Showing 745–756 of 810 results

  • Leroy Bourgogne Blanc 2016

    £69.99

    Review to follow

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  • Lis Neris Gris Pinot Grigio 2018

    £27.95

    “The 2018 Pinot Grigio Gris is gorgeous. Here I’m finding a dusting of exotic spice and white smoke that blows off to reveal crushed yellow apples and hints of green melon. It’s silky and pliant, contrasted by salty minerality, with brisk acids that enliven its ripe orchard fruits. Hints of vanilla bean, white flowers and a twang of candied citrus linger, making for a fully satisfying finale. Drinking window: 2021-2024. 91 points”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (01/21)

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  • Lis Neris Pinot Grigio 2019

    £22.99

    Review to follow

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  • Lisini Brunello di Montalcino 2007

    £69.99

    “The 2007 Brunello di Montalcino is very beautiful in this vintage. Sweet dark cherries, flowers, mint and licorice take shape as the wine opens up in the glass. This is an especially voluminous wine endowed with tons of richness and nuance. A finessed, seamless finish laced with sweet hints of tobacco and wild flowers rounds things out in style. This is a terrific showing. Lisini gave the Brunello three years in cask. Drinking window: 2017-2027. 94 points

    I was struck with the wines I tasted from Lisini this year. All three Brunelli merit serious attention.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (04/12)

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  • Lisini Brunello di Montalcino Riserva 2011

    £99.99

    “I have not seen a Riserva from Lisini for a while, so this wine comes as a pleasant surprise. The 2011 Brunello di Montalcino Riserva takes us back to one of the warmest vintages in recent memory. However, this wine holds nicely with plenty of lush primary fruit to keep it smelling and tasting younger than its years. Dark cherry and dried blackberry rise to the top. Soon to follow are layers of spice and sweet tobacco. The mouthfeel is thickly layered but velvety smooth all the while. Drinking window: 2020-2040. 94+ points”

    Monica Larner, Wine Advocate (235)

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  • Luigi Baudana Barolo Baudana 2015

    £64.99

    “The 2015 Barolo Baudana is powerful, ample and deep, with tons of brightness to play off the sweet red cherry and pomegranate fruit. Already quite expressive, the 2015 appears to have a very bright future. Even today, its balance is simply impeccable. Within the context of the year, the 2015 Baudana is one of the most polished refined wines readers will taste. Drinking window: 2022-2044. 94+ points

    The Vajra family continues to do remarkable work in revitalizing the Baudana estate. The appellation Barolo is gorgeous, while the two vineyard designates are both distinctive, as they should be. Stylistically, the wines are bigger and more overt than the Barolos the Vajras make at their G.D. Vajra estate. Then again, here we are in Serralunga.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (02/19)

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  • Macle Chardonnay Sous Voile 2016

    £39.99

    Review to follow

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  • Marc Colin Chassagne-Montrachet Premier Cru Les Champs Gain 2019

    £89.99

    “The 2019 Chassagne-Montrachet Les Champs Gain 1er Cru is more reserved on the nose compared to the Chenevottes, touches of lemon rind and light fumé aromas. The palate is very well balanced with a crisp opening. Quintessentially Chassagne, there are lovely orange pith and tangerine notes coming through towards the finish with a long spicy aftertaste tinged with crème brûlée. Excellent. Drinking window: 2022-2040. 91-93 points

    Since splitting with his brother Joseph, whose wines will hopefully be added to this report in the not-too-distant future, winemaker Damien Colin, together with his sister Caroline, has continued to create some of the best Burgundy wines you will find in Saint-Aubin, Chassagne and Puligny-Montrachet, from his winery based in the confusingly-titled village of Gamay. “It is a complicated growing season with the frost and the ‘canicule’ [heat wave]. In some appellations we produced just 30% of a normal crop in 2019, though there are others that produced a normal yield.” Damien Colin added that in Saint-Aubin, parcels located on the slopes that normally escape frost, were affected in 2019. Vines on flatter areas that are prone to frost damage seemed to escape Scot-free. He continued saying that in Saint-Aubin, buds had already begun opening, allowing moisture to enter, causing some of them to ‘explode’ when it turned to ice.

    “Flowering was normal and then there was a heatwave in the summer, but the vines did not suffer much hydric stress despite the high temperatures that reached around 40°C. The harvest was small, so the maturity came very quickly. The vintage was expected to be 15 September but by the end of August the natural alcohol was around 12.0° to 12.5°. Therefore, we brought the picking forward and began on 7 September until 18-19 September. For the whites the alcohol degree is 13.5° to 14.0°C but with high acidity, mainly tartaric. The malic was low so after the malolactic fermentation the acidity levels are still good. The harvest was rapid because of the small yields, though we had to keep stopping and starting to be precise in terms of picking. The fermentation was quite quick, finishing around mid-November and the malos passed normally in springtime. From 2019 we no longer use SO2 until after the malolactic, which was fine in 2019 as the fruit was healthy. The SO2 inhibits some of the natural yeasts and without SO2 we have a broad spectrum of yeasts that engender more complex wine. The Village Crus are matured in around 15% new oak and the Premier Crus between 20% and 25% new oak. The 2019s are all taken from vat and will be bottled next spring with the final six months in tank.”

