Showing 25–36 of 48 results

  • Livio Felluga Illivio 2019

    £37.95

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Livio Felluga Terre Alte 2019

    £68.95

    “The 2019 Terre Alte Rosazzo captivates, as crushed stone and underbrush evolve into a pretty mix of lime-tinged granny smith apple and savory herbs. This is rich, almost glycerol-like in feel, yet with a core of zesty acidity and salty minerals that perfectly balances it all out. Tropical florals and hints of tangerine mix with candied citrus, young mango and an inner smokiness adding further intrigue, as this finishes with persistence and tension, just begging for a short stay in the cellar. Tasted twice, the 2019 is simply stunning and full of potential. The Terre Alte is a blend of Friulano, Sauvignon and Pinot Blanc. Drinking window: 2023-2028. 93+ points”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (04/22)

    In Stock

  • Mancini Impero Blanc de Pinot Noir 2020

    £38.95

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Marco de Bartoli Pietranera 2020

    £26.99

    “If I were permitted only one producer on the island of Sicily to introduce readers to, it would be Marco de Bartoli. When the average person thinks of Marsala, they think of a cheap cooking wine that is the last-minute errand you run right before starting to prepare a meal. What they don’t understand is that Marsala has a deep, rich history of creating wines designed to compete with the best Madeira and Sherry. The problem is that this history was buried deep beneath decades of mass production, a muddling of grape varieties and unnecessary fortification. Marco de Bartoli turned a passion for tradition into a vision of the future, and his heirs, have held the line, learning from their father’s teachings while keeping an innovative eye on new practices and trends. Today, de Bartoli continues to release purely traditional-style Marsala, using only estate-grown Grillo, the Solera barrel aging system (which uses oak and chestnut vats of various sizes) and, in the case of the Vecchio Samperi, no fortification. The Superiore wines do see a light fortification with grape brandy when removed from the Solera system, and they are then aged oxidatively in oak vats until bottling for release. Simply stated, a Marsala from Marco de Bartoli can compete with the greatest Ports, Sherries and Madeira. However, this house is no longer just about Marsala. The current generation, made up of Marco’s children Renato, Sebastiano and Giuseppina, began to experiment with dry whites produced from Grillo, Zibibbo and Catarratto in the 1990s. Today, these wines have really come into their own, showing exceptionally well, and they are true standouts in my recent tastings. What’s more, this experimentation has now evolved even further with the next level of dry whites in the Bartoli lineup, Integer. Both the Zibibbo and the Grillo for Integer are spontaneously fermented without temperature control, spend 10 days macerating with zero sulfur added, and then go through malolactic fermentation and rest for 10 months on the lees in large botti, with a small percentage of the juice spending five months on skins in clay amphora. The resulting wines are unique and stretch the imagination, yet they are also amazingly pleasing, and with notable cellaring potential.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (06/21)

    In Stock

  • Marco de Bartoli Vecchio Samperi N.V.

    £56.99

    “(17% alcohol): Luminous amber-gold. Explosive aromas of ripe citrus fruits, peach and hazelnut. Fat, sweet and mouthfilling, delivering very intense flavors of peach, hazelnut, butter and orange peel. Finishes relatively sweet and extremely long, not unlike a very high-quality Amontillado. And you really won’t notice the alcohol. Drink: 2015-2030. 93 points

    Marco de Bartoli has long been one of the best wine estates not just in Sicily but in all of Italy. Sadly, Marco, a very likable man who did so much for Marsala production, is no longer with us, but his son Renato has followed brilliantly in his footsteps, expanding the winery’s portfolio and promoting research of old local vines. For example, de Bartoli’s is the first Catarratto bottling made exclusively from the Lucido biotype (not a clone) of Catarratto Comune , of which there are three: Comune, Lucido and Extralucido. Although generations of growers has repeated the received wisdom that the last two gave the best wines, until de Bartoli came along with his Lucido bottling nobody had bothered to see if that was really the case. Those consumers who have never found a Marsala wine to like owe it to themselves to try the ones by made by de Bartoli.”

