Showing 1–12 of 28 results

  • Bernard & Thierry Glantenay Pommard Premier Cru Les Saussilles 2015

    £79.99

    “The 2015 Pommard 1er Cru les Saucilles is nearly entirely whole bunch fruit this year. It has a lifted boysenberry and cranberry bouquet, a touch of licorice developing with time. The palate is medium-bodied with a smooth, harmonious entry. Here it diverts more towards red fruit laced with white pepper, struck through with a fine line of acidity and bracing sense of energy towards the pastille-like finish. This is one of my picks from Glantenay this year and it comes highly recommended. Drink: 2018-2028. 91-93 points

    Whenever I hear of the travails endured by producers in Volnay, the two growers that my heart goes out to are Jean-Pierre Charlot at Domaine Joseph Voillot and Thierry Glantenay. Both produce excellent wines, both are true gentleman and both, amongst others, seem to stand right in the firing line whenever there is a sudden hailstorm or frost. Still, this does not seem to have prevented Thierry from improving his winery, which now has an extension to accommodate 50,000 bottles, necessary because his grandfather’s house that used to house part of the production has been sold. This clearly gives him and his father plenty more space to conduct their work, allowing them to work by gravity and eschew the use of pumps, and also provided a huge balcony that gives an amazing panorama across towards the Jura Mountains. Thierry told me that he commenced the harvest on 2 September and cropped at 25hl/ha due to hail. Acidity levels came in with pH level between 3.5 and 3.6. There is lot of whole bunch used at this domaine except for the Broullard at around 30% of the crop. The whites were in vat, soon to be fined and bottled in December or January. He described them as wines with the generosity of the 2009 vintage but with better acidity. This was a fine set of wines from Thierry, perhaps in a couple of places a little rustic and “big-boned” but displaying assiduous use of whole bunches and really delivering with gems like the “saucy” Pommard Les Saucilles and Volnay Clos des Chênes.”

    Neal Martin, Wine Advocate (228)

    In Stock

  • Bernard & Thierry Glantenay Puligny-Montrachet Premier Cru Les Folatieres 2017

    £79.99

    “Pretty and expressive, the 2017 Puligny-Montrachet 1er Cru Les Folatières offers up notes of crisp pear, ripe lemon and a touch of struck matchstick from its recent bottling, followed by a medium to full-bodied, satiny palate with tangy acids, nice chewy extract and a chalky finish. It’s one of the finest white wines I’ve tasted from Glantenay. Drink: 2019-2029. 93 points

    The disarmingly modest Thierry Glantenay is emerging as one of the Côte de Beaune’s most exciting producers of red wine. From his hillside winery overlooking the Marquis d’Angerville’s Clos des Ducs, Glantenay is producing a lovely range of elegant, pure and intense Volnays and Pommards that are increasingly consistent and stylistically assured. In the cuverie, he tells me, he is more and more content to let temperature and alcohol do the work of extraction for him, keeping pigéage and rémontage to a minimum; pressing is gentle; and élevage, without racking until the mise en bouteille, takes place in at most 30% new barrels. In the cellar, no matter which barrel you choose, the wines taste reliably wonderful: indeed, after my first tasting with Glantenay, some years ago, I was compelled to return a week later to verify that I hadn’t been imagining things, and that so serious a producer could really be so little known. That his wines sometimes take longer to bounce back after bottling than those of his peers, therefore, surprises me. Glantenay neither fines nor filters, but might the mobile bottling line he uses for the mise perhaps do a gentler job? In any case, the quality is not in doubt, and after the superb vintages of 2015 and 2016, 2017 is a worthy successor, in a lighter, more supple register, certainly, but with plenty of flavor and personality, and at last, available in normal quantities.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (01/19)

    In Stock

  • Bernard & Thierry Glantenay Volnay 2017

    £49.99

    “As usual, the 2017 Volnay Village includes two small premier cru parcels that Glantenay doesn’t wish to vinify separately, and it’s shaping up very nicely, offering up a fragrant nose of sweet cherries and berries, violets and orange rind. On the palate, it’s medium-bodied, satiny and supple, with an ample core of sweet fruit and a fine-grained, elegantly chalky finish. 89-91 points

