releases (and a few older vintages) from Gérard Boulay. These are relatively open-knit Sancerres that are gently shaped by a light touch of oak that softens the contours but without being especially intrusive otherwise.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (10/20)

    In Stock

  • Gerard Boulay Sancerre La Cote 2019

    £44.99

    “From a southeast-facing plot, the 2019 Sancerre La Côte is pure, deep and intense yet also fresh on the iodine-scented nose, with grip, lemon and tropical notes. The wine opens bright, clear and almost tropical on the nose and then shows tight, tense and lingering salinity and firm grip. Tasted in February 2021. Drink: 2021-2035. 93 points”

    Stephan Reinhardt, Wine Advocate (03/21)

    In Stock

  • Gerard Boulay Sancerre Monts Damnes 2019

    £39.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Gerard Boulay Sancerre Rose Sibylle 2018

    £20.99

    Was £24..99

    “Limpid orange-pink. Highly perfumed aromas of mineral-tinged red berries and citrus fruits, plus a suave floral nuance that gains strength as the wine opens up. Concentrated yet lithe on the palate, offering intense red currant, bitter cherry, rose pastille and anise flavors that unfurl and turn sweeter on the back half. The mineral and floral notes return on the penetrating finish, which hangs on with strong tenacity. Drinking window: 2019-2024. 92 points”

    Josh Raynolds, Vinous (08/19)

    In Stock

  • Gerard Boulay Sancerre Rose Sibylle 2019

    £26.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Henri Bourgeois Sancerre d’Antan 2018

    £37.99

    “Tasted in early March, the 2018 Sancerre d’Antan offers a deep, rich and concentrated yet pure and flinty bouquet with characteristic sur-lie aromas and a bouquet that is pretty reminiscent of a fine Burgundy. Based on up to 80+-year-old, very low-yielding vines and aged in used barrels (including two rackings), this is a full-bodied, rich and juicy Sancerre with textural salinity and a long, intense and mouth-filling finish. This is a rich and intense yet also refined and vital 2018 and one of the exciting wines of the vintage. Bottled without fining or filtration. Drink; 2021-2029. 93 points

    Henri Bourgeois, run by the 10th generation, namely Arnaud, Lionel and Jean-Christophe Bourgeois but still also their father, Jean-Marie, remains a reliably outstanding producer in the Sancerre appellation. I tasted numerous wines from several vintages (2015-2019) in the past few weeks and months and didn’t detect any weak or disappointing bottling but several superb Sancerres. Two of the finest are the Côte des Monts Damnés and the Chapelle des Augustins, but I’d also recommend La Bourgeoise, the more so since all these are Sancerres in the lower or medium price range of the series, whereas the more expensive single-vineyard wines (Famille Bourgeois, yellow capsules) still don’t fascinate me in the same way. I find more purity, coolness and drama (or tension) in the nervy Henri Bourgeois bottlings yet more fruit intensity and richness in the special Famille selections from vineyards that are roughly one or more hectares in size, planted in the later 1980s (Le Cotelin, Les Côtes aux Valets) or in the 1970s (Les Ruchons on silex-ich soils). Please don’t forget that the Chavignol-based Bourgeois family, which works on a mosaic of many plots that are worked in respect of and in order to express their particular origins in the wines, not only produces a reliably excellent Pouilly-Fumé as well, La Demoiselle de Bourgeois, but also a remarkably fine Sancerre Pinot Noir from the Kimmeridgian marls of the Monts Damnés slopes, 2015 Le Graveron. There are many more Pinots from Bourgeois available that I haven’t tasted yet, though.

    From what I have tasted, Bourgeois represents the superb qualities of the last five vintages exemplarily. I have no idea about the 2020s yet, though, but I also appreciate the 2016s and 2015s and even the delicacy of 2014 a lot. 2019, 2018 and 2017 were all abnormal early vintages, and namely 2018 and 2019 were characterized by an “exceptional sanitary state” of the grapes during the harvest. The 2019 harvest started on September 13 under slightly cooler conditions than in 2018, when the first grapes were picked on September 10. Whereas the 2019 harvest went until October 3rd, the harvest was slightly shorter (yet more generous in terms of quantity) the year before, when the last press ran on September 28. In 2017, the harvest started on September 11 and was finished 15 days later but, due to severe spring frost, brought the smallest yields since 1945. Whereas the 2018 wines are similar to the 2015s and 2009s (or, speaking of red wines only, even to the legendary 1947s), the Bourgeois family compares 2017 with the excellent 1996, “one of the top 10 vintages of the 20th century.”

    2019 was the first vintage when Henri Bourgeois used their own, terroir-specific yeast selections. The domain is currently in the process to become a certified organic producer, so further improvements are very likely to come, even though the so-called “classic vintages” seem to be over. Global warming is finally also affecting the wine style of the Sancerrois.”

