Showing all 8 results

  • Bodegas Tradicion Amontillado VORS

    £64.95

    “The NV Tradicion Amontillado VORS, certainly has the more complex and subtle nose of all these VORS and is on average 45 years old. It has a very clean nose, with elegance and complexity, powerful but subtle notes of hazelnuts, honey and even some dates. The medium-bodied palate shows a sharp wine with strong salinity, it has the power and the lightness, in a very difficult combination. 96 points

    Bodegas Tradicion, despite its name, is one of the youngest wineries in Jerez, it was created in 1998, something not so common, as most of the houses have been in operation for generations. It’s also unusual for a winery to sell exclusively old wines, even more so when it’s a young operation. But this is what Bodegas Tradicion is about. They purchased wines (botas and soleras) from everybody, Osborne, Bobadilla, Croft, Domecq, Sandeman? In the beginning they had maybe 200 botas, and now they own around 1,000. The market at the time when they started was extremely hard for Sherry, and trying to sell a new name, and exclusively old wines, was almost impossible. In 2003 they sold a grand total of 600 bottles, whereas nowadays they sell 18,000-20,0000 bottles per year. They kind of started the other way round, selling only VORS (and one VOS), and working their way towards younger wines to feed their soleras. They have now even released a Fino (a very old Fino, but a Fino after all), and they explained that even though they started buying very old soleras, they are now in need of younger wines, and they do not rule out the need to even purchase their own vineyards in the future. A Benjamin Button kind of winery! The wines are in charge of Jose Maria Quiros, who was winemaker at Agustin Blazquez and later at Domecq and has been a consultant for Alvear in Montilla-Moriles for 15 years. His aim is to preserve traditions and keep the wines as pure and true to their style as possible, and they come through as clean, elegant, precise, well-defined, focused, true to their type and indeed traditional. All wines have a hand-written lot number and year on the label.”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (208)

    In Stock

  • Bodegas Tradicion Oloroso VORS

    £62.99

    “The single vintage wines are different, but they are not necessarily better than the solera wines. In fact I preferred the Oloroso VORS to the two single-vintage; I found it more complex and fluid, while the single vintages were more concentrated and powerful, but not as nuanced. I’m talking about the NV Tradicion Oloroso VORS, on average 45-50 years old, which gives the wine a concentration of glycerin and dry extract that is amazing. Silky, very interesting to see the wine that has been blended over the years is more complex. The proverbial iron fist in a velvet glove, it is full-bodied, and still follows the same, clean, elegant, precise line of the rest of the wines from Tradicion. Drink 2013-2025. 95 points

    Bodegas Tradicion, despite its name, is one of the youngest wineries in Jerez, it was created in 1998, something not so common, as most of the houses have been in operation for generations. It’s also unusual for a winery to sell exclusively old wines, even more so when it’s a young operation. But this is what Bodegas Tradicion is about. They purchased wines (botas and soleras) from everybody, Osborne, Bobadilla, Croft, Domecq, Sandeman? In the beginning they had maybe 200 botas, and now they own around 1,000. The market at the time when they started was extremely hard for Sherry, and trying to sell a new name, and exclusively old wines, was almost impossible. In 2003 they sold a grand total of 600 bottles, whereas nowadays they sell 18,000-20,0000 bottles per year. They kind of started the other way round, selling only VORS (and one VOS), and working their way towards younger wines to feed their soleras. They have now even released a Fino (a very old Fino, but a Fino after all), and they explained that even though they started buying very old soleras, they are now in need of younger wines, and they do not rule out the need to even purchase their own vineyards in the future. A Benjamin Button kind of winery! The wines are in charge of Jose Maria Quiros, who was winemaker at Agustin Blazquez and later at Domecq and has been a consultant for Alvear in Montilla-Moriles for 15 years. His aim is to preserve traditions and keep the wines as pure and true to their style as possible, and they come through as clean, elegant, precise, well-defined, focused, true to their type and indeed traditional. All wines have a hand-written lot number and year on the label.”