    The disarmingly modest Thierry Glantenay is emerging as one of the Côte de Beaune’s most exciting producers of red wine. From his hillside winery overlooking the Marquis d’Angerville’s Clos des Ducs, Glantenay is producing a lovely range of elegant, pure and intense Volnays and Pommards that are increasingly consistent and stylistically assured. In the cuverie, he tells me, he is more and more content to let temperature and alcohol do the work of extraction for him, keeping pigéage and rémontage to a minimum; pressing is gentle; and élevage, without racking until the mise en bouteille, takes place in at most 30% new barrels. In the cellar, no matter which barrel you choose, the wines taste reliably wonderful: indeed, after my first tasting with Glantenay, some years ago, I was compelled to return a week later to verify that I hadn’t been imagining things, and that so serious a producer could really be so little known. That his wines sometimes take longer to bounce back after bottling than those of his peers, therefore, surprises me. Glantenay neither fines nor filters, but might the mobile bottling line he uses for the mise perhaps do a gentler job? In any case, the quality is not in doubt, and after the superb vintages of 2015 and 2016, 2017 is a worthy successor, in a lighter, more supple register, certainly, but with plenty of flavor and personality, and at last, available in normal quantities.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (01/19)

    In Stock

  • Bernard & Thierry Glantenay Volnay Premier Cru Clos des Chenes 2016

    £79.99

    “The 2016 Volnay 1er Cru Clos des Chenes comprises only older, 80-year-old vines that were whole bunch, around one-third of the blend, and the younger vines that were destemmed. It has quite a spicy nose with hints of Moroccan spices filtering through the red and black fruit and hints of sandalwood and sage. The palate is very poised on the entry with fine but firm tannin that lends it a Pommard-like personality. I like the salinity of this Volnay that gets the saliva glands flowing, crisp with an oyster shell finish that is not persistent but just very precise. It just needs a little more finesse to develop with time. Drink: 2020-2035. 90-92 points

    “We lost between 70% and 80% of volume in 2016 because of the frost,” Thierry Glantenay tells me as we taste in his house above the winery, a view of the panorama across the Jura and the Alps beyond obscured by winter mist. This is a winemaker who has been through so much in recent years, and yet he never lets it get to his equanimous personality. “In Volnay Brouillauds, where we have a hectare, we cropped nothing. We made a Volnay Village that includes one-third of the premier cru fruit from Brouillards, Les Lurets and L’Ormeau, and the rest comprises the village cru. For the Bourgogne Rouge there are just three barrels, whereas in 2017 there are 21. Fortunately some crus suffered less such as Volnay Caillerets and Pommard Rugiens. At the beginning there was serious mildew pressure but the weather became warm and dry and limited the attack. I am 80% organic but I used treatments around the time of flowering to make sure I had some crop. It was difficult for the morale working in the vines. We started the picking on 23 September and then picked over six days. The average yield was around 13 hectoliters per hectare although fortunately the major loss was with the generic red Burgundy instead of the premier crus. The vinification was normal. We did not have a lot of second-generation grapes when we went through the vineyard again one week later, but the first-generation grapes were very healthy, with good maturity. I did less whole bunch addition in 2016 than in 2015 because I did not want to take the risk with stems that might not be fully lignified.” Following Glantenay for several years now, I have always liked their approach to winemaking. It is such a pity that they have been scuppered by hail and now frost, yet there are always excellent wines to be found and 2016 is no different, particularly two of the surviving Volnay premier crus, Santenots and Caillerets. Fortunately his 2017 is more plentiful, Thierry mentioning that instead of the 9,000 bottles the domaine produced in 2016 there are almost 30,000 in 2017. Then again, that just illuminates the dearth of wines this year so grab what you can.”

