Showing 37–48 of 708 results

  • Benanti Pietra Marina 2016

    £84.99

    “The 2016 Etna Bianco Superiore Pietra Marina is more of a whisper than a shout, but it has a lot to say, as its bouquet blossoms with aromas of young peach and mango, evolving further to reveal hints of sage, sugar-dusted almonds and white smoke. Like a veil of pure silk, this slips across the palate, nearly weightless yet stimulating all the same, as salty acids and minerals build tension toward the close, balanced by ripe stone fruits. It’s persistent yet juicy, swaying between savory and sweet, while leaving the senses completely refreshed and longing for more. The Pietra Marina is an old-vines selection of Carricante from the Rinazzo Contrada on Etna’s eastern slope. It refines for 24 months on the lees in stainless steel vats prior to bottling. Put some away for a few years in the cellar, and reap the rewards. Drinking window: 2023-2032. 94 points”

    Eric Guido,Vinous (06/21)

    In Stock

  • Benanti Rovittello 2016

    £77.49

    “The 2016 Etna Rosso Rovittello Particella No. 341 Riserva opens slowly in the glass, at first backward, dusty and dark, with only nuances of dried roses to be found. Swirling adds further hints of red currant, shaved cedar and sage, yet it doesn’t fully unlock what’s beneath this youthful exterior. It washes across the palate with a more energetic expression; at first, it is silky in feel, yet has a salty mineral core and zesty acids that add grip as potent red berry fruits penetrate deeply. What remains are silty tannins that dry the senses, along with a bitter twang of savory brown spice, as the 2016 finishes with hulking structure and a hint of sour cherry that lingers. Frankly, it’s hard to tell where this is going; so for now, I remain conservative. Drinking window: 2025-2030. 91+ points

    When you’re tasting the wines of a producer who should be at the top of their game but is falling short, it’s always depressing. As for Benanti, this is an estate that was first on the scene at Etna. It’s one that helped define the single-vineyard (contradas) of the region. To this day, they continue to raise the bar with their Riserva Serra della Contessa and Etna Bianco Superiore Pietra Marina–both stunning expressions of variety and place. They also produce an exceptional Nerello Cappuccio, one of the few single-variety expressions that readers can find outside of Sicily. This all sounds great, but the problem is that I find a huge disparity between the top wines and those that fill the majority of the portfolio. Why can’t a producer like Benanti produce an entry-level Etna Rosso that can compete with the other producers of Mount Etna? Why is their single-vineyard Rosso Monte Serra, yet again, a sub-ninety-point wine, even from a good vintage like 2019? Your guess is as good as mine.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (06/22)

    Crusaders, Phoenicians, Greeks, Romans, the Mafia…..These are just some of the invaders who have left their mark on Sicily, an important fact which goes some of the way to explain the background to the delicious wines now emerging from the 23 DOCs and 1 DOCG which make up its wine map. Many historians have commented that Sicily is more akin to a continent in its own right rather than a mere province of Italy and it is this heritage more than anything which gives these wines their vibrancy and complexity, together with the infinite variation of soil type, especially on the slopes of Mt Etna itself.

    Sicily has always produced buckets of undistinguished wine – encouraged latterly by EU subsidies. More recently though, there has a been an explosion of top quality wine with many producers in the Etna DOC at the forefront of this. This is due in large measure to the tireless work of Diego Planeta whose wines many of you will already have enjoyed. As well as starting his own eponymous winery in 1995, he was also responsible for persuading Settesoli (the largest producer of bulk wine in Sicily) to expand the range of native grape varieties they were willing to cultivate commercially. The workhorse (and rather bland) and most widely planted variety in most of Sicily has long been Cataratto but now there are more dynamic wines made from Frappato, Nero d’Avola, Nerelli Mascalese and Capuccio, and Carricante – to name but a few.

    Benanti, whose vineyards lie predominantly on the slopes of Mt Etna at Viagrande in Catania, was founded at the end of the 19th century. The Etna DOC was established in 1968 but the modern era for this estate really starts in 1988 when Dr Giuseppe Benanti completed a study of soil types with a view to matching the grape variety and its clones to specific soil types. This is no mean feat as Sicily has such fabulous diversity. Since then, this producer has gone from strength to strength, with a range encompassing wines made from single native varietals to wines such as Majora, the top wine, made from a blend of Nero d’Avola, Syrah, Tannat and Petit Verdot.

