Showing 37–48 of 70 results

  • Testut Chablis Premier Cru Montee de Tonnerre 2020

    £36.95

    Review to follow

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  • Testut Chablis Premier Cru Vaillons 2020

    £32.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Thierry Germain Saumur Blanc Clos Romans 2019

    £52.99

    “Much of the finest Cabernet Franc from Saumur-Champigny is being now made by Thierry Germain at Domaine des Roches Neuves. After growing up at his family’s Château Yon-Figeac, in Saint-Émilion, Germain arrived in Loire from Bordeaux in 1991. He immediately became a leader in organic viticulture. By 1998, he was farming organically and by 2002 he had the first certified biodynamic vineyards in Saumur-Champigny. (Now a third of the vineyards in the appellation are organic.) Germain suggests that his farming has transcended science at this point: “Three years ago, I stopped all analysis, because it takes out all my emotion.” Currently, the estate is 28 hectares, with red wine making up about 85% of the 120,000 bottles annually produced. “Cabernet Franc is a rustic variety,” Germain said. “It’s vegetal, it’s volatile and it’s important to work around that. For me, Cabernet Franc over 14% loses all freshness and typicity. After 14% you lose the terroir.” The elegance, precision and purity of Germain’s Cabernet Franc is something else entirely, almost Burgundian. “It’s all about balance,” he said.”

    Jason Wilson, Vinous (07/20)

    In Stock

  • Thierry Germain Saumur Blanc L’Insolite 2019

    £26.49

    “Much of the finest Cabernet Franc from Saumur-Champigny is being now made by Thierry Germain at Domaine des Roches Neuves. After growing up at his family’s Château Yon-Figeac, in Saint-Émilion, Germain arrived in Loire from Bordeaux in 1991. He immediately became a leader in organic viticulture. By 1998, he was farming organically and by 2002 he had the first certified biodynamic vineyards in Saumur-Champigny. (Now a third of the vineyards in the appellation are organic.) Germain suggests that his farming has transcended science at this point: “Three years ago, I stopped all analysis, because it takes out all my emotion.” Currently, the estate is 28 hectares, with red wine making up about 85% of the 120,000 bottles annually produced. “Cabernet Franc is a rustic variety,” Germain said. “It’s vegetal, it’s volatile and it’s important to work around that. For me, Cabernet Franc over 14% loses all freshness and typicity. After 14% you lose the terroir.” The elegance, precision and purity of Germain’s Cabernet Franc is something else entirely, almost Burgundian. “It’s all about balance,” he said.”

    Jason Wilson, Vinous (07/20)

    In Stock

  • Thierry Germain Saumur-Champigny Les Memoires 2019

    £48.95

    “From vines planted in 1904 that sit on both flint and limestone, which is a rare combination in Saumur-Champigny, the 2019 Les Memoires is all purity of coulis-like fruit. It offers incredible concentration yet floats in the mouth like a weightless cloud. If there were a Cabernet Franc equivalent of Chambolle Musigny, this would be it. I love it. The finest of chalky tannins are just present on the finish, as if to remind you this is a red wine. Drinking window: 2021-2035. 96 points

    Thierry Germain might be a Bordelais by birth, but having ended up in Saumur-Champigny “par hasard,” he is now one of the appellation’s leading lights. The wines from Domaine des Roches Neuves have a transparency, delicacy, and ease that you encounter too infrequently. Red wine represents the majority of production at this estate, which owns vineyards scattered around the appellation, but lightness of touch and purity of fruit are common threads no matter the soil type or orientation. Even in the “entry-level” Saumur-Champigny, whose label changes color every year just to keep us confused, the hands-off approach is clear. You’re sure to be indoctrinated in the ways of biodynamics if you encounter the affable Germain, but whatever your thoughts on this method of farming, the results speak for themselves. Readers will find the wines on the market comparatively early. “A wine that is young should be good all its life – you shouldn’t have to wait five years; it’s like missing the first five years of child’s life.””

    Rebecca Gibb, Vinous (10/21)

    In Stock

  • Valette Macon-Chaintre Vieilles Vignes 2017

    £34.99

    “After years of trying, it was with great interest that I at last paid a visit to Philippe Valette’s elusive 8.5-hectare Chaintré estate. The Valette family were the first to exit the local cooperative, and they rapidly won a reputation for rich, concentrated wines that were frequently celebrated in the pages of this publication. On leaving school in 1990, Philippe began to convert the domaine to organic farming, and since 1992, their wines have never been chaptalized. Influenced by a meeting with Pierre Overnoy, Valette has come to identify with the natural wine movement, and today, his wines see little or no sulfur and increasingly long élevage—indeed, the 2006 Clos de Monsieur Noly spent fully 12 years in barrel. If the estate’s wines through the late 1990s were simply powerful, textural examples of high-quality white Burgundy (notes on several will appear in the next installment of Up From the Cellar), the wines being released today belong in a category of their own. Complex and sapid, I find them fascinating, but readers should be prepared to find wines that are quite different from any of the Valettes’ neighbors. Anyone who appreciates the Jura bottlings of Jean-François Ganevat or the Thomas Pico Chablis wines is likely to love them! My experience is that they often benefit from extended aeration, and I tend to decant Valette’s wines or follow them over several days.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (244)