    Neal Martin, Wine Advocate (234)

    In Stock

  • Bernard & Thierry Glantenay Volnay Premier Cru Les Brouillards 2017

    £64.99

    “The 2017 Volnay 1er Cru Les Brouillards exhibits beautiful nose notes of orange rind, wild berries, cassis and rose petals. On the palate, it’s medium to full-bodied, supple and satiny, with a lavishly textural attack, melting tannins and a succulent core of fruit, concluding with a long finish. In 2016, this cuvée was so small that Glantenay included it in his Volnay AOC, but happily, 2017 marks its return to the range. 90-92 points

    The disarmingly modest Thierry Glantenay is emerging as one of the Côte de Beaune’s most exciting producers of red wine. From his hillside winery overlooking the Marquis d’Angerville’s Clos des Ducs, Glantenay is producing a lovely range of elegant, pure and intense Volnays and Pommards that are increasingly consistent and stylistically assured. In the cuverie, he tells me, he is more and more content to let temperature and alcohol do the work of extraction for him, keeping pigéage and rémontage to a minimum; pressing is gentle; and élevage, without racking until the mise en bouteille, takes place in at most 30% new barrels. In the cellar, no matter which barrel you choose, the wines taste reliably wonderful: indeed, after my first tasting with Glantenay, some years ago, I was compelled to return a week later to verify that I hadn’t been imagining things, and that so serious a producer could really be so little known. That his wines sometimes take longer to bounce back after bottling than those of his peers, therefore, surprises me. Glantenay neither fines nor filters, but might the mobile bottling line he uses for the mise perhaps do a gentler job? In any case, the quality is not in doubt, and after the superb vintages of 2015 and 2016, 2017 is a worthy successor, in a lighter, more supple register, certainly, but with plenty of flavor and personality, and at last, available in normal quantities.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (01/19)

    In Stock

  • Bernard & Thierry Glantenay Volnay Premier Cru Les Santenots 2017

    £72.95

    “The 2017 Volnay 1er Cru Les Santenots is showing very well from bottle, wafting from the glass with aromas of raspberries, wild berries, dark chocolate and burning embers. Medium to full-bodied, ample and enveloping, it’s supple and lively, framed by powdery tannins. This has developed nicely and will offer a broad drinking window. Drink: 2022-2045. 92 points

    As I wrote last year, the disarmingly modest Thierry Glantenay produces a lovely range of elegant, pure and intense Volnays and Pommards at his hillside winery overlooking the Marquis d’Angerville’s Clos des Ducs. In the cuverie, he tells me, he is more and more content to let temperature and alcohol do the work of extraction for him, keeping pigéage and rémontage to a minimum. He also gently presses the grapes, and élevage, without racking until the mise en bouteille, takes place in at most 30% new barrels. His 2018s have turned out very well, delivering generous, textural wines that remain structurally refined and lively—wines that will drink well young but also age gracefully. This under-the-radar estate comes warmly recommended.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (02/20)

    In Stock

  • Bernard Moreau Chassagne-Montrachet 2018

    £64.99

    “The 2018 Chassagne-Montrachet Village had been blended in July and fined three weeks prior to my visit. It has a delightful bouquet of orange blossom, tinned peach and touches of wild mint, quite intense for a Village Cru. The palate is taut, fresh and spicy on the entry, with touches of white pepper and fennel infusing the citrus fruit. An almost clinical saline finish lingers in the mouth. Superb. Drink: 2021-2036. 90-92 points