    Stephan Reinhardt, Wine Advocate (03/21)

    In Stock

  • Henri Bourgeois Sancerre Etienne Henri 2016

    £42.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Henri Bourgeois Sancerre Jadis 2017

    £37.49

    “Entirely from the Kimmeridgian marls of Chavignol, the 2017 Sancerre Jadis offers an intense and rich yet subtle, pure and flinty bouquet with coolish, earthy notes. Full-bodied, rich and creamy, with intensity and super ripe fruits, this is a massive, textured and mouth-filling Sancerre that is too rich and powerful for my personal taste or for the kind of Sancerre I like to drink. But this well-structured and fresh wine with its noble bitters and lemon-flavored finish will find many followers. Tasted in March 2021. Drink: 2021-2029. 92 points

    Henri Bourgeois, run by the 10th generation, namely Arnaud, Lionel and Jean-Christophe Bourgeois but still also their father, Jean-Marie, remains a reliably outstanding producer in the Sancerre appellation. I tasted numerous wines from several vintages (2015-2019) in the past few weeks and months and didn’t detect any weak or disappointing bottling but several superb Sancerres. Two of the finest are the Côte des Monts Damnés and the Chapelle des Augustins, but I’d also recommend La Bourgeoise, the more so since all these are Sancerres in the lower or medium price range of the series, whereas the more expensive single-vineyard wines (Famille Bourgeois, yellow capsules) still don’t fascinate me in the same way. I find more purity, coolness and drama (or tension) in the nervy Henri Bourgeois bottlings yet more fruit intensity and richness in the special Famille selections from vineyards that are roughly one or more hectares in size, planted in the later 1980s (Le Cotelin, Les Côtes aux Valets) or in the 1970s (Les Ruchons on silex-ich soils). Please don’t forget that the Chavignol-based Bourgeois family, which works on a mosaic of many plots that are worked in respect of and in order to express their particular origins in the wines, not only produces a reliably excellent Pouilly-Fumé as well, La Demoiselle de Bourgeois, but also a remarkably fine Sancerre Pinot Noir from the Kimmeridgian marls of the Monts Damnés slopes, 2015 Le Graveron. There are many more Pinots from Bourgeois available that I haven’t tasted yet, though.

    From what I have tasted, Bourgeois represents the superb qualities of the last five vintages exemplarily. I have no idea about the 2020s yet, though, but I also appreciate the 2016s and 2015s and even the delicacy of 2014 a lot. 2019, 2018 and 2017 were all abnormal early vintages, and namely 2018 and 2019 were characterized by an “exceptional sanitary state” of the grapes during the harvest. The 2019 harvest started on September 13 under slightly cooler conditions than in 2018, when the first grapes were picked on September 10. Whereas the 2019 harvest went until October 3rd, the harvest was slightly shorter (yet more generous in terms of quantity) the year before, when the last press ran on September 28. In 2017, the harvest started on September 11 and was finished 15 days later but, due to severe spring frost, brought the smallest yields since 1945. Whereas the 2018 wines are similar to the 2015s and 2009s (or, speaking of red wines only, even to the legendary 1947s), the Bourgeois family compares 2017 with the excellent 1996, “one of the top 10 vintages of the 20th century.”

    2019 was the first vintage when Henri Bourgeois used their own, terroir-specific yeast selections. The domain is currently in the process to become a certified organic producer, so further improvements are very likely to come, even though the so-called “classic vintages” seem to be over. Global warming is finally also affecting the wine style of the Sancerrois.

    Stephan Reinhardt, Wine Advocate (03/21)

    In Stock

  • Henri Bourgeois Sancerre Le MD de Bourgeois 2019

    £26.99

    “A precise style that focuses on purity and freshness and displays an appetizing salty edge on the finish. The 2019 Sancerre M.D. positively bursts with acidity, although disappointingly, it is a little short in the length department. Drinking window: 2022-2026. 88 points

    Based in the village of Chavignol, Domaine Henri Bourgeois is one of Sancerre’s biggest and most savvy producers. Not only does it have parcels in some of the finest vineyards in Sancerre, but it also produces wines from Pouilly-Fumé and other Centre-Loire appellations like Menetou-Salon, as well as Marlborough, New Zealand. The entry-level styles offer a clean, crisp, uncomplicated expression of their appellations, but things get more interesting higher up the scale. If you want to discover the spectrum of terroirs, whether it’s Kimmeridgian marls (try the cuvées Le MD de Bourgeois and Jadis), chalky clay (Les Côtes aux Valets) or flint (Les Ruchons), the Bourgeois tasting room would be a good place to start. The on-site restaurant is also worth putting on your must-dine-at list in the region, dishing up possibly the best beef tartare I’ve ever had, as well as the full spectrum of Chavignol cheese.”

    Rebecca Gibb, Vinous (08/21)

    In Stock

  • Henri Bourgeois Sancerre Rose Les Baronnes 2020

    £20.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock