Showing all 7 results

  • Colome Altura Maxima Malbec 2017

    £98.95

    “Made with grapes from one of the highest vineyards in the world (3,111 meters) that spend 24 months in used French wood. The cold and high-altitude sun work together to create an outstanding red. Bright, intense violet in the glass. The nose offers sour cherry and acidic fruit, intense violets and a herbal character in which thyme is prominent. In the mouth, the alcohol gives delivers an energetic kick counterbalanced by the heightened freshness. A juicy, firm and potent red like no other on the market. Drinking window: 2020-2032. 94 points

    Colomé is a seemingly impossible winery made real. Set on a mountainous outcrop, Donald Hess’ dream is founded in grapes grown in the high-altitude sun under the watchful eye of oenologist Thibaut Delmotte (who has returned after a year’s sabbatical). Specialists in managing the concentration that comes with the Salta terroirs, they use grapes from different vineyards in the Calchaquí Valleys, from Altura Máxima, planted at 3,100 meters above sea level, down to San Isidro, at a mere 1,700 meters. An important note: in 2019 the hotel reopened, and it is now very much a highlight of the local tourism scene.”

    Joaquin Hidalgo, Vinous (10/20)

    In Stock

  • Colome Altura Maxima Pinot Noir 2020

    £59.99

    Review to follow

    In Stock

  • Zuccardi Aluvional Gualtallary Malbec 2016

    £64.99

    “The 2016 Aluvional Gualtallary is a textbook example of the wild character of the place in a cold vintage. This comes from the subzone close to the monastery, a higher-altitude place (1,350 to 1,450 meters) with the influence of the Jaboncillo slopes and the caliche (a kind of limestone) in the soils. 2016 is a great example of how to tame the wilderness of the place, which, in the cooler year, means contained ripeness and superb texture. 2016 has to be the finest vintage for Gualtallary. 10,300 bottles were filled in February 2017. Drink: 2019-2032. 97 points

    Zuccardi keeps working the origin of their wines, aiming to show the place in their wines while looking for balance. They’re also simplifying things, doing less in the winery and more in the vineyards.

    I tasted 2016, a cool and wet year when they learned a lot: the wines have less alcohol and are better in the Valle de Uco than in the classical zone of Mendoza. For Zuccardi, it might be their finest vintage to date, where the top of the range really excels; the Finca Piedra Infinita really blew me away. 2017 was warmer and, together with 2016, very low yielding. 2018 was cooler than 2017; the wines are fresher, and it’s a more homogeneous year. Most people talk about a classical Mendoza vintage. I didn’t taste anything from the 2019 vintage, which was dry and cool (with temperatures almost as cold as 2016)—something unusual, as the vintages tend to be warm and dry or cold and wet. So, let’s wait for the 2019s, but in the meantime, there are some exceptional wines in the current offering.”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (245)

    In Stock

  • Zuccardi Aluvional Paraje Altamira Malbec 2016

    £64.99

    “The 2016 Aluvional Paraje Altamira has a subtle and elegant nose, nuanced and with very fine, chalky tannins, with grip and texture. It comes from the limestone-rich soils in their vineyards. It fermented in concrete with wild yeasts, with a higher proportion of full clusters than in warmer vintages (something they learned in 2016; before that, they thought they needed darker stems from higher ripeness) and 30% of the wine matured in barrique. It has structure and is very textured—the characteristic of this part of Altamira—and it has a savory, almost salty sensation in the finish. 10,400 bottles produced. Drink: 2020-2032. 96 points

    Zuccardi keeps working the origin of their wines, aiming to show the place in their wines while looking for balance. They’re also simplifying things, doing less in the winery and more in the vineyards.