    In Stock

  • Benanti Serra della Contessa 2016

    £77.49

    “The 2016 Etna Rosso Serra della Contessa Particella No. 587 Riserva is dark and savory in the glass, grumbling up with notes of crushed rocks and ash that evolve further to reveal musky black currants, hints of licorice and dried violets. This is velvety-smooth, yet not weighty in feel. Instead, the 2016 seems to glide effortlessly across the palate, yet what it leaves behind is a saturation of primary fruit and mineral tones, as well as silky tannins that penetrate deeply. The Serra della Contessa finishes structured yet long and unexpectedly fresh, with balsam herbs and a touch of salted licorice that slowly fades. This Etna Rosso is a powerhouse, but it is in need of cellaring to reveal all at its charms. Drinking window: 2024-2032. 95 points

    When you’re tasting the wines of a producer who should be at the top of their game but is falling short, it’s always depressing. As for Benanti, this is an estate that was first on the scene at Etna. It’s one that helped define the single-vineyard (contradas) of the region. To this day, they continue to raise the bar with their Riserva Serra della Contessa and Etna Bianco Superiore Pietra Marina–both stunning expressions of variety and place. They also produce an exceptional Nerello Cappuccio, one of the few single-variety expressions that readers can find outside of Sicily. This all sounds great, but the problem is that I find a huge disparity between the top wines and those that fill the majority of the portfolio. Why can’t a producer like Benanti produce an entry-level Etna Rosso that can compete with the other producers of Mount Etna? Why is their single-vineyard Rosso Monte Serra, yet again, a sub-ninety-point wine, even from a good vintage like 2019? Your guess is as good as mine.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (06/22)

    In Stock

  • Benoit Dehu Extra Brut Cuvee De L’Orme N.V. (2015)

    £119.99

    “A new wine in this range, the NV (2015) Extra Brut Cuvée Cuvée L’Orme is 100% Pinot Noir from a tiny parcel previously planted to elm trees (orme in French). Bright, focused and remarkably pure, L’Orme captures so many of the attributes that make Benoit Déhu’s Champagnes so alluring. A slight hint of reduction adds character to the Pinot fruit without being overpowering. More than anything else, though, L’Orme exudes complexity, personality and total class. I loved it. No dosage. Disgorged: April 9, 2019. Drinking window: 2020-2030. 96 points”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (12/19)

    In Stock

  • Benoit Dehu Extra Brut La Rue des Noyers N.V. (2015)

    £79.99

    “The NV (2015) Extra Brut Cuvée La Rue des Noyers speaks with real authority, and yet the 2015 is one of the more delicate versions of this cuvée so far. Time in the glass allows the wine to blossom nicely. Dried pear, smoke, herbs and dried flowers fill out the wine’s creamy frame effortlessly. Once again, the Rue des Noyers is one of the most distinctive wines in Champagne. Dosage is 1 grams per liter. Disgorged: July 2017. Drinking window: 2018-2028. 94 points

    Benoît Déhu turned out three very pretty 2015s, including the first release of his new wine, Initiation, which is a blend of Pinot Noir and Meunier. The wines are vinified in barrel and aged on their lees for about ten months, with no malolactic fermentation and bottled with minimal or no dosage.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (11/18)

    In Stock

  • Benoit Dehu Extra Brut La Rue des Noyers Rose de Saignee N.V. (2018)

    £99.99

    “The NV (2018) Rosé Saignée Cuvée La Rue des Noyers is airy and weightless, but also pretty tightly wound at this stage. I would give it another 6-12 months in bottle. A whole range of savory, floral and earthy notes are pushed forward, while the expression of fruit is pretty quiet. No dosage. Disgorged: September, 2020. Drinking window: 2021-2026. 92 points

    This is a gorgeous set of wines from Benoît Déhu. There are three single-variety/single-parcel Champagnes, and the Initiation, which is a Meunier/Pinot Noir blend. Biodynamic viticulture and a minimalist approach in the cellar are the rule. Some wines are vinified and aged in oak (Rue des Noyers, Cuvée de L’Orme), which seems to add depth and texture. Malolactic fermentation is blocked and wines are bottled with no dosage. Déhu achieves fabulous balance with his wines. The 100% Pinot Noir Cuvée L’Orme is especially brilliant this year.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (11/21)

    In Stock

  • Benoit Dehu Initiation N.V. (2017)

