Showing 973–980 of 980 results

  • Terres de Velle Meursault Les Luchets Vieilles Vignes 2017

    £62.95

    Review to follow

    Sold Out

  • Terres de Velle Meursault Premier Cru Les Charmes 2018

    £89.75

    Review to follow

    Sold Out

  • Thomas Farge Saint-Joseph Blanc Grand Angle 2019

    £29.95

    “Headquartered in Saint-Jean de Muzols, this domaine, now run by Guy’s son, Thomas Farge, owns 22 hectares of vineyards spread across the southern portion of Saint-Joseph and down into Cornas and Saint-Péray. The white wines are varying blends of Marsanne and Roussanne, with portions fermented in steam-bent barrels and the rest made in stainless steel. The exception is the Condrieu, which is all barrel fermented and, of course, 100% Viognier. It’s a bit more variable than the other wines in the lineup but reliably excellent. “I’m looking for tension,” explains Farge. “And I love bitterness in the white wines.”

    He says he’s trying to make some natural wines, but he isn’t sure if he’ll do them within the appellation system. Also worth checking out is Farge’s 2019 Vin de France Oxymore collaboration with Stephane Usseglio, in which they blend 65% northern Syrah with 30% Grenache and 5% Counoise from Usseglio’s vineyards. Along with the current releases, I tasted the excellent 2017 Cornas Reynard, which remains much as I observed last time I tasted it, and the 2011 Cornas Harmonie, which appears to be fading a bit and should be consumed over the next few years.

    For the red wines, Farge does a pre-fermentation cold soak, uses a lot of whole clusters and does some extended maceration but with gentle extraction. “I want to have wines that are good to drink on release,” he says. “The goal is to give consumers a good moment.” Farge’s top cuvées are his Cornas Reynard, from 40- to 50-year-old vines, and his Saint-Joseph Passion de Terrasses, from a parcel planted in 1904.”

    Joe Czerwinski, Wine Advocate (01/22)

    Sold Out

  • Tschida Angerhof Samling 88 Trockenbeerenauslese 2012 (375ml)

    £49.95

    “Hans Tschida is another word-class sweet wine producer in Illmitz who handcrafts the stunning amount of 300,000 to 400,000 bottles of wine per year from a total of 40 hectares of vines, of which 80% are used to produce sweet Prädikatsweine from Spätlese to Trockenbeerenauslese and also Eiswein, if possible, and Schilfwein (straw wine). When we met in early July, Hans had just arrived from London where he was awarded “Best Sweet Winemaker of the Year” for the ninth time. The lineup I tasted demonstrates impressively why he is definitely not the wrong guy collecting this award for so many years now. Tschida is a most painstaking producer, and I don’t know anybody who brings out the grape varieties so precisely, so finessed and so digestible. Saying this, I also have to admit I am not a passionate sweet wine drinker at all, though my cellar hosts hundreds of noble sweet wines from Austria, Germany, Switzerland, Alsace and Loire for one reason: some of the greatest wines on planet wine are called sweet wine because there is no better word known to brand them. I don’t love them because they are sweet, though, but because they are utterly complex, refined and concentrated, with a noblesse and finesse that its unique. Sweetness and fruit are just two of the characteristics, but it goes back over years and decades on the bottle when the wine gains in complexity and terroir expression. Whereas most of the sweet wines need to be cellared for years, the wines from Hans Tschida, which are entirely sourced in Illmitz vineyards, are digestible straightaway from the release.

    Based on Gelber Muskateller (Muscat), Muskat Ottonel, Sämling 88 (Scheurebe), Welschriesling, Grüner Veltliner, Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay and even Zweigelt and 100% vinified sur lie in stainless steel, they have a mind-blowing precision and clarity and transcendental fruit expression that one can’t resist drinking even the sweetest examples, which are always balanced not only by acidity but also extract and body. In their clear and focused, fruit-driven style, many wines are close to perfection. However, I didn’t score any wine higher than 96, which might be a bit irritating to some. I strongly believe, though, that the deepest complexity and “a sense of wonder” is caused by more than just fruit precision. The final five or four percent are driven by energy, grip and complexity also in texture that I don’t miss in Tschida’s wines but nevertheless notice they are not there, at least for my palate and experience. There is this extra dimension and tension in the world’s greatest sweet wines to which I count Egon Müller-Scharzhof, Markus Molitor, Rolly-Gassmann (Alsace) and Huet (Vouvray, Loire) to name just four.

    Readers, hopefully you will accept this as a very personal opinion and no degradation of the beautiful sweet wines from Hans Tschida, where I didn’t taste anything else but outstanding Prädkiatsweine. The ex cellar prices, however, are sensationally moderate. You easily pay at least 10 times as much for a Mosel TBA from a top producer.”

