Showing 37–48 of 246 results

  • Domaine Leflaive Bourgogne Blanc 2018

    £56.95

    “Notes of Anjou pear, white flowers and blanched almonds introduce Leflaive’s 2018 Bourgogne Blanc, a medium-bodied, supple and fleshy wine that’s open-knit and lively, revealing a demonstrative, giving profile that will make friends in its youth. Drink: 2021-2035. 88 points

    This year, I met with Brice de La Morandière and Pierre Vincent to taste not unfinished 2019s but rather the Domaine’s 2018s from bottle—a change in the estate’s policy that I warmly encourage and support—and I found the wines showing very well indeed. As I wrote last year, while many producers along the Côte de Beaune were inclined to accept the generous yields of the 2018 as nature’s gift, arguing that Chardonnay can sustain an elevated crop without suffering dilution, de La Morandière and Vincent opted to perform an aggressive green harvest, jettisoning around 40% of the potential crop. “I’m glad we have something to show for it,” remarked de La Morandière when I complimented the concentration of the domaine’s Combettes. As usual, the wines fermented and matured in barrel before finishing their élevage in stainless steel tanks on the lees, and they were bottled under Diam with some 25 parts per million free sulfur dioxide. As is the case in Chardonnay along the Côte de Beaune in the 2018 vintage, the appellation hierarchy does make itself felt—I tend to think that low yields efface some of the disadvantages of humbler sites, whereas large crops exaggerate them—but the highest appellation bottlings here are really quite serious; and, having evoked the comparison with Leflaive’s superb 1982 vintage when I tasted them from barrel last year, I continue to think that they will blossom beautifully with bottle age.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (01/21)

    In Stock

  • Domaine Tempier Bandol Blanc 2015

    £39.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Domaines Leflaive Macon-Ige 2018

    £29.95

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Domaines Leflaive Macon-Verze 2018

    £34.99

    “The 2018 Mâcon-Verzé is bright and nicely focused. Light tropical overtones add an exotic flair to the candied citrus, apricot and mineral-driven flavors. The Mâcon-Verzé is initially rather taut, but it relaxes with time in the glass and gains notable volume as well to play off veins of underlying salinity. Drinking window: 2020-2026. 89 points”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (10/20)

    In Stock

  • Domaines Leflaive Macon-Verze Le Monte 2018

    £36.25

    “The Mâcon-Verzé Le Monté is a generous, inviting wine. Creamy and ample on the palate, the Monté reveals shades of tangerine oil, chamomile, marzipan and yellow flowers, all in an expansive style that has a ton to offer. Open-knit and fleshy, the 2018 shows a lot of immediacy. Drinking window: 2020-2026. 91 points”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (10/20)

    In Stock

  • Domaines Leflaive Macon-Verze Les Chenes 2018

    £35.99

    “The 2018 Mâcon-Verzé Les Chenes is airy and gracious in the glass. Ripe pear, apricot, jasmine and passionfruit give the 2018 an exotic, floral feel that is impossible to miss. On the palate, the Chenes is airy and nicely lifted, not to mention super appealing. This is such a refined Burgundy. Drinking window: 2020-2026. 90 points”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (10/20)

    In Stock

  • Droin Chablis Grand Cru Les Clos 2018

    £69.99

    “The 2018 Chablis Les Clos Grand Cru is a dense, spherical wine built on power and texture. Lemon confit, apricot, marzipan, dried flowers, chamomile all build as this creamy, voluptuous Chablis shows off its vivid personality. Bright saline notes cut through all the richness, giving the wine energy and a sense of crystalline beauty that is not easy to express with words. Today, I find the 2018 just a bit closed. I won’t be surprised if it is even better from bottle. 93-95 points

    Benoît Droin showed me a stunning range of wines in both 2018 and 2017, culminating with a handful of library wines. I could have spent the whole day in these cellars. Over the last few years, Droin has emerged as one of the most exciting domaines in Chablis. The wines are marked by their energy, nuance and site-specific expression. As is the case in pretty much every cellar, the 2018s are open-knit and inviting, while the 2017s are more vibrant and nervy.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (01/20)

    Benoit, the current winemaker, is the 14th generation of the Droin family to be involved in the wine trade – this lineage goes back to at least 1620! He is putting his stamp on this address by dialling back on his father’s (Jean-Paul’s) use of new oak and each wine now receives the treatment that its terroir can handle, e.g. the village Chablis is fermented and matured in tank whereas the grand cru Les Clos receives 50% barrel fermentation and maturation. However, please note that the percentage of new oak here is limited to 10%. So, if you enjoy Chardonnay in the hands of a top exponent, not to mention that distinctive minerality which is attributable to Kimmeridgean limestone from the Jurassic period, these great wines of terroir are for you!