    £69.95

    “The NV (2017) Initiation is a beautiful, exotic wine. Apricot, orange confit, hazelnut, spice and chamomile give the 2017 a decidedly exotic feel. My impression is that the 2017 will offer its best drinking sooner rather than later, as it is a bit forward, with slightly honeyed notes that start to appear over time. Initiation is a blend of 78% Pinot Noir and 22% Meunier, vinified in oak and bottled with no dosage. Disgorged: July 27, 2019. Drinking window: 2020-2025. 93 points”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (10/20)

    In Stock

  • Bernard & Thierry Glantenay Bourgogne Rouge 2015

    £31.99

    “Thierry Glantenay’s 2015 Bourgogne Rouge is lovely, wafting from the glass with notes of smoky red cherry, cocoa and raspberries. On the palate, the wine is medium to full-bodied, supple and delicious, with a succulent core of fruit, light structuring tannins and juicy acids. This will deliver great pleasure for the best part of a decade. Drink: 2017-2027. 88 points”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (236)

    In Stock

  • Bernard & Thierry Glantenay Pommard Premier Cru Les Saussilles 2015

    £89.95

    “The 2015 Pommard 1er Cru les Saucilles is nearly entirely whole bunch fruit this year. It has a lifted boysenberry and cranberry bouquet, a touch of licorice developing with time. The palate is medium-bodied with a smooth, harmonious entry. Here it diverts more towards red fruit laced with white pepper, struck through with a fine line of acidity and bracing sense of energy towards the pastille-like finish. This is one of my picks from Glantenay this year and it comes highly recommended. Drink: 2018-2028. 91-93 points

    Whenever I hear of the travails endured by producers in Volnay, the two growers that my heart goes out to are Jean-Pierre Charlot at Domaine Joseph Voillot and Thierry Glantenay. Both produce excellent wines, both are true gentleman and both, amongst others, seem to stand right in the firing line whenever there is a sudden hailstorm or frost. Still, this does not seem to have prevented Thierry from improving his winery, which now has an extension to accommodate 50,000 bottles, necessary because his grandfather’s house that used to house part of the production has been sold. This clearly gives him and his father plenty more space to conduct their work, allowing them to work by gravity and eschew the use of pumps, and also provided a huge balcony that gives an amazing panorama across towards the Jura Mountains. Thierry told me that he commenced the harvest on 2 September and cropped at 25hl/ha due to hail. Acidity levels came in with pH level between 3.5 and 3.6. There is lot of whole bunch used at this domaine except for the Broullard at around 30% of the crop. The whites were in vat, soon to be fined and bottled in December or January. He described them as wines with the generosity of the 2009 vintage but with better acidity. This was a fine set of wines from Thierry, perhaps in a couple of places a little rustic and “big-boned” but displaying assiduous use of whole bunches and really delivering with gems like the “saucy” Pommard Les Saucilles and Volnay Clos des Chênes.”

    Neal Martin, Wine Advocate (228)

    In Stock

  • Bernard & Thierry Glantenay Volnay 2017

    £49.99

    “As usual, the 2017 Volnay Village includes two small premier cru parcels that Glantenay doesn’t wish to vinify separately, and it’s shaping up very nicely, offering up a fragrant nose of sweet cherries and berries, violets and orange rind. On the palate, it’s medium-bodied, satiny and supple, with an ample core of sweet fruit and a fine-grained, elegantly chalky finish. 89-91 points

    The disarmingly modest Thierry Glantenay is emerging as one of the Côte de Beaune’s most exciting producers of red wine. From his hillside winery overlooking the Marquis d’Angerville’s Clos des Ducs, Glantenay is producing a lovely range of elegant, pure and intense Volnays and Pommards that are increasingly consistent and stylistically assured. In the cuverie, he tells me, he is more and more content to let temperature and alcohol do the work of extraction for him, keeping pigéage and rémontage to a minimum; pressing is gentle; and élevage, without racking until the mise en bouteille, takes place in at most 30% new barrels. In the cellar, no matter which barrel you choose, the wines taste reliably wonderful: indeed, after my first tasting with Glantenay, some years ago, I was compelled to return a week later to verify that I hadn’t been imagining things, and that so serious a producer could really be so little known. That his wines sometimes take longer to bounce back after bottling than those of his peers, therefore, surprises me. Glantenay neither fines nor filters, but might the mobile bottling line he uses for the mise perhaps do a gentler job? In any case, the quality is not in doubt, and after the superb vintages of 2015 and 2016, 2017 is a worthy successor, in a lighter, more supple register, certainly, but with plenty of flavor and personality, and at last, available in normal quantities.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (01/19)