    Ian D’Agata, Vinous (12/15)

    In Stock

  • Masciarelli Marina Cvetic Trebbiano d’Abruzzo Riserva 2020

    £34.99

    “The late Gianni Masciarelli founded the winery in 1981, starting out with just two hectares. Today, Masciarelli is one of the largest producers in the region, maintaining an admirable level of quality and dependability throughout the entire range. While the headquarters are located in San Martino sulla Marrucina, Masciarelli oversees 365 hectares through sustainable practices, spread out between sixty different sites. Masciarelli is the only Abruzzo producer to source all-estate fruit from all four provinces (Chieti, Pescara, Teramo and l’Aquila). With the size and focus on choice terroir, over the decades the firm created a large yet diverse portfolio of Montepulciano and Trebbiano that spans from the pure and fresh to the most modern, concentrated and internationally-styled. As a guide to finding the wines that best fit your palate, the portfolio is broken down between the “classic” and fresher “Masciarelli” lineup, the more international and stylish “Masciarelli – Marina Cvetic” lineup (named after Gianni Masciarelli’s wife) and the more powerful and age-worthy “Masciarelli – Villa Gemma” lineup. Just be aware that there is no shortage of new French oak in the more “important” wines of the range. That said, it’s really a matter of taste.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (04/21)

    In Stock

  • Montenidoli Il Templare 2016

    £27.99

    “The 2016 Il Templare shows just how appealing this blend is with age. Soft and creamy, with plenty of freshness, the 2016 is just starting to peak now. Orchard fruit, lemon confit, mint and light floral honey accents linger. 70% Vernaccia, 20% Trebbiano Gentile, 10% Malvasia Bianca. Drinking window: 2021-2025. 93 points”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (09/21)

    In Stock

  • Montenidoli Vernaccia di San Gimignano Fiore 2019

    £23.25

    “The 2019 Vernaccia di San Gimignano Fiore offers yellow flowers, orchard fruit, dried flowers, almonds and tangerine peel. Varietal notes are given an extra kick of richness, yielding a Vernaccia with lovely mid-palate creaminess and light tropical accents, both of which add character. The 2019 is beautifully done. Drinking window: 2021-2026. 91 points”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (09/21)

    In Stock

  • Passopisciaro Contrada PC 2019

    £64.99

    “The 2019 Bianco Contrada Passochianche (PC) opens slowly in the glass, with dusty florals and hints of smoke giving way to a vivid note of fresh slices of Granny Smith apple. It’s savory on the palate with textures like pure silk and a cool-toned freshness and salty mineral core. This leaves nuances of raw almond and hints of green melon while tapering off lightly structured. The 2019 PC is an understated beauty. Drinking window: 2023-2029. 92 points

    The sad news at Passopisciaro is the passing of Andrea Franchetti in December of 2021. Franchetti was truly a visionary winemaker, both in Tuscany and Sicily, and one of the pioneers of Etna. He arrived over two decades ago, and along with a handful of other trailblazers, set out to prove the worth of this region to the world–he most definitely succeeded. My recent interview with the Passopisciaro team revealed a deep-rooted respect and love of Andrea that has inspired them to continue on in his memory, with no foreseeable changes in sight.

    As for the Passopisciaro portfolio, tasting through it is always an education, as the winery has holdings and produces single-vineyard wines from five of the most highly esteemed crus on Mount Etna (Sciara Nuova, Rampante, Porcaria, Guardiola and Chiappemacine). What adds further dynamic to this mix is that all five wines are vinified in the same fashion in the cellar; all refined in large oval-shaped oak barrels between fifteen to thirty-five hectoliters. The end result is the ability to truly study the differences of each individual terroir. Winemaker Vincenzo Lo Mauro stated to me quite eloquently, “Each contrada is like a single instrument.” To make things even more interesting, this year’s lineup included both the 2019 and 2020 vintages, which provided fantastic insights into both years and how different each microclimate performed. For a broader understanding of Etna and the Passopisciaro house style, there is the Passorosso, a blending of multiple crus, with a 45% core coming from Guardiola, and all from vines that are between 80- to 100-years-old. Collectors really can’t look at this wine as an “entry-level” expression because, frankly, it overperforms in every possible way. I often think of the Passorosso the same way that I think of Vietti’s Barolo Castiglione. It’s all about blending for balance. For a more internationally-styled wine, it’s the Franchetti that sits atop the pyramid on Etna. This blend of varying amounts of Petit Verdot and Cesanese D’affile is a permanent stamp that Andrea Franchetti has left upon Etna, having planted the vines in 2000. It has since become one the top wines being made in Italy today. As for the whites, readers may be surprised to learn that both of the Biancos of Passopisciaro are made with Chardonnay, and from locations that are some of the highest-elevation plantings of the variety in the world, at 1,000 meters. When Andrea Franchetti arrived on Etna, Carricante from this part of the region didn’t impress him; and so, in 2002, he planted Chardonnay in the Guardiola and Passochianche crus. Now that these vines have come to age, the winery also produces a Cru Bianco, the Passochianche (PC). Plainly stated, for collectors with the resource to do so, the entire portfolio is worth hunting for.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (06/22)