    Stephan Reinhardt, Wine Advocate (09/22)

    Sold Out

  • Valette Macon-Chaintre Vieilles Vignes 2017

    £34.99

    “After years of trying, it was with great interest that I at last paid a visit to Philippe Valette’s elusive 8.5-hectare Chaintré estate. The Valette family were the first to exit the local cooperative, and they rapidly won a reputation for rich, concentrated wines that were frequently celebrated in the pages of this publication. On leaving school in 1990, Philippe began to convert the domaine to organic farming, and since 1992, their wines have never been chaptalized. Influenced by a meeting with Pierre Overnoy, Valette has come to identify with the natural wine movement, and today, his wines see little or no sulfur and increasingly long élevage—indeed, the 2006 Clos de Monsieur Noly spent fully 12 years in barrel. If the estate’s wines through the late 1990s were simply powerful, textural examples of high-quality white Burgundy (notes on several will appear in the next installment of Up From the Cellar), the wines being released today belong in a category of their own. Complex and sapid, I find them fascinating, but readers should be prepared to find wines that are quite different from any of the Valettes’ neighbors. Anyone who appreciates the Jura bottlings of Jean-François Ganevat or the Thomas Pico Chablis wines is likely to love them! My experience is that they often benefit from extended aeration, and I tend to decant Valette’s wines or follow them over several days.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (244)

    Sold Out

  • Valette Macon-Villages 2017

    £25.99

    “Aromas of minty green apples and citrus oil introduce the 2017 Mâcon-Villages, a medium to full-bodied, supple and fleshy wine that’s bright and layered, concluding with a saline finish. This bottling comes from comparatively young vines and is vinified and matured in tank. The 2017 is quite easy to understand and makes a great introduction to the wines of this fascinating and idiosyncratic domaine. Drinking window: 2019-2029. 89 points

    After years of trying, it was with great interest that I at last paid a visit to Philippe Valette’s elusive 8.5-hectare Chaintré estate. The Valette family were the first to exit the local cooperative, and they rapidly won a reputation for rich, concentrated wines that were frequently celebrated in the pages of this publication. On leaving school in 1990, Philippe began to convert the domaine to organic farming, and since 1992, their wines have never been chaptalized. Influenced by a meeting with Pierre Overnoy, Valette has come to identify with the natural wine movement, and today, his wines see little or no sulfur and increasingly long élevage—indeed, the 2006 Clos de Monsieur Noly spent fully 12 years in barrel. If the estate’s wines through the late 1990s were simply powerful, textural examples of high-quality white Burgundy (notes on several will appear in the next installment of Up From the Cellar), the wines being released today belong in a category of their own. Complex and sapid, I find them fascinating, but readers should be prepared to find wines that are quite different from any of the Valettes’ neighbors. Anyone who appreciates the Jura bottlings of Jean-François Ganevat or the Thomas Pico Chablis wines is likely to love them! My experience is that they often benefit from extended aeration, and I tend to decant Valette’s wines or follow them over several days.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (244)

    Sold Out

  • Valette Pouilly-Fuisse 2015

    £44.99

    “After years of trying, it was with great interest that I at last paid a visit to Philippe Valette’s elusive 8.5-hectare Chaintré estate. The Valette family were the first to exit the local cooperative, and they rapidly won a reputation for rich, concentrated wines that were frequently celebrated in the pages of this publication. On leaving school in 1990, Philippe began to convert the domaine to organic farming, and since 1992, their wines have never been chaptalized. Influenced by a meeting with Pierre Overnoy, Valette has come to identify with the natural wine movement, and today, his wines see little or no sulfur and increasingly long élevage—indeed, the 2006 Clos de Monsieur Noly spent fully 12 years in barrel. If the estate’s wines through the late 1990s were simply powerful, textural examples of high-quality white Burgundy (notes on several will appear in the next installment of Up From the Cellar), the wines being released today belong in a category of their own. Complex and sapid, I find them fascinating, but readers should be prepared to find wines that are quite different from any of the Valettes’ neighbors. Anyone who appreciates the Jura bottlings of Jean-François Ganevat or the Thomas Pico Chablis wines is likely to love them! My experience is that they often benefit from extended aeration, and I tend to decant Valette’s wines or follow them over several days.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (244)

    Sold Out

  • Wine & Soul Pintas 2019

    £74.75

    “The 2019 Pintas is a field blend (over 40 grapes, but the dominant grapes are Touriga Franca, Tinta Roriz and Touriga Nacional) from old vines (around 90 years) aged for 20 months in 20% new French oak. It comes in at 14.5% alcohol. What can you say about Pintas in all its glory? Big and expressive fruit is the first thing you’ll take note of. Yet the second thing changes the opinion on and character of this wine. It’s not even close to a fruit bomb. Its structure controls it, making it fresh, precise and lively, never jammy and ponderous. Then, it shows off some serious power. The winery’s style generally eschews astringency (except at times on the Port), but there’s certainly a fair bit of power on that finish. This is built to age and develop. It’s delicious but not one-dimensional. It isn’t even close to showing everything it has just now. While not completely unapproachable, it will show a lot better in a few years. It may not hit peak for 10. There were 5,900 bottles produced, plus some other size formats. Drink: 2023-2043. 97 points”

    Mark Squires, Wine Advocate (258)

    Sold Out