    Readers will know the high esteem in which I hold Domaine Bernard Moreau and winemaker Alexandre Moreau. You want the best Chassagne-Montrachet? This is where you call first. I have absolutely no reason to alter that view with respect to the 2018s. “We started picking on 30 August, the same date as 2017 but the profile of the vintage is different,” Moreau told me surrounded by stainless steel vats. “This was because of the size of the crop and the heat. I like to have freshness and not too much alcohol, so I was anxious about the picking date. So I controlled the maturity, constantly tasting in the vineyard and soon realised that the sugar level can rise quicker than the phenolic maturity. I have now started the harvest in August in 2015, 2017 and 2018. I couldn’t understand why if August was so warm, the increase in sugar level was actually quite slow. I knew it was generous, but I did not know it would be so generous in older vineyards – something that I have never seen. For example, I haven’t made nine barrels of Chassagne Chenevottes since I began, then again, yields are only just above 50hl/ha for the Premier Crus. Maybe people are expecting something like 2003, but the 2018s are not heavy at all. For the Village and Premier Crus the alcohol is between 13.0° and 13.5°. As usual we practice natural fermentations, no racking and so forth – the only difference in 2018 is that it was a super-long alcoholic fermentation. Many barrels were fermenting until July – and I don’t mind that – I like to play this game as you have activity in the barrel with the fine lees in suspension and natural CO2 that protects your wine. The pH is around 3.19, which gives them a lot of freshness. It is not a vintage for early bottling and so most of the Premier Crus will be bottled next Spring.””

    Neal Martin, Vinous (01/20)

    In Stock

  • Jean-Pierre Guyon Chorey-Les-Beaune Les Bons Ores 2016

    £49.95

    “The 2016 Chorey-lès-Beaune Les Bons Ores is showing superbly from bottle, and if a better example of this appellation was produced this year, I would love to taste it. Bursting from the glass with aromas of wild berries, rose petal and cinnamon, it’s medium to full-bodied, velvety and expansive, with supple, powdery tannins, succulent acids and an ample core of fruit. While Chorey can tend to rusticity, here it is interpreted through a Vosne-Romanée lens, and the result is fabulous. Drink: 2018-2035. 91 points

    This set of 2016s from Domaine Jean-Pierre Guyon only confirmed the more than favorable impression I formed on my December 2018 visit, and I recommend the wines to readers in the strongest possible terms.”

    William Kelley, Wine Advocate (242)

    In Stock

  • Marc Colin Chassagne-Montrachet Margot 2019

    £59.99

    “The 2019 Chassagne-Montrachet Village “Margot”, the name of this particular cuvée rather than the lieu-dit, comes from four parcels and is raised in 15% new oak. It has a well defined bouquet with orange pith and yellow plum aromas that gain intensity with aeration. The palate is full of energy with impressive depth, gorgeous orange zest and mandarin notes, almond and a little walnut. Very harmonious and very persistent on the finish, this punches well above its weight. Drinking window: 2022-2036. 91-93 points

    Since splitting with his brother Joseph, whose wines will hopefully be added to this report in the not-too-distant future, winemaker Damien Colin, together with his sister Caroline, has continued to create some of the best Burgundy wines you will find in Saint-Aubin, Chassagne and Puligny-Montrachet, from his winery based in the confusingly-titled village of Gamay. “It is a complicated growing season with the frost and the ‘canicule’ [heat wave]. In some appellations we produced just 30% of a normal crop in 2019, though there are others that produced a normal yield.” Damien Colin added that in Saint-Aubin, parcels located on the slopes that normally escape frost, were affected in 2019. Vines on flatter areas that are prone to frost damage seemed to escape Scot-free. He continued saying that in Saint-Aubin, buds had already begun opening, allowing moisture to enter, causing some of them to ‘explode’ when it turned to ice.

    “Flowering was normal and then there was a heatwave in the summer, but the vines did not suffer much hydric stress despite the high temperatures that reached around 40°C. The harvest was small, so the maturity came very quickly. The vintage was expected to be 15 September but by the end of August the natural alcohol was around 12.0° to 12.5°. Therefore, we brought the picking forward and began on 7 September until 18-19 September. For the whites the alcohol degree is 13.5° to 14.0°C but with high acidity, mainly tartaric. The malic was low so after the malolactic fermentation the acidity levels are still good. The harvest was rapid because of the small yields, though we had to keep stopping and starting to be precise in terms of picking. The fermentation was quite quick, finishing around mid-November and the malos passed normally in springtime. From 2019 we no longer use SO2 until after the malolactic, which was fine in 2019 as the fruit was healthy. The SO2 inhibits some of the natural yeasts and without SO2 we have a broad spectrum of yeasts that engender more complex wine. The Village Crus are matured in around 15% new oak and the Premier Crus between 20% and 25% new oak. The 2019s are all taken from vat and will be bottled next spring with the final six months in tank.”