    In Stock

  • Sale!

    Droin Chablis Grand Cru Vaudesir 2018

    £49.99

    “The 2018 Chablis Vaudésir Grand Cru is one of the most exotic, flamboyant wines in the range. Marzipan, candied lemon confit, passionfruit and honeyed notes add to an impression of deep, exotic beauty. The 2018 isn’t a shy wine, nor it is exactly subtle, but it is flat-out delicious and arresting in its beauty. Drink it with richer foods. 93-95 points

    Benoît Droin showed me a stunning range of wines in both 2018 and 2017, culminating with a handful of library wines. I could have spent the whole day in these cellars. Over the last few years, Droin has emerged as one of the most exciting domaines in Chablis. The wines are marked by their energy, nuance and site-specific expression. As is the case in pretty much every cellar, the 2018s are open-knit and inviting, while the 2017s are more vibrant and nervy.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (01/20)

    Benoit, the current winemaker, is the 14th generation of the Droin family to be involved in the wine trade – this lineage goes back to at least 1620! He is putting his stamp on this address by dialling back on his father’s (Jean-Paul’s) use of new oak and each wine now receives the treatment that its terroir can handle, e.g. the village Chablis is fermented and matured in tank whereas the grand cru Les Clos receives 50% barrel fermentation and maturation. However, please note that the percentage of new oak here is limited to 10%. So, if you enjoy Chardonnay in the hands of a top exponent, not to mention that distinctive minerality which is attributable to Kimmeridgean limestone from the Jurassic period, these great wines of terroir are for you!

    In Stock

  • Dry River Chardonnay 2018

    £50.95

    “The 2018 Chardonnay is more approachable young than many vintages of this wine, reflecting a warm summer. Hints of toasted almond and nougat accent peach and pineapple notes on the nose, while the medium-bodied palate is silky and fine but more generous than typical, with an appealing round plumpness that only tightens up a bit on the lingering, silky-textured finish. Drink: 2020-2026. 93 points”

    Joe Czerwinski, Wine Advocate (04/20)

    In Stock

  • DuMOL Estate Chardonnay 2016

    £79.99

    “The 2016 Chardonnay Estate Vineyard is rich and creamy, with a hint of reduction that adds an intriguing upper register of freshness. Orchard fruit, mint, white pepper and chalk are nicely woven throughout. The Estate is a wonderfully complete Chardonnay from DuMol that will drink well for many years to come. Drinking window: 2019-2026. 95 points

    Andy Smith and his team turned out a brilliant set of wines in 2017. The harvest was especially condensed, with most days seeing heavy picks of both Pinot Noir and Chardonnay pretty much concurrently. Smith told me the DuMOL parcels were affected by a high incidence of shot berries, which naturally lowered yields. Small berries, often with no seeds, further resulted in a collection of dense wines. Smith told me low alcohol conversions resulted in wines with a bit lower alcohol than is typical. That is fascinating, as the wines are quite rich in feel. The bottled 2016s are just as compelling from bottle as they were last year from barrel.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (05/19)

    In Stock

  • DuMOL Ritchie Vineyard Chloe Chardonnay 2017

    £74.99

    “The 2017 Chardonnay Chloe Ritchie Vineyard is beautifully floral and perfumed, with soaring aromatics and racy, layered fruit. There is plenty of depth, but in this range, the Ritchie stands out for its lifted, gracious feel and exceptional balance. Drinking window: 2020-2027. 95 points