    Luis Gutierrez, Wine Advocate (208)

    In Stock

  • Marco de Bartoli Marsala Superiore Riserva Oro 2004 (500ml)

    £59.99

    “The 2004 Marsala d’Oro Superiore Riserva first captures your attention with its gorgeous amber and orange hue, as you swirl and watch its glycerol viscosity coat the glass. Its bouquet pulls you close, a dusting of clove and cinnamon giving way to dried florals, orange peel, incense and baked apples. It’s velvety yet not weighty in feel, with an incredibly layered display that comes in waves, as salted almonds and caramel are followed by grilled mango and peach, the gobs of minerality and brisk acids maintaining impeccable balance. This is decidedly more savory than sweet, tapering off over the course of minutes, while also leaving the senses perfectly refreshed and aching for another salty sip. This glorious effort will make you a lifelong fan of dry Marsala. Drinking window: 2021-2038. 96 points

    If I were permitted only one producer on the island of Sicily to introduce readers to, it would be Marco de Bartoli. When the average person thinks of Marsala, they think of a cheap cooking wine that is the last-minute errand you run right before starting to prepare a meal. What they don’t understand is that Marsala has a deep, rich history of creating wines designed to compete with the best Madeira and Sherry. The problem is that this history was buried deep beneath decades of mass production, a muddling of grape varieties and unnecessary fortification. Marco de Bartoli turned a passion for tradition into a vision of the future, and his heirs, have held the line, learning from their father’s teachings while keeping an innovative eye on new practices and trends. Today, de Bartoli continues to release purely traditional-style Marsala, using only estate-grown Grillo, the Solera barrel aging system (which uses oak and chestnut vats of various sizes) and, in the case of the Vecchio Samperi, no fortification. The Superiore wines do see a light fortification with grape brandy when removed from the Solera system, and they are then aged oxidatively in oak vats until bottling for release. Simply stated, a Marsala from Marco de Bartoli can compete with the greatest Ports, Sherries and Madeira. However, this house is no longer just about Marsala. The current generation, made up of Marco’s children Renato, Sebastiano and Giuseppina, began to experiment with dry whites produced from Grillo, Zibibbo and Catarratto in the 1990s. Today, these wines have really come into their own, showing exceptionally well, and they are true standouts in my recent tastings. What’s more, this experimentation has now evolved even further with the next level of dry whites in the Bartoli lineup, Integer. Both the Zibibbo and the Grillo for Integer are spontaneously fermented without temperature control, spend 10 days macerating with zero sulfur added, and then go through malolactic fermentation and rest for 10 months on the lees in large botti, with a small percentage of the juice spending five months on skins in clay amphora. The resulting wines are unique and stretch the imagination, yet they are also amazingly pleasing, and with notable cellaring potential.”

    Eric Guido, Vinous (06/21)

    In Stock

  • Niepoort 20 Years Old Tawny Port

    £64.95

    “The NV 20 Year Old Tawny Port was bottled in 2016 with a long cork. On first taste, I liked this far more than the 1997 Colheita reviewed this issue (about the same age). This has a bit more weight, a bit more intensity of complex flavors, a hint of brandy and a bit more power. That said, the Colheita stands out more for its texture and freshness. I personally liked the balance a bit better on the 1997, but they are both awfully good and each will justly have their fans. Or, resolve the problem by buying some of each. There’s no right answer–and no wrong one. Drink: 2017-2045. 92 points”

    Mark Squires, Wine Advocate (229)

    In Stock

  • Niepoort Bioma Vinha Velha Vintage Port 2016

    £89.95

    “The 2016 Bioma Vinha Velha Vintage Port is not set to be bottled for several months, which is a little too far in the future by my normal protocols. It is the final blend, though, and it is worth sneaking this beauty into the 2016 report this issue. This single-plot Porto is a worthy competitor to the fine Ports in this vintage and to the 2015 Bioma (Niepoort did not declare his normal blended Vintage Port in 2016). Deep, very concentrated and powerful, this is chock-full of brilliant fruit and flavor. It’s intense, rich, delicious and superb. This will be released in the spring of 2019, lagging behind most of the 2016s. It will be worth the wait. P.S. I had a quick look at the 2017. It’s a long way from being ready, admittedly, but it may well be even better. We will have fun arguing over the 2015, 2016 and 2017 as the years march on. Drink: 2027-2070. 95-97 points

    Niepoort in 2016 only made Bioma and did not make his typical blend. Look for his 2017s. Regarding the tawnies, remember that the drinking windows are just placeholders. Tawnies age well. The longer they are in barrel, the better they age. As long as the cork does not fail, they may hold more or less indefinitely, which is hard to predict. I add a little extra time as they get older, but it’s just a tip to illustrate the category. It is not exactly precise. The beauty of end-date drinking windows for Port, of course, is that no one can yell at me if I’m wrong.”