    The 2019s from Domaine Marc Colin do not disappoint and it is remarkable, almost irrational that such freshness could be conjured in such a dry and warm season. Standout? Perhaps surprising to some, it is not their morsel of Montrachet, good as that is, but a thrilling Bâtard-Montrachet, a Grand Cru that I feel over-performs in this vintage. If unable to splash the cash, then head for their outstanding Saint-Aubin Les Charmois or Les Combes or just buy both. I also found much to admire apropos their nervy Chassagne-Montrachets, particularly in Les Vides Bourses. Not every cuvée hit the bulls-eye, but generally these 2019s continue to consolidate Damien Colin’s reputation as winemaker par excellence. Pressing him to choose between 2018 and 2019 he replies: “It is difficult for me to say one vintage is better than the other. I find more terroir character in 2019 and I think that they will need more time.””

    Neal Martin, Vinous (12/20)

    In Stock

  • Marc Colin Chassagne-Montrachet Vieilles Vignes Rouge 2015

    £44.95

    “The 2015 Chassagne-Montrachet Rouge Vieilles Vignes, from 70-year-old vines located in three parcels, has a lovely nose, a touch of damp mulch tincturing the lively red cherry and crushed strawberry fruit. It almost seems like there is some stem addition, but in fact it is 100% de-stemmy. The palate is well balanced with a gentle grip on the entry, fleshier than many red Chassagne 2015s, perhaps reflecting the warmth of the growing season, a slight grittiness on the texture towards the finish. This is very fine. Drink: 2018-2025. 87-89 points

    Damien Colin informed me that he had been taking English lessons in recent weeks so he invited me to conduct the tasting in his second language, rather than French as we usually do. I must say, he has a good teacher because he spoke very well. But it was the wines that did the talking, fluently translating the vagaries of their respective terroirs. A few of his whites had been bottled in August just before the harvest, although most of the range will be bottled early spring next year. “The 2015 vintage was easy,” Damien told me, laughing at that thought after the trauma of the 2016. “After the high temperatures we started picking on 2 September. We thought that the fruit would be riper after a sunny vintage but the alcoholic degree was very correct in the end, between 12.5° and 13.0°. The problem was the acidity but after the malolactic the acidity levels stayed constant. [A phenomenon that a couple of growers had told me, including David Croix at Domaine des Croix.] The wines were less rich and fresher than we expected. We search more and more freshness and acidity, and we had a lot of that in Saint Aubin because of the limestone soils. The vinification was normal although now we are using more and more foudres, which we like because it helps us keep the freshness and does not impart too much taste of the wood. In addition we discovered that there is more carbonic gas remaining after the two fermentations so that means that the wine is more protected and we do not need to use so much SO2. It means these wines have more energy. We use 30-40% maximum for each cuvée.”

    This was another very impressive set of wines from Damien and Joseph Colin, reaffirming their position as one of the best winemakers in the Côte de Beaune. As I remarked to Damien, I felt that their strongest suit is their Saint Aubins, whose limestone soils advantaged them in the warmth of the 2015 season, imparting the acidity naturally and retaining good pH levels. This was evidenced by the Chassagne-Montrachet that did not quite deliver the same race and nervosité. If you can find their Grand Crus, then you have my congratulations. As I mention in the tasting notes, they had the novel idea of commissioning a specially-made barrel with staves alternating between old and new to inhibit the influence of the oak. I thought this worked especially well with the exemplary Montrachet Grand Cru. Overall, it was a marvelous set of whites from Joseph and Damien Colin that are mostly strongly recommended.”

