Showing 937–948 of 971 results

  • Marie-Courtin Extra Brut Eloquence Blanc de Blancs 2017

    £69.99

    “Dominique Moreau is a true original. Imbued with tremendous character and personality, her wines are among the most compelling in Champagne. Biodynamic farming, minimal handling in the cellar and bottling with no dosage are some of the signatures that inform these deep, often stark, pure Champagnes. Marie Courtin fans will notice the addition of a new wine, the Présence Sans Soufre, a Pinot Blanc/Chardonnay blend that is terrific in its first release. Unfortunately I was not able to taste the 2016 Resonance or 2014 Efflorescene, as the wines aren’t released yet.These are not always easy wines, but the time to explore them is always handsomely rewarded.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (11/18)

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  • Marquis d’Angerville Volnay Premier Cru Champans 2018

    £109.95

    “The 2018 Volnay Les Champans 1er Cru has an outgoing bouquet similar to the Taillepieds, albeit one with more intellectual weight and gravitas behind it. Black cherries, blueberry and light cassis aromas reveal crushed stone and undergrowth notes, all delivered with intensity and superb delineation. The palate is medium-bodied with slightly firmer, stockier tannins than the Taillepieds, darker fruit and grainier texture toward the persistent finish. I see this has having real long-term potential. Excellent. Drinking window: 2023-2050. 93-95 points

    “It was a pretty uneventful and easy season,” a typically sanguine Guillaume d’Angerville told me, as we tasted his 2018s in the ground floor tasting room within his maison that lies within Clos des Ducs. “There was an early flowering around 20 May. There was no significant mildew pressure and the vines reacted better than expected during the dry conditions. They are getting accustomed to it. They didn’t seem to suffer. We started the harvest early on 1 September. You know, the eight most precocious years have all been since I took over the Domaine from my father in 2003. We finished the picking after around five days. The vinification was unusual as the sugar levels were high for the yeasts to work efficiently and so a couple of malos took place during the alcoholic fermentation, which was not healthy for the yeast. So getting the wine to complete dryness was the challenge. Everything is de-stemmed, though for Volnay Frémiets I use a single 80 hectoliter vat and we ended up with more volume than that. So we used an additional smaller vat and in this we used 50% whole bunch that will be included in the final blend.”

    Neal Martin, Vinous (01/20)

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  • Massolino Barolo Margheria 2015

    £69.99

    “Massolino’s 2015 Barolo Margheria is a powerful, driven wine that shows the sinewy muscles of Serralunga off to great effect. Dark red cherry, plum, iron, sage, smoke, white pepper and rose petal open up in the glass, but the Margheria is a wine of structure, power and depth, its mid-weight feel notwithstanding. As is often the case, the Margheria is a beguiling wine that shows the flavor and textural complexity Nebbiolo can reach in Piedmont’s top sites. Drinking window: 2023-2040. 93+ points

    Brothers Franco and Roberto Massolino turned out a gorgeous set of 2015 Barolos. The Massolinos gave the 2015s about 21 days on the skins. Both primary and secondary fermentation were done in cement, and the wines were aged in cask. More than those details, though, these Barolos stand out because they are very expressive to site, something that was not easy to achieve in 2015.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (02/19)

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  • Massolino Barolo Parafada 2016

    £71.49

    “The 2016 Barolo Parafada is fabulous. In fact, the 2016 is one of the best – if not the best – Parafadas I have ever tasted at Massolino. The natural richness of this site marries with the translucence of the year to produce a weightless yet powerful, highly nuanced Barolo that hits all the right notes. Dark cherry, lavender, spice, mint, rose petal and licorice develop in the glass, but it is the interplay of richness and lightness that elevates the Parafada into the realm of the truly sublime. I have never tasted a Parafada like this here. What a wine! Drinking window: 2026-2041. 96 points

    Massolino turned out set of striking Barolos in 2016. The wines are vibrant and super-expressive of site. In recent years, the Massolinos have moved towards gentler winemaking, which really allows the purity of the fruit, while retaining the classic style the estate is known for. Readers will also want to be on the lookout for the 2014 Barolo Riserva Vigna Rionda, one of the great wines of that year, but also one of the most profound Rionds Massolino has made to date.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (02/20)