    The 2019s from Domaine Marc Colin do not disappoint and it is remarkable, almost irrational that such freshness could be conjured in such a dry and warm season. Standout? Perhaps surprising to some, it is not their morsel of Montrachet, good as that is, but a thrilling Bâtard-Montrachet, a Grand Cru that I feel over-performs in this vintage. If unable to splash the cash, then head for their outstanding Saint-Aubin Les Charmois or Les Combes or just buy both. I also found much to admire apropos their nervy Chassagne-Montrachets, particularly in Les Vides Bourses. Not every cuvée hit the bulls-eye, but generally these 2019s continue to consolidate Damien Colin’s reputation as winemaker par excellence. Pressing him to choose between 2018 and 2019 he replies: “It is difficult for me to say one vintage is better than the other. I find more terroir character in 2019 and I think that they will need more time.””

    Neal Martin, Vinous (12/20)

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  • Marc Colin Puligny-Montrachet Le Trezin 2018

    £55.99

    “The 2018 Puligny-Montrachet Le Trézin unfurls in the glass with scents of white flowers, fresh peach and citrus oil, followed by a medium to full-bodied, satiny and incisive palate that’s tensile and chalky. That’s quite typical of this sunny but high-altitude side. 89-91 points

    Damien Colin continues his progression towards longer élevage in larger vessels: In 2017, he purchased more 300- and 350-liter barrels, a trend that continued in 2018, and after a year in wood, his wines now see a protracted sojourn in tank on the lees. He’s adding less sulfur dioxide at harvest, finding that fermentations last longer. And longer élevage with attendant natural clarification meant that he was able to bottle his 2017s entirely without fining or filtration. Those 2017s, revisited from bottle, confirmed their fine showing last year; and 2018, rounder and more immediate in style, looks to be another success for Domaine Marc Colin, as my notes testify.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (01/20)

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  • Marc Colin Saint-Aubin La Fontenotte 2015

    £39.99

    “The 2015 Saint Aubin la Fontenotte, which sees a maximum 10% new oak and 30% aged in oak foudres, has a lovely pine needle, citrus fruit and nectarine-scented bouquet that opens nicely in the glass. The palate is well balanced with judicious use of oak that lends this Saint Aubin hints of brioche and vanilla without impeding upon the terroir expression. After a couple of minutes, I noticed an oyster shell tincture developing back on the aromatics. This is an intriguing Saint Aubin that probably touches premier cru quality. Drink: 2017-2024. 89-91 points

    Damien Colin informed me that he had been taking English lessons in recent weeks so he invited me to conduct the tasting in his second language, rather than French as we usually do. I must say, he has a good teacher because he spoke very well. But it was the wines that did the talking, fluently translating the vagaries of their respective terroirs. A few of his whites had been bottled in August just before the harvest, although most of the range will be bottled early spring next year. “The 2015 vintage was easy,” Damien told me, laughing at that thought after the trauma of the 2016. “After the high temperatures we started picking on 2 September. We thought that the fruit would be riper after a sunny vintage but the alcoholic degree was very correct in the end, between 12.5° and 13.0°. The problem was the acidity but after the malolactic the acidity levels stayed constant. [A phenomenon that a couple of growers had told me, including David Croix at Domaine des Croix.] The wines were less rich and fresher than we expected. We search more and more freshness and acidity, and we had a lot of that in Saint Aubin because of the limestone soils. The vinification was normal although now we are using more and more foudres, which we like because it helps us keep the freshness and does not impart too much taste of the wood. In addition we discovered that there is more carbonic gas remaining after the two fermentations so that means that the wine is more protected and we do not need to use so much SO2. It means these wines have more energy. We use 30-40% maximum for each cuvée.”

    This was another very impressive set of wines from Damien and Joseph Colin, reaffirming their position as one of the best winemakers in the Côte de Beaune. As I remarked to Damien, I felt that their strongest suit is their Saint Aubins, whose limestone soils advantaged them in the warmth of the 2015 season, imparting the acidity naturally and retaining good pH levels. This was evidenced by the Chassagne-Montrachet that did not quite deliver the same race and nervosité. If you can find their Grand Crus, then you have my congratulations. As I mention in the tasting notes, they had the novel idea of commissioning a specially-made barrel with staves alternating between old and new to inhibit the influence of the oak. I thought this worked especially well with the exemplary Montrachet Grand Cru. Overall, it was a marvelous set of whites from Joseph and Damien Colin that are mostly strongly recommended.”