    In Stock

  • Passopisciaro Passobianco 2019

    £33.99

    “The 2019 Passobianco is pretty and perfumed, wafting up with vivid notes of crushed apples, white flowers and fresh mint. This is round with a pleasant inner sweetness, as citrus-tinged, ripe orchard fruits are nicely contrasted by savory herbal nuances. It leaves notions of kiwi and young peach to linger while finishing remarkably fresh and with admirable length. There is so much balanced pleasure to be found within this varietal Chardonnay. Drinking window: 2022-2025. 91 points

    The sad news at Passopisciaro is the passing of Andrea Franchetti in December of 2021. Franchetti was truly a visionary winemaker, both in Tuscany and Sicily, and one of the pioneers of Etna. He arrived over two decades ago, and along with a handful of other trailblazers, set out to prove the worth of this region to the world–he most definitely succeeded. My recent interview with the Passopisciaro team revealed a deep-rooted respect and love of Andrea that has inspired them to continue on in his memory, with no foreseeable changes in sight.

    As for the Passopisciaro portfolio, tasting through it is always an education, as the winery has holdings and produces single-vineyard wines from five of the most highly esteemed crus on Mount Etna (Sciara Nuova, Rampante, Porcaria, Guardiola and Chiappemacine). What adds further dynamic to this mix is that all five wines are vinified in the same fashion in the cellar; all refined in large oval-shaped oak barrels between fifteen to thirty-five hectoliters. The end result is the ability to truly study the differences of each individual terroir. Winemaker Vincenzo Lo Mauro stated to me quite eloquently, “Each contrada is like a single instrument.” To make things even more interesting, this year’s lineup included both the 2019 and 2020 vintages, which provided fantastic insights into both years and how different each microclimate performed. For a broader understanding of Etna and the Passopisciaro house style, there is the Passorosso, a blending of multiple crus, with a 45% core coming from Guardiola, and all from vines that are between 80- to 100-years-old. Collectors really can’t look at this wine as an “entry-level” expression because, frankly, it overperforms in every possible way. I often think of the Passorosso the same way that I think of Vietti’s Barolo Castiglione. It’s all about blending for balance. For a more internationally-styled wine, it’s the Franchetti that sits atop the pyramid on Etna. This blend of varying amounts of Petit Verdot and Cesanese D’affile is a permanent stamp that Andrea Franchetti has left upon Etna, having planted the vines in 2000. It has since become one the top wines being made in Italy today. As for the whites, readers may be surprised to learn that both of the Biancos of Passopisciaro are made with Chardonnay, and from locations that are some of the highest-elevation plantings of the variety in the world, at 1,000 meters. When Andrea Franchetti arrived on Etna, Carricante from this part of the region didn’t impress him; and so, in 2002, he planted Chardonnay in the Guardiola and Passochianche crus. Now that these vines have come to age, the winery also produces a Cru Bianco, the Passochianche (PC). Plainly stated, for collectors with the resource to do so, the entire portfolio is worth hunting for.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (06/22)

    In Stock

  • Pietracupa Cupo 2018

    £49.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Pietracupa Fiano 2019

    £24.75

    Review to follow

    In Stock