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  • Massolino Barolo Parussi 2015

    £69.99

    “The 2015 Barolo Parussi is the most powerful and immediate of the Massolino 2015 Barolos. Dark cherry, plum, lavender, menthol, spice, tar and licorice fill out the wine’s ample frame effortlessly. In this range, the Parussi is also the Barolo that most clearly shows the natural richness of the year, and it does so to great effect. Plush, sensual and inviting, the 2015 will drink well with minimal cellaring, although time in bottle will only help. Drinking window: 2022-2040. 93 points

    Brothers Franco and Roberto Massolino turned out a gorgeous set of 2015 Barolos. The Massolinos gave the 2015s about 21 days on the skins. Both primary and secondary fermentation were done in cement, and the wines were aged in cask. More than those details, though, these Barolos stand out because they are very expressive to site, something that was not easy to achieve in 2015.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (02/19)

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  • Massolino Barolo Vigna Rionda 2015

    £143.95

    “The 2015 Barolo Riserva Vigna Rionda is a magnificent wine that shows all the magic this site is so famous for. All the Rionda signatures open in the glass. Sweet dark cherry/plum, lavender, spice, mint and pine meld together in a sensual, beautifully layered Barolo that pushes all the right buttons. The 2015 is going to need a few years to soften, but it is undeniably vivid and arresting in its sheer allure. Drinking window: 2025-2042. 96 points

    Massolino’s 2017s are impressive. The Parafada is a bit closed at this stage, but the other 2017s are terrific. One of the recent developments here has been a move towards fermenting in open-top wood vats. It’s hard to say what role that has had with just a few vintages to look at, but the bigger picture is that these wines have never been more finessed. Readers will also want to check out the 2015 Rionda, a Barolo that I think will be even better in a few years’ time.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (02/21)

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  • MMAD Vineyard Shiraz 2021

    £39.95

    “These are really smart wines, these Mmad wines. The 2021 Shiraz is elegant, fine and spicy, with a core of pure fruit. This is beautiful, very fine. It has notes of raspberry coulis, brine, restraint and blood, with density but lightness. There is also pastrami and pink peppercorn. Blewitt Springs strikes again. Drink: 2022-2032. 94 points”

    Erin Larkin, Wine Advocate (09/22)

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  • Montevertine Pian del Ciampolo 2021

    £48.95

    “The 2021 Pian del Ciampolo is silky, elegant and gracious, all of which make it a fine choice for drinking now and over the next 10-15 years. Despite the warm vintage, the 2021 captures the finesse and elegance of Radda in spades. Time in the glass brings out the wine’s natural richness. The 2021 will be very appealing to drink early, but it has the stuffing to age. Drinking window: 2026-2036. 92 points

    Martino Manetti excelled in both 2020 and 2021. The 2020s are shaping up to be modern-day classics. They offer a stunning mix of precision and power, tempered by a more moderate growing season. The 2021s are a bit richer but also show tremendous harmony. I tasted all the 2021s from cask after a first blending of all the lots.

    As has been the case for a number of years, I continue to be impressed by the Montevertine, a wine that sometimes gets less attention than the flagship Pergole Torte. This is the first year that benefits from the inclusion of a new vineyard at the other end of town that was previously leased by Istine. Not much has changed here in terms of winemaking. Alcoholic fermentation takes place in cement, using indigenous yeasts. Malolactic fermentation follows, also in cement. The wines are racked off their lees and racked into oak in the early part of the following year. Montevertine spends two years in cask, whereas Pergole Torte sees a year in French oak barrique followed by a year in cask.”