    Neal Martin, Wine Advocate (228)

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  • Marc Colin Saint-Aubin Premier Cru En Montceau 2018

    £45.99

    “The 2018 Saint-Aubin 1er Cru En Montceau is also performing well from bottle, mingling aromas of pear, pomelo, orange oil, fresh bread and ginger. Medium to full-bodied, racy and tensile, with fine depth at the core but a more open, giving profile than the 2017 vintage, this will offer a broad drinking window. Drink: 2022-2042. 92+ points

    Damien Colin reported that his yields were some 30% below average and that the crop ripened rapidly, “even very rapidly.” Indeed, having projected a September 15 start, he began picking on September 7. Alcohol levels came in for the most part between 13% and 13.5%, with good phenolic maturity and lower pHs than in 2018. Having learned from a succession of warm vintages, every effort was made to retain freshness: working with cool grapes, minimal bâtonnage and moderate percentages of new oak. And in the vineyards, Colin is backing off rognage, working more flexibly to adapt to the vintage. All this translates to a very fine vintage chez Colin, delivering wines that are more concentrated and more clearly defined by site than the charming, open and expressive 2018s, also revisited here.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (01/21)

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  • Marc Colin Saint-Aubin Premier Cru Sous Roche Dumay Blanc 2018

    £46.99

    “The 2018 Saint-Aubin Sous Roches Dumay, which comes from more limestone-rich soils than the domaine’s other Saint-Aubin cuvées, has a taut and linear bouquet, the calcaire terroir beautifully communicated via the aromatics. The harmonious palate offers orange pith and hints of almond and brioche, a little richer and more open in style than expected, and the finely tuned and very persistent finish is an absolute joy. Another exceptional Saint-Aubin from one of its master craftsmen. Drinking window: 2021- 2038. 91-93 points

    Since splitting with his brother Joseph, whose wines will hopefully be added to this report in the not-too-distant future, winemaker Damien Colin, together with his sister Caroline, has continued to create some of the best Burgundy wines you will find in Saint-Aubin, Chassagne and Puligny-Montrachet, from his winery based in the confusingly-titled village of Gamay. “It is a complicated growing season with the frost and the ‘canicule’ [heat wave]. In some appellations we produced just 30% of a normal crop in 2019, though there are others that produced a normal yield.” Damien Colin added that in Saint-Aubin, parcels located on the slopes that normally escape frost, were affected in 2019. Vines on flatter areas that are prone to frost damage seemed to escape Scot-free. He continued saying that in Saint-Aubin, buds had already begun opening, allowing moisture to enter, causing some of them to ‘explode’ when it turned to ice.

    “Flowering was normal and then there was a heatwave in the summer, but the vines did not suffer much hydric stress despite the high temperatures that reached around 40°C. The harvest was small, so the maturity came very quickly. The vintage was expected to be 15 September but by the end of August the natural alcohol was around 12.0° to 12.5°. Therefore, we brought the picking forward and began on 7 September until 18-19 September. For the whites the alcohol degree is 13.5° to 14.0°C but with high acidity, mainly tartaric. The malic was low so after the malolactic fermentation the acidity levels are still good. The harvest was rapid because of the small yields, though we had to keep stopping and starting to be precise in terms of picking. The fermentation was quite quick, finishing around mid-November and the malos passed normally in springtime. From 2019 we no longer use SO2 until after the malolactic, which was fine in 2019 as the fruit was healthy. The SO2 inhibits some of the natural yeasts and without SO2 we have a broad spectrum of yeasts that engender more complex wine. The Village Crus are matured in around 15% new oak and the Premier Crus between 20% and 25% new oak. The 2019s are all taken from vat and will be bottled next spring with the final six months in tank.”

    The 2019s from Domaine Marc Colin do not disappoint and it is remarkable, almost irrational that such freshness could be conjured in such a dry and warm season. Standout? Perhaps surprising to some, it is not their morsel of Montrachet, good as that is, but a thrilling Bâtard-Montrachet, a Grand Cru that I feel over-performs in this vintage. If unable to splash the cash, then head for their outstanding Saint-Aubin Les Charmois or Les Combes or just buy both. I also found much to admire apropos their nervy Chassagne-Montrachets, particularly in Les Vides Bourses. Not every cuvée hit the bulls-eye, but generally these 2019s continue to consolidate Damien Colin’s reputation as winemaker par excellence. Pressing him to choose between 2018 and 2019 he replies: “It is difficult for me to say one vintage is better than the other. I find more terroir character in 2019 and I think that they will need more time.””

    Neal Martin, Vinous (01/20)

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