Showing 781–792 of 853 results

  • Francois Carillon Chassagne-Montrachet Premier Cru Clos Saint-Jean 2017

    £69.99

    Review to follow

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  • Francois Carillon Puligny-Montrachet 2019

    £57.99

    Review to follow

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  • Francois Carillon Puligny-Montrachet Premier Cru Champs-Gain 2017

    £79.99

    “Aromas of crushed rocks, white flowers, lemon oil and crisp green apple preface the 2017 Puligny-Montrachet 1er Cru Champ Gain, a medium to full-bodied, satiny and textural wine with broad shoulders and superb energy and length that concludes with a mouthwateringly saline finish. This is a real success. 91-93 points

    The 2017 vintage is a great success for François Carillon, who has produced his most successful range of wines since the inception of his eponymous domaine in 2010. Of course, this estate is only a new incarnation of a long-standing family tradition that stretches back many generations: François is named after his great-grandfather, François Virot, the pioneering regisseur of Domaine Leflaive who must rank among the 20th century’s greatest white winemakers, and he began working with his father, Louis Carillon, with the 1988 vintage. François’s style is richer and more gourmand than his brother’s, and he harvests later; but in 2017, the texture and flesh is tempered by succulent acids, and though the wines are broad and textural, they are also pure and precise on both the nose and the palate. The influence of new wood—in the past, sometimes a little prominent for this reviewer’s palate—is also deftly judged. In short, this is an exceptional set of wines that suggests that Carillon has arrived at a mature style of his own. His great-grandfather would be proud.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (242)

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  • Francois Carillon Puligny-Montrachet Premier Cru Les Folatieres 2017

    £87.95

    “Aromas of beeswax, tangerine, yellow orchard fruit and crisp green apple introduce the 2017 Puligny-Montrachet 1er Cru Les Folatières, a full-bodied, ample and voluminous wine with excellent depth at the core, succulent acids and chewy structuring extract, concluding with a long and penetrating finish. Carillon observed that this cuvée isn’t far from 14% alcohol. 92-94 points

    The 2017 vintage is a great success for François Carillon, who has produced his most successful range of wines since the inception of his eponymous domaine in 2010. Of course, this estate is only a new incarnation of a long-standing family tradition that stretches back many generations: François is named after his great-grandfather, François Virot, the pioneering regisseur of Domaine Leflaive who must rank among the 20th century’s greatest white winemakers, and he began working with his father, Louis Carillon, with the 1988 vintage. François’s style is richer and more gourmand than his brother’s, and he harvests later; but in 2017, the texture and flesh is tempered by succulent acids, and though the wines are broad and textural, they are also pure and precise on both the nose and the palate. The influence of new wood—in the past, sometimes a little prominent for this reviewer’s palate—is also deftly judged. In short, this is an exceptional set of wines that suggests that Carillon has arrived at a mature style of his own. His great-grandfather would be proud.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (242)

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  • Frank Cornelissen MunJebel Rosso VA 2017

    £59.99

    “The 2017 Mascalese Munjebel VA wafts up with a layered yet lifted display, as white smoke, cardamom and peppery herbs give way to crushed cherries and hints of clove. It’s silky and pliant in feel, motivated by juicy acidity that enlivens its tart and spicy woodland berry fruit. A subtle coating of sweet tannins and hints of hard red candies linger, contrasted by salty minerals, making for a nicely balanced and lightly structured finale. This is such a pretty expression of the vintage, and it’s already drinking very well. Drinking window: 2021-2026. 92 points

    Frank Cornelissen arrived on Mount Etna in 2001 at the head of a small handful of producers who would go on to make this region famous, but fame was never his intention. The goal throughout the twenty-four hectares of Cornelissen vineyards and in the winery was to create an entirely holistic approach of capturing a snapshot of the natural ecosystem and biodiversity of Mount Etna within each bottle. This approach prohibits the use of any chemical fertilizer or pesticide in the vineyards. Only in the most difficult vintages will copper sulphate and sulfur be used, and only to prevent a complete loss of fruit. Yields are drastically reduced and harvests are completed late throughout all Munjebel, Frank Cornelissen’s single contrade or Crus, which are located in the northern valley of Mount Etna. The vineyards, many of which contain extremely old alberello or bush-trained vines, are between 600 to 1,000 meters in elevation, planted in a diverse mix of soils formed through thousands of years of volcanic activity on the Etna. In the winery, the focus is to add nothing, yet take nothing away. Fermentations start spontaneously and are completed in neutral tubs which naturally keep temperatures low. For the more structured wines, they are refined in epoxy-coated terracotta, buried up to their necks in volcanic soil. Most fans of wines from Etna have all heard this story, but if they never experienced the results, then it’s impossible to truly understand what Frank Cornelissen has accomplished. Throughout the area, there are many producers that are now turning out world-class wines, but finding one that obtains such depth of texture, the unique character of fruit aromas and flavors, and with the potential to mature evenly in a cellar, without the use of any winemaking wizardry, is not easy to do. Granted, these wines are extremely vintage-dependent, which they should be. At the top the wines can also be cost prohibitive, yet the entry-level Susucaru is a wonderful introduction to the house style. Also, readers should note that if mishandled or not stored correctly, these wines are likely to be adversely affected much quicker than other wines – but that is the price for experiencing the purity of Mount Etna; because in the end, that’s what Frank Cornelissen is bottling.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (06/21)