    Antonio Galloni, Vinous (08/23)

    The first significant date in the history of this estate is 1967, when Martino’s father Sergio (a Milanese whose family had made money in steel) bought the Montevertine estate as a holiday home. At that time, estate was perhaps something of a misnomer, since Signor Manetti’s purchase basically consisted of a ramshackle farmhouse and sixty acres or so of neglected farmland. However, there was one other hidden asset in the form of Bruno Bini, who lived on the estate and who became, in those early days, the owner’s right hand man and cellarmaster. In 1968, about an acre with north/northeastern exposure was planted to Sangiovese. In 1971, the first vintage from this estate was shown at Vinitaly to much acclaim and the first vintage of Le Pergole Torte followed in 1977.

    In those distant days, Le Pergole Torte was not 100% Sangiovese – in fact, it did not become so until the 1990 vintage. However, Signor Manetti was a devoted protagonist of Sangiovese and its unique power to express the qualities of its native terroir. This was not, of course, the prevailing wisdom: in fact, regulations forbade the making of 100% Sangiovese wines. Instead, they had to be blended with white grape varieties such as Trebbiano. These strictures led directly to the development of the so-called Supertuscans but Le Pergole Torte is a Super-Sangiovese rather than a Supertuscan. The trajectory of this estate had always been towards making an ever better and purer Sangiovese and one which would best express the individual attributes of Radda, which, at 425 metres above sea level, is one of the highest altitude spots in the Chianti Classico appellation.

    Sergio’s philosophy of pure Sangiovese always put at him at odds with the regulatory authorities. In 1981, he stopped producing Chianti Classico and left the DOC. Even when the regulations changed in 1995 and the use of white grape varieties in Chianti was finally banned, he and his wines remained steadfastly outside the DOC. In the early days, Sergio was also helped by Giulio Gambelli, who became his consultant from 1971. Signor Gambelli was one of the main exponents of Sangiovese as a mono-varietal at a time when the rules required blending with white grape varieties. He was also a master taster rather than an oenologist, known in his lifetime as “il grande maestro di Sangiovese” or, more affectionately, as “Il Bicchierino” (Little Glass). Signor Gambelli passed away in January 2012, so the 2011 vintage was his last. Today, the total estate comprises roughly fifty acres, divided into nine parcels. There are three wines: Pian del Ciampolo, Montevertine and Le Pergole Torte.

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  • Moulin de la Gardette Gigondas Ventabren 2019

    £45.49

    Review to follow

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  • Mullineux Old Vines White 2022

    £28.95

    “Opening to a slightly reductive nose, the 2022 Old Vine White offers aromas of citrus blossoms, turned earth and wax melon with yellow apples and Meyer lemon. Medium-bodied, the palate is fresh, bright and succulent, with a kiss of phenolic bitterness before finishing with a long, spicy finish. It’s incredibly food friendly and will continue to deliver pleasure for years. Nicely done! Drink: 2023-2035. 92 points”

    Anthony Mueller, Wine Advocate (12/23)

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  • Mullineux Schist Chenin Blanc 2021

    £51.95

    The 2021 Chenin Blanc Schist come from the Roundstone Estate on rocky, tile-like stones that are less water retentive and produce more compact vines with smaller bunches and extra structure. It has a more austere bouquet than the Granite, slate-like and earthier by comparison. The palate is taut and saline on the entry, quite strict with a little more nerve than the Granite, pointed towards the finish with a tingle of stem ginger on the aftertaste. This will require a little more bottle age. Very fine. Drinking window: 2025-2030. 93 points

    The indefatigable Andrea Mullineux guided me through her latest releases at Roundstone, their farm in Swartland. (If you are eager to read notes on back vintages, verticals of their red blends will be published in due course.) Mullineux farms her vines organically, or they are under conversion, including their entry-level Kloof Street in future vintages, though that will not be stated on the label. First, I asked her about the 2021 vintage. “It was a late start of spring,” she tells me. “It was cold but relatively dry until the end of July and August. August and September saw a bit of rain that led to later budding. There was consistent rain between sunny periods in September, so the vines had large canopies that acted as solar panels, therefore everyone had to be careful with canopy management. It was relatively cold up until Christmas. On January 1 we had the first of several heat waves – not long extended ones – more like waves of heat spikes. There were a lot of grapes, but nothing was going through véraison, that ended up three weeks later than normal for earlier ripening varieties like Chenin Blanc and Syrah, whereas later varieties such as Cabernet Sauvignon and Chardonnay were about on time. You had to make sure you did not miss the right moment to pick whilst keeping in mind not being trigger happy, just because harvest is later, the Syrah by three weeks. This created a concertina affect: all the whites coming in, a short pause and then all the reds. It’s quite a textural vintage with deep colours. On the second day of maceration, there was full colour extraction. The 2020 was a classic vintage with a greater number of warmer days than 2021. There was no picking pressure. We picked the Syrah over 14 days instead of the usual 10 as there was less disease pressure. We had no idea about the lockdown, but we had an amazing team in the winery. There was a natural phenolic ripeness.”