    In Stock

  • Bernard & Thierry Glantenay Volnay Premier Cru Clos des Chenes 2016

    £79.99

    “The 2016 Volnay 1er Cru Clos des Chenes comprises only older, 80-year-old vines that were whole bunch, around one-third of the blend, and the younger vines that were destemmed. It has quite a spicy nose with hints of Moroccan spices filtering through the red and black fruit and hints of sandalwood and sage. The palate is very poised on the entry with fine but firm tannin that lends it a Pommard-like personality. I like the salinity of this Volnay that gets the saliva glands flowing, crisp with an oyster shell finish that is not persistent but just very precise. It just needs a little more finesse to develop with time. Drink: 2020-2035. 90-92 points

    “We lost between 70% and 80% of volume in 2016 because of the frost,” Thierry Glantenay tells me as we taste in his house above the winery, a view of the panorama across the Jura and the Alps beyond obscured by winter mist. This is a winemaker who has been through so much in recent years, and yet he never lets it get to his equanimous personality. “In Volnay Brouillauds, where we have a hectare, we cropped nothing. We made a Volnay Village that includes one-third of the premier cru fruit from Brouillards, Les Lurets and L’Ormeau, and the rest comprises the village cru. For the Bourgogne Rouge there are just three barrels, whereas in 2017 there are 21. Fortunately some crus suffered less such as Volnay Caillerets and Pommard Rugiens. At the beginning there was serious mildew pressure but the weather became warm and dry and limited the attack. I am 80% organic but I used treatments around the time of flowering to make sure I had some crop. It was difficult for the morale working in the vines. We started the picking on 23 September and then picked over six days. The average yield was around 13 hectoliters per hectare although fortunately the major loss was with the generic red Burgundy instead of the premier crus. The vinification was normal. We did not have a lot of second-generation grapes when we went through the vineyard again one week later, but the first-generation grapes were very healthy, with good maturity. I did less whole bunch addition in 2016 than in 2015 because I did not want to take the risk with stems that might not be fully lignified.” Following Glantenay for several years now, I have always liked their approach to winemaking. It is such a pity that they have been scuppered by hail and now frost, yet there are always excellent wines to be found and 2016 is no different, particularly two of the surviving Volnay premier crus, Santenots and Caillerets. Fortunately his 2017 is more plentiful, Thierry mentioning that instead of the 9,000 bottles the domaine produced in 2016 there are almost 30,000 in 2017. Then again, that just illuminates the dearth of wines this year so grab what you can.”

    Neal Martin, Wine Advocate (234)

    In Stock

  • Bernard & Thierry Glantenay Volnay Premier Cru Les Brouillards 2017

    £64.99

    “The 2017 Volnay 1er Cru Les Brouillards exhibits beautiful nose notes of orange rind, wild berries, cassis and rose petals. On the palate, it’s medium to full-bodied, supple and satiny, with a lavishly textural attack, melting tannins and a succulent core of fruit, concluding with a long finish. In 2016, this cuvée was so small that Glantenay included it in his Volnay AOC, but happily, 2017 marks its return to the range. 90-92 points

    The disarmingly modest Thierry Glantenay is emerging as one of the Côte de Beaune’s most exciting producers of red wine. From his hillside winery overlooking the Marquis d’Angerville’s Clos des Ducs, Glantenay is producing a lovely range of elegant, pure and intense Volnays and Pommards that are increasingly consistent and stylistically assured. In the cuverie, he tells me, he is more and more content to let temperature and alcohol do the work of extraction for him, keeping pigéage and rémontage to a minimum; pressing is gentle; and élevage, without racking until the mise en bouteille, takes place in at most 30% new barrels. In the cellar, no matter which barrel you choose, the wines taste reliably wonderful: indeed, after my first tasting with Glantenay, some years ago, I was compelled to return a week later to verify that I hadn’t been imagining things, and that so serious a producer could really be so little known. That his wines sometimes take longer to bounce back after bottling than those of his peers, therefore, surprises me. Glantenay neither fines nor filters, but might the mobile bottling line he uses for the mise perhaps do a gentler job? In any case, the quality is not in doubt, and after the superb vintages of 2015 and 2016, 2017 is a worthy successor, in a lighter, more supple register, certainly, but with plenty of flavor and personality, and at last, available in normal quantities.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (01/19)

    In Stock