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  • G.D. Vajra Barolo Coste di Rose 2015

    £49.99

    “This red exhibits purity to the rose, strawberry, cherry and graphite aromas and flavors. Sleek and elegant, with firm structure and a white pepper–accented finish. Best from 2023 through 2042. 93 points”

    Bruce Sanderson, Wine Spectator (2019)

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  • G.D. Vajra Barolo Ravera 2015

    £64.75

    “The 2015 Barolo Ravera captures all the best the vintage has to offer. More importantly, it has that extra level of textural richness and sweetness that the Bricco delle Viole does not have, at least not today. Creamy and beautifully textured in the glass, the 2015 is a total winner. Bright red raspberry and pomegranate fruit notes are lifted, while expressive floral and blood orange overtones add brightness. The 2015 suggests that the Ravera might, in time, become the flagship wine here. Don’t miss it! Drinking window: 2023-2041. 95 points”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (02/19)

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  • Gaja Rossj-Bass 2018

    £57.99

    Review to follow

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  • Gramenon La Meme Ceps Centenaires Cotes-du-Rhone 2019

    £44.99

    Review to follow

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  • Gramenon La Vie on y est Cotes-du-Rhone Blanc 2020

    £27.99

    Review to follow

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  • Gravner Ribolla Gialla 2012

    £69.99

    “Roughly thirty-two hectares (of which eighteen are under vine) located in the high quality area of Oslavia in the Collio, a true if unofficial grand cru for Ribolla Gialla. The estate is arguably Italy’s best (by far) at making minimal intervention wines, with long macerations, was one of the first to turn to amphoras as an aging vessel. There is simply no comparison between Gravner’s wines (in matters of texture, cleanliness, precision and depth) and similarly made wines by practically anyone else in the region or the country, for that matter. That fact recognized, I want to stress that the talent level has always been extraordinary here, such that the wines have always been outstanding, and this was true even long ago when long macerations and amphoras weren’t an issue. Witness for example the magnificent 1983 Ribolla Gialla that I remember well from my university days in Rome. Today the estate is all about trying to re-establish a natural balance in its vineyards (for example by creating ponds on the property and by planting olive, wild apple trees and cypresses to create a habitat for different animals), moving away with as much technology and equipment and utensils as possible, such as barriques. Over the years the estate has also moved away from a lot of the different varieties it had planted, so there are no more Chardonnay, Merlot and Pinot Grigio wines produced, for example. The Ribolla Gialla wines age extremely well and though you have to like white wines being treated as reds, it’s hard to argue with their quality. Even more impressive is the Rosso Breg, made with Pignolo (the only red grape left on the property), a variety that gives “tough tannins” a whole new meaning, yet Gravner’s version is remarkably complex and smooth.”

    Ian D’Agata, Vinous (05/18)

    “Harvest ended on 2 November 2012.

    Lustrous pale amber. Gorgeous apricot and spice nose with hints of acacia honey and white pepper. Grated nutmeg, baked apple, dried herbs… I could go on for hours. Viscous and a little luscious on the palate but this has ‘only’ 14%. Full spread of aromas and great depth, yet remains elegant and lifted because of the succulent acidity that melts into the texture. Super-fine tannins stick to the palate. Enormous length and focus. Can be approached now, but will develop much further. Drink: 2020-2038. 17.5 points”

    Walter Speller, JancisRobinson.com (07/20)

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  • Henschke Johann’s Garden 2018

    £37.99

    “The 2018 Johann’s Garden is a blend of 77% Grenache, 19% Mataro and 4% Shiraz, all matured in older French hogsheads. Scents of cola and spice meet plums and black cherries, but this is a bit reserved on the nose, with the explosiveness left to the full-bodied, lush palate. Generous and mouth-filling and marked by supple tannins and ripe fruit, it’s plump and round, with a softly dusty finish. Gulpable now, it should add some spice nuances over the next several years as the fruit gently fades. Drink: 2021-2030. 92 points

    Johann Christian Henschke, the patriarch of the Henschke family, arrived in Australia in 1841 and by 1847 had purchased land in Krondorf (Barossa Valley). His son, August, subsequently purchased land in the Eden Valley, donating a portion of the property for the Gnadenberg (Hill of Grace) Lutheran church. Christian would later add to the family’s holdings in the Eden Valley and transfer that acreage to another son, Paul Gotthard. This land is still the family’s home base.

    The first recorded sales of Henschke wine date back to 1868, with a ledger that continues to the present day. Fifth-generation member Stephen Henschke is the winemaker and his wife Prue is the viticulturist, while the next generation—Johann (winemaker), Justine (marketing and public relations) and Andreas (brand ambassador)—are gradually taking on more responsibilities.

    Flagship bottlings include the single-vineyard Hill of Grace and Mount Edelstone Shiraz and the Cyril Henschke Cabernet Sauvignon, but there are a number of less-expensive offerings that illustrate the family’s commitment to quality, including Chardonnay, Pinot Gris, Pinot Noir and Merlot from the Lenswood Vineyard in the Adelaide Hills. The vineyards are farmed along organic and biodynamic lines, and the family has gone to exceptional lengths to preserve the old-vine genetics of its vineyards and ensure sustainability going forward.

    Joe Czerwinski, Wine Advocate (03/21)

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