    Tasting through Mullineux Family Wines and their Leeu Passant project in Franschhoek, unsurprisingly, I found a very consistent set of wines that are evolving more individuality. Indeed, I commented to Mullineux that I cannot remember a vintage where there are such distinguishable differences between the Iron, Schist and Granite cuvées. In that respect, the 2020 Schist Syrah is a knockout, one of the finest I have tasted from Mullineux at this stage. Their Kloof Street remains a supremely affordable entry-point for many, whilst their two sweet wines, their straw wine and the third iteration of their solera – Olerasay – are ridiculously good, the latter flirting with perfection.”

    Neal Martin, Vinous (09/22)

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  • Mullineux Syrah 2020

    £31.49

    “The 2020 Syrah is virtually crushed whole cluster (no carbonic) from mainly schist soils, around 70% of the blend. This is well-defined and focused on the nose, red berry fruit intermixed with light ember and garrigues-like aromas. The palate is medium-bodied with sappy red fruit, fine acidity and grip with a Cornas-like finish leaning more towards black than red fruit and cracked black pepper on the aftertaste. This will give 20 years’ drinking pleasure. Drinking window: 2024-2040. 92 points

    The indefatigable Andrea Mullineux guided me through her latest releases at Roundstone, their farm in Swartland. (If you are eager to read notes on back vintages, verticals of their red blends will be published in due course.) Mullineux farms her vines organically, or they are under conversion, including their entry-level Kloof Street in future vintages, though that will not be stated on the label. First, I asked her about the 2021 vintage. “It was a late start of spring,” she tells me. “It was cold but relatively dry until the end of July and August. August and September saw a bit of rain that led to later budding. There was consistent rain between sunny periods in September, so the vines had large canopies that acted as solar panels, therefore everyone had to be careful with canopy management. It was relatively cold up until Christmas. On January 1 we had the first of several heat waves – not long extended ones – more like waves of heat spikes. There were a lot of grapes, but nothing was going through véraison, that ended up three weeks later than normal for earlier ripening varieties like Chenin Blanc and Syrah, whereas later varieties such as Cabernet Sauvignon and Chardonnay were about on time. You had to make sure you did not miss the right moment to pick whilst keeping in mind not being trigger happy, just because harvest is later, the Syrah by three weeks. This created a concertina affect: all the whites coming in, a short pause and then all the reds. It’s quite a textural vintage with deep colours. On the second day of maceration, there was full colour extraction. The 2020 was a classic vintage with a greater number of warmer days than 2021. There was no picking pressure. We picked the Syrah over 14 days instead of the usual 10 as there was less disease pressure. We had no idea about the lockdown, but we had an amazing team in the winery. There was a natural phenolic ripeness.”

    Tasting through Mullineux Family Wines and their Leeu Passant project in Franschhoek, unsurprisingly, I found a very consistent set of wines that are evolving more individuality. Indeed, I commented to Mullineux that I cannot remember a vintage where there are such distinguishable differences between the Iron, Schist and Granite cuvées. In that respect, the 2020 Schist Syrah is a knockout, one of the finest I have tasted from Mullineux at this stage. Their Kloof Street remains a supremely affordable entry-point for many, whilst their two sweet wines, their straw wine and the third iteration of their solera – Olerasay – are ridiculously good, the latter flirting with perfection.”

    Neal Martin, Vinous (09/22)

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