    Neal Martin, Wine Advocate (228)

    In Stock

  • Marc Colin Santenay Les Champs Claude Vieilles Vignes 2015

    £44.95

    “The 2015 Santenay Vieilles Vignes Champs Claude, which comes from vines planted back in 1901 (so they are genuine Vieilles Vignes!) has a vibrant, edgy, redcurrant and cranberry scented bouquet, hints of tomato vine and persimmon developing in the glass. The palate is medium-bodied with gentle, caressing tannin. This is one of the best balanced and harmonious of the domaine’s 2015s, with a sensual and quite beguiling finish that lingers long in the mouth. This comes highly recommended. Drink: 2017-2026. 90-92 points

    Damien Colin informed me that he had been taking English lessons in recent weeks so he invited me to conduct the tasting in his second language, rather than French as we usually do. I must say, he has a good teacher because he spoke very well. But it was the wines that did the talking, fluently translating the vagaries of their respective terroirs. A few of his whites had been bottled in August just before the harvest, although most of the range will be bottled early spring next year. “The 2015 vintage was easy,” Damien told me, laughing at that thought after the trauma of the 2016. “After the high temperatures we started picking on 2 September. We thought that the fruit would be riper after a sunny vintage but the alcoholic degree was very correct in the end, between 12.5° and 13.0°. The problem was the acidity but after the malolactic the acidity levels stayed constant. [A phenomenon that a couple of growers had told me, including David Croix at Domaine des Croix.] The wines were less rich and fresher than we expected. We search more and more freshness and acidity, and we had a lot of that in Saint Aubin because of the limestone soils. The vinification was normal although now we are using more and more foudres, which we like because it helps us keep the freshness and does not impart too much taste of the wood. In addition we discovered that there is more carbonic gas remaining after the two fermentations so that means that the wine is more protected and we do not need to use so much SO2. It means these wines have more energy. We use 30-40% maximum for each cuvée.”

    This was another very impressive set of wines from Damien and Joseph Colin, reaffirming their position as one of the best winemakers in the Côte de Beaune. As I remarked to Damien, I felt that their strongest suit is their Saint Aubins, whose limestone soils advantaged them in the warmth of the 2015 season, imparting the acidity naturally and retaining good pH levels. This was evidenced by the Chassagne-Montrachet that did not quite deliver the same race and nervosité. If you can find their Grand Crus, then you have my congratulations. As I mention in the tasting notes, they had the novel idea of commissioning a specially-made barrel with staves alternating between old and new to inhibit the influence of the oak. I thought this worked especially well with the exemplary Montrachet Grand Cru. Overall, it was a marvelous set of whites from Joseph and Damien Colin that are mostly strongly recommended.”

    Neal Martin, Wine Advocate (228)

    In Stock

  • Marquis d’Angerville Volnay Premier Cru Champans 2018

    £99.95

    “The 2018 Volnay Les Champans 1er Cru has an outgoing bouquet similar to the Taillepieds, albeit one with more intellectual weight and gravitas behind it. Black cherries, blueberry and light cassis aromas reveal crushed stone and undergrowth notes, all delivered with intensity and superb delineation. The palate is medium-bodied with slightly firmer, stockier tannins than the Taillepieds, darker fruit and grainier texture toward the persistent finish. I see this has having real long-term potential. Excellent. Drinking window: 2023-2050. 93-95 points

    “It was a pretty uneventful and easy season,” a typically sanguine Guillaume d’Angerville told me, as we tasted his 2018s in the ground floor tasting room within his maison that lies within Clos des Ducs. “There was an early flowering around 20 May. There was no significant mildew pressure and the vines reacted better than expected during the dry conditions. They are getting accustomed to it. They didn’t seem to suffer. We started the harvest early on 1 September. You know, the eight most precocious years have all been since I took over the Domaine from my father in 2003. We finished the picking after around five days. The vinification was unusual as the sugar levels were high for the yeasts to work efficiently and so a couple of malos took place during the alcoholic fermentation, which was not healthy for the yeast. So getting the wine to complete dryness was the challenge. Everything is de-stemmed, though for Volnay Frémiets I use a single 80 hectoliter vat and we ended up with more volume than that. So we used an additional smaller vat and in this we used 50% whole bunch that will be included in the final blend.”

    Neal Martin, Vinous (01/20)

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