    I tasted 2016, a cool and wet year when they learned a lot: the wines have less alcohol and are better in the Valle de Uco than in the classical zone of Mendoza. For Zuccardi, it might be their finest vintage to date, where the top of the range really excels; the Finca Piedra Infinita really blew me away. 2017 was warmer and, together with 2016, very low yielding. 2018 was cooler than 2017; the wines are fresher, and it’s a more homogeneous year. Most people talk about a classical Mendoza vintage. I didn’t taste anything from the 2019 vintage, which was dry and cool (with temperatures almost as cold as 2016)—something unusual, as the vintages tend to be warm and dry or cold and wet. So, let’s wait for the 2019s, but in the meantime, there are some exceptional wines in the current offering.”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (245)

    In Stock

  • Zuccardi Finca Piedra Infinita Malbec 2017

    £99.95

    “They use some specific soils for the 2017 Finca Piedra Infinita, up to eight different plots, but not all plots contribute to the wine every vintage; in general, the zones with 20 to 60 centimeters of soil and then large stones with calcium carbonate are reflected in the wines. So, they deconstruct the vineyard, and then they build the blend with the plots they like for each wine, up to eight here but only a specific one for the Supercal and Gravascal. There’s a little more ripeness and exuberance here within the general austerity of the whole Piedra Infinita range, especially when compared with the 2018s. They harvested 15 to 20 days earlier than in 2018 (or in 2016) and they had to run, but the separation they have by soil helped them to harvest earlier the earlier-ripening parts of the vineyard. That gave them a great advantage and they produced very good 2017s, but the condition of the year, a shorter cycle and a more hurried year was what it was. This 2017 is not as long as the 2018, and there is a strong chalkiness in the finish. 7,300 bottles were filled in August 2018. Drink: 2021-2028. 98 points

    Aluvional is Zuccardi’s village range, Altamira is the “paraje” or zone/quarter within the village, something larger than a vineyard, and then there is the single-vineyard range, being more precise in the origin of the grape as you go up in the hierarchy, a little in the Burgundy style. But in the single-vineyard Finca Piedra Infinita, they also have plots, Supercal and Gravascal, like the lieux-dits in a crus. They even use “lugar dicho,” which is the Spanish translation for “lieu-dit.”

    2017 was a warmer year and they harvested very quickly and were guided by the soil differentiation. Some wines can be as fresh as in 2018! 2018 is closed, a young vintage with a sharp and austere profile.

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (03/21)

    In Stock

  • Zuccardi Fosil Chardonnay 2019

    £41.49

    “A Chardonnay from San Pablo, Uco Valley, made with direct pressing and fermented with native yeasts in concrete eggs and 500 liters French barrels with no must. A yellowy-green in the glass, the nose contains aromas of country herbs, resin, apple, pears, peas and a hint of cardamom. Complex and intriguing, the 2019 Fósil Zuccardi has a powerful texture in the mouth and sustained flavor with heightened but contained freshness that comes in with a kick at the end. This white, Sebastian Zuccardi’s best, is influenced by the wines of Burgundy. Drinking window: 2020-2029. 95 points”

    Joaquin Hildago, Vinous (05/20)

    In Stock

  • Zuccardi Jose Zuccardi Malbec 2017

    £33.25

    “The concept of the 2017 José Zuccardi has been varying through the years. It comes from a wine called Zuccardi Z, and it’s a pure Malbec from different regions in the Valle de Uco (today, Altamira and Gualtallary) with limestone soils. It has a touch of Cabernet Sauvignon (only 5% to 10%), which is not mentioned on the label, and is now matured in foudre for two years. The blend and long aging are consistent with the more traditional practices. This time I noticed the minty and balsamic notes from the Cabernet, a hint of camphor, perhaps from the conditions of the vintage and the élevage. It’s medium to full-bodied with fine-grained tannins and a remarkable finish where the chalky texture is more noticeable. 43,000 bottles produced. It was bottled in August 2019. Drink: 2021-2026. 93 points

    Aluvional is Zuccardi’s village range, Altamira is the “paraje” or zone/quarter within the village, something larger than a vineyard, and then there is the single-vineyard range, being more precise in the origin of the grape as you go up in the hierarchy, a little in the Burgundy style. But in the single-vineyard Finca Piedra Infinita, they also have plots, Supercal and Gravascal, like the lieux-dits in a crus. They even use “lugar dicho,” which is the Spanish translation for “lieu-dit.” 2017 was a warmer year and they harvested very quickly and were guided by the soil differentiation. Some wines can be as fresh as in 2018! 2018 is closed, a young vintage with a sharp and austere profile.”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (03/21)

    In Stock