    Over the years, I have learned to allow for plenty of time for my tastings at DuMol. I was super-impressed with the wines I tasted on my last visit. Andy Smith continues to grow the range thoughtfully. The Chardonnays and Pinots remain the strong suits, mostly because they form the core of the range and have really been fine tuned over time. The 2017 Chardonnays have turned out just as well as I had hoped they would. The wines are rich, deep and full of character. Today, I favor the 2017s over the 2018s, which come across as lighter. Then again, the Chardonnays see pretty long élevage (by California standards) of 11 months in oak and 6 months in steel (for the vineyard designates) so there is plenty of time for the 2018s to perhaps gain a bit more dimension. The two vintages appear closer in quality for Pinot Noir. Smith opted to handle the 2018s very gently in the cellar, and did half the number of punchdowns than the norm. Both the 2017s and 2018s are vivid and super-expressive. I favor 2018 over 2017 for the Cabernets and Syrahs, as the longer and more benign growing season was clearly more favorable for both varieties.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (01/20)

    In Stock

  • Egon Muller Scharzhof Riesling QbA 2018

    £43.99

    “Gooseberry and crab apple on the nose turn tart, prickly and piquantly seed-tinged when they reemerge on a bracing, firm palate. This is not one of the many easygoing, generous, slightly soft 2018s! The finish is cheek-tugging, mouthwateringly salt-tinged and highly invigorating. (The source vineyards for this large cuvée are Saarburger Rausch, Wiltinger Braunfels and Wiltinger Rosenberg.) Drinking window: 2020-2027. 89 points

    Scharzhof’s 2018 harvest commenced September 24 and lasted exactly four weeks. Müller reported not having wanted to jump the gun, because while acid levels were hardly unusually elevated, it tasted to him in the third week of September as though the share of malic acidity was still high. That phenomenon doubtless correlates with periods of metabolic shutdown during the height of summer 2018’s drought and heat, on which Müller’s assistant Veronika Lintner had commented during my visit late that year. The 2018 starting date followed three days of rain which, noted Müller, triggered what botrytis there would end up being, much of it in the form of individually shriveled berries. “I think that in the first three days of picking, we brought in a third of the entire harvest,” remarked Müller, adding that the best botrytized material was selected by early October, since at that point neither the quantity nor the quality of botrytis appeared to be improving. He drew parallels between 2018 and 2011, though he hastened to note that the 2018s are livelier, no doubt in significant measure due to their relatively low pH.

    Egon Müller characterized 2018 yields as “normal,” but from a vintage in which at some estates I encountered the largest number of bottlings I had ever experienced, his is among the smallest collections I have encountered at Scharzhof. The reason is twofold. First, as already noted, there was a relative paucity of botrytis to inform upper-Prädikat bottlings. Additionally, when it came to Spätlese level, Müller didn’t deem any specific lots worthy of smaller, separate bottlings, but was instead happy to amalgamate the potential candidates into just a single Scharzhofberger Spätlese and a single Braune Kupp Spätlese. This much having been noted, the brevity of my tasting list below is still a bit misleading. The German “grapevine” was buzzing in early 2019 with rumor of a Scharzhofberg Grosses Gewächs, notwithstanding Müller’s familiar arguments for eschewing trocken Riesling. This alleged development was connected in many observers’ minds with the departure of Stefan Fobian, cellarmaster since 2000, and his replacement by young Heiner Bollig who (in fact, quite like Fobian) lacks the academic oenological training that has long since become nearly de rigueur at German wine estates. Two fuders of Scharzhofberg Riesling (reflecting harvests at 92 and 94 Oechsle) were indeed allowed to ferment to dryness – which took some nine months – and when I met with Müller on the last day of August 2019, he was prepared to reveal that one of these would be released in some form at some point, while the other will likely be reserved for “winery internal use.” Apropos of which, there are also two fuders of 2018 Scharzhofberger Kabinett Alte Reben, which, as he did in 2015, Müller bottled separately. But one of those (the A.P. #10, which I have not tasted) is also expected to stay within the walls of the estate. (“Most of the 2015 A.P. #3,” noted Müller with a smile, “is still here. We did sell some of it, but that’s not an experience I’m anxious to repeat.”) Lastly, there were also two lots of TBA not presented to me, one of which was still fermenting at the time of my most recent visit. Müller joked that the latter might end up getting stuck in the legal limbo of “partially fermented grape juice” – or the two lots might end up being joined. (For much more about this fabled estate and its Le Gallais sister – whose bottlings are treated for purposes of the Vinous database as a subset of Egon Müller Scharzhof – consult the introductions to my accounts of their 2014s, 2015s, 2016s and 2017s.)”

    David Schildknecht, Vinous (07/20)

    In Stock