    In Stock

  • Valette Pouilly-Fuisse 2015

    £44.99

    “After years of trying, it was with great interest that I at last paid a visit to Philippe Valette’s elusive 8.5-hectare Chaintré estate. The Valette family were the first to exit the local cooperative, and they rapidly won a reputation for rich, concentrated wines that were frequently celebrated in the pages of this publication. On leaving school in 1990, Philippe began to convert the domaine to organic farming, and since 1992, their wines have never been chaptalized. Influenced by a meeting with Pierre Overnoy, Valette has come to identify with the natural wine movement, and today, his wines see little or no sulfur and increasingly long élevage—indeed, the 2006 Clos de Monsieur Noly spent fully 12 years in barrel. If the estate’s wines through the late 1990s were simply powerful, textural examples of high-quality white Burgundy (notes on several will appear in the next installment of Up From the Cellar), the wines being released today belong in a category of their own. Complex and sapid, I find them fascinating, but readers should be prepared to find wines that are quite different from any of the Valettes’ neighbors. Anyone who appreciates the Jura bottlings of Jean-François Ganevat or the Thomas Pico Chablis wines is likely to love them! My experience is that they often benefit from extended aeration, and I tend to decant Valette’s wines or follow them over several days.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (244)

    In Stock

  • Buronfosse Marcus Chardonnay 2018

    £29.99

    Review to follow

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  • Domaine A. & P. de Villaine Rully Premier Cru Les Margotes 2017

    £45.99

    “From one of the village’s finest sites comes the 2017 Rully 1er Cru Les Margotés, a lovely wine that unwinds to reveal notions of pear, orange rind and almond paste. Medium to full-bodied, satiny and inciive, it’s elegant and chalky, with a penetrating, mineral finish. This is well worth seeking out, and it will evidently be a bottling to follow particularly attentively in future vintages. Drink: 2020-2035. 92 points

    I met the thoughtful Pierre de Benoist a few days before France went into lockdown due to COVID-19, and it was a pleasure to taste these new releases from Domaine de Villaine. As ever, the wines deliver what followers of this address have come to expect: tensile, mineral wines that are refined and understated. This was also my first encounter with one of the domaine’s new wines from Rully, where they have become major landholders and will soon be able to offer an enviably complete portfolio of the village’s finest terroirs.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (06/20)

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  • Domaine Leflaive Puligny-Montrachet 2018

    £119.95

    “The 2018 Puligny-Montrachet Village has a taut, crisp bouquet with scents of wet limestone, sea spray and green apple. There is fine delineation here, and more intensity than I was anticipating for a Village Cru. The palate is well balanced with subtle passion fruit and citrus notes on the entry, good weight in the mouth and fine acidity, though not as complex on the finish as other Village Crus I have tasted from Leflaive. Therefore I suspect this will be ideal for early drinking. Drinking window: 2021-2030. 88-90 points

    I met proprietor Brice de la Morandière with winemaker Pierre Vincent , who joined in 2017 from Domaine de la Vougeraie, at their barrel cellar in Puligny-Montrachet. It was nice to return having not visited for a year or two. “It was a warm year,” de la Morandière commented. “The crucial decision was that we green harvested all the vineyards in July, sometimes up to 40% of the bunches. I know that this is considered a sin in Puligny-Montrachet, but the fact is that we had two or three times more bunches than we needed. This risked us losing concentration. We commenced the harvest on 26 August and finished on September, the Mâcon-Verze picked from 3 to 10 September. In the end, we found that the balance was good in terms of alcohol and acidity.” I was pleased to taste Leflaive’s Mâconnais wines – they are often overshadowed by their Pulignys and might well constitute their best values. The standout for me was their stunning Puligny-Montrachet Les Combettes, in no small part since it was affected by millerandage and this naturally seems to have concentrated the wine. Among the Grand Crus, the Chevalier-Montrachet predictably has the edge, though do not overlook their rather splendid Bienvenue-Bâtard-Montrachet.”

    Neal Martin, Vinous (01/20)

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  • Domaine Leflaive Puligny-Montrachet Premier Cru Clavoillon 2018

    £209.95

    “A fine effort, the 2018 Puligny-Montrachet 1er Cru Clavoillon wafts from the glass with notes of white flowers, crisp yellow orchard fruit, fresh pastry and blanched almonds. Medium to full-bodied, bright and precise, it’s elegant and fine-boned, with—as I observed last year—none of the blockiness of yesteryear’s Clavoillon. Drink: 2023-2045. 92 points

    This year, I met with Brice de La Morandière and Pierre Vincent to taste not unfinished 2019s but rather the Domaine’s 2018s from bottle—a change in the estate’s policy that I warmly encourage and support—and I found the wines showing very well indeed. As I wrote last year, while many producers along the Côte de Beaune were inclined to accept the generous yields of the 2018 as nature’s gift, arguing that Chardonnay can sustain an elevated crop without suffering dilution, de La Morandière and Vincent opted to perform an aggressive green harvest, jettisoning around 40% of the potential crop. “I’m glad we have something to show for it,” remarked de La Morandière when I complimented the concentration of the domaine’s Combettes. As usual, the wines fermented and matured in barrel before finishing their élevage in stainless steel tanks on the lees, and they were bottled under Diam with some 25 parts per million free sulfur dioxide. As is the case in Chardonnay along the Côte de Beaune in the 2018 vintage, the appellation hierarchy does make itself felt—I tend to think that low yields efface some of the disadvantages of humbler sites, whereas large crops exaggerate them—but the highest appellation bottlings here are really quite serious; and, having evoked the comparison with Leflaive’s superb 1982 vintage when I tasted them from barrel last year, I continue to think that they will blossom beautifully with bottle age.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (01/21)

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  • Domaines Leflaive Saint-Veran 2018

    £37.75

    “The 2018 Saint-Véran is a very pretty and expressive wine. Yellow orchard fruit, chamomile and lightly honeyed notes are pushed forward effortlessly. A touch of reduction adds character without being too dominant. This succulent, mid-weight white Burgundy offers plenty of immediacy and deliciousness. Drinking window: 2020-2026. 89 points”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (10/20)

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