    Mark Squires, Wine Advocate (07/18)

    In Stock

  • Niepoort Colheita Port 2007

    £74.99

    “The 2007 Colheita Tawny Port was bottled in 2018 with a long cork and 90 grams of residual sugar. This, basically a ten-year tawny, has typical freshness but above average complexity and just a little more concentration. Easy and dryish, this drinks well in a very balanced and refined style. Drink: 2018-2040. 90 points

    Niepoort in 2016 only made Bioma and did not make his typical blend. Look for his 2017s. Regarding the tawnies, remember that the drinking windows are just placeholders. Tawnies age well. The longer they are in barrel, the better they age. As long as the cork does not fail, they may hold more or less indefinitely, which is hard to predict. I add a little extra time as they get older, but it’s just a tip to illustrate the category. It is not exactly precise. The beauty of end-date drinking windows for Port, of course, is that no one can yell at me if I’m wrong.”

    Mark Squires, Wine Advocate (07/18)

    In Stock

  • Niepoort Vintage Port 2015

    £51.95

    “The 2015 Vintage Port is a field blend from old vines (80 to 100 years old). It comes in with 104 grams per liter of residual sugar. This is another gorgeous Vintage Port from Niepoort this issue, elegant, but very powerful and focused. I may have a minor preference for the Bioma this issue, but reasonable minds might differ and this is very fine. The tightly wound precision and serious backbone make this a 2015 with plenty of room to grow in the cellar, but that’s not all. It has fine intensity of flavor and freshness to go with the big tannins here, making this a very serious Port on all fronts. It is impressive overall. It was a tank sample when seen, but it was the final blend and due to be bottled in two weeks when tasted. It should be in the marketplace by the time this article appears. Drinking window: 2030-2070. 94-96 points

    Niepoort’s 2015s are some of the finest in the vintage. This was a year where some houses did not wish to declare. Niepoort happily did and struck gold. With Port, the victory goes to the winner of the marathon, not the sprint, of course. Right at the moment, though, I’m not sure anyone I’ve seen so far did better than Niepoort in 2015. I would add that everything is pretty fine, including the table wines in various regions. Mr. Niepoort had himself quite a vintage. Check out the Bairrada tasting notes for Quinta de Baixo (separately listed in the regular Portugal article), for example.”

    Mark Squires, Wine Advocate (232)

    In Stock

  • Niepoort Vintage Port 2017

    £99.95

    “The 2017 Vintage Port is a field blend from old vines (80 to 100 years old). It comes in with 89 grams per liter of residual sugar. This was set for bottling in two weeks, but it was the final blend. Even when open for a couple of days, this was still tight, muscular and concentrated, grabbing the palate and never letting go. On opening, it was fragrant and delicious, but even then, there was plenty of muscle and evident concentration. The concentration and power merely improved as it aired out—unlike a lot of 2016s (which year Niepoort did not declare). Tasting it after several days open showed that it shut down and closed up in terms of expressiveness, but it definitively proved that it’s an old-school, long-haul wine. Dry, stern and long on the finish, this is brilliant. It is hard to think of any basis on which this is not perfection just now—Niepoort says it is the best he’s ever made. It’s certainly the best I’ve seen from him, and it is a leading candidate for “Wine of the Vintage,” although certainly not the only one. Finally, this is going to require patience. Nothing about it says “drink me now.” It should age brilliantly. If you lack a cellar and patience, look away. Drink: 2035-2085. 99-100 points

    If you’re wondering where the Bioma that I spoke of last year is, it is still not bottled and still not the final blend (so, not reviewed). It will be bottled in January.”

    Mark Squires, Wine Advocate (07